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If you were gonna make a pineapple sauce?


Doodad
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I have pineapple, papaya (whole) and mango puree.

I am thinking a relish of pineapple and papaya (which are fresh) in the mango puree, but reduced to stickiness with a reisling so I can mold with a spoon.

Any thoughts?

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What are you going to use the sauce for? Savory or sweet applications?

It is one of two sauces for two types of grilled shrimp. One is barbequed shrimp and will get a whisky roumalade and this will go with a more citrusy Aussie style grilled shrimp.

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Be sure your pineapple's cooked, or otherwise treated to denature the enzymes that turn proteins to mush.

MelissaH

Is THAT what happened!! I made some grilled spot prawns with a pineapple/red bell pepper/red onion/basil relish in the morning and brought it to work for lunch, and the prawns were so soft I was really concerned about eating them. Huh! Besides cooking, how might my pineapple be "otherwise treated to denature the enzymes?"

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Be sure your pineapple's cooked, or otherwise treated to denature the enzymes that turn proteins to mush.

MelissaH

Is THAT what happened!! I made some grilled spot prawns with a pineapple/red bell pepper/red onion/basil relish in the morning and brought it to work for lunch, and the prawns were so soft I was really concerned about eating them. Huh! Besides cooking, how might my pineapple be "otherwise treated to denature the enzymes?"

That's my guess: the bromelain in the pineapple went to work on your shrimp, started to break down the proteins in them. Result: mush. Same thing that happens when you put raw pineapple (or papaya, or kiwifruit) into gelatin. If you want a real trip, take a little piece of raw pineapple and hold it between your lip and your teeth. Feel the prickle? That's the enzyme starting to chew away at your lip proteins! :shock:

As far as denaturing the enzyme so it doesn't turn your shrimp to mush: heat treatment, AKA cooking, is the most reliable way, and the only thing I know of for sure that will keep your meal edible and non-toxic. The other thing you can do is keep the pineapple and the protein separated till the very last possible second. Put the prawns in one container, the relish in another, and put a little of each on your fork at lunchtime.

MelissaH

MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

foodblog1 | kitchen reno | foodblog2

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As far as denaturing the enzyme so it doesn't turn your shrimp to mush: heat treatment, AKA cooking, is the most reliable way, and the only thing I know of for sure that will keep your meal edible and non-toxic. The other thing you can do is keep the pineapple and the protein separated till the very last possible second. Put the prawns in one container, the relish in another, and put a little of each on your fork at lunchtime.

MelissaH

Freezing may also work (another "heat" treatment)

Karen Dar Woon

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As far as denaturing the enzyme so it doesn't turn your shrimp to mush: heat treatment, AKA cooking, is the most reliable way, and the only thing I know of for sure that will keep your meal edible and non-toxic. The other thing you can do is keep the pineapple and the protein separated till the very last possible second. Put the prawns in one container, the relish in another, and put a little of each on your fork at lunchtime.

MelissaH

Freezing may also work (another "heat" treatment)

Nope, sorry. Doesn't work.

Freezing is actually a common way to keep enzymes and other proteins good and active. My husband (actually some of his students) did an experiment where they froze pineapple in liquid nitrogen, and then brought it back up to room temperature. It still kept gelatin from setting because the enzyme was still able to chew up the protein.

MelissaH

MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

foodblog1 | kitchen reno | foodblog2

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Freezing may also work (another "heat" treatment)

Nope, sorry. Doesn't work.

Freezing is actually a common way to keep enzymes and other proteins good and active. My husband (actually some of his students) did an experiment where they froze pineapple in liquid nitrogen, and then brought it back up to room temperature. It still kept gelatin from setting because the enzyme was still able to chew up the protein.

MelissaH

Melissa's right, freezing doesn't work. The students used liquid nitrogen (–320 deg F) and the enzyme still works. They also tried various forms of heat, all of which worked depending on the amount of heat applied.

One group soaked the pineapple in car battery acid, which turned the pineapple black and stopped the enzyme from working, but I wouldn't suggest eating it. Another group used bleach, which deactivated the enzyme and turn the pineapple completely white. I suppose that you could wash it very well with water afterwards and it might be safe to eat.

On a related note, Heston Blumenthal suggests that adding chili peppers deactivates the enzymes in pineapple, but I'm skeptical. I currently have an undergraduate student performing experiments to check this out.

Casey Raymond aka CRChemist

Chemist, Homebrewer

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