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Daily Gullet Staff

Good Mourning Vietnam

37 posts in this topic

Chef Carey, you're our culinary Dickens for the best of times, and the worst. Many thanks.

Thanks for the lovely words, Maggie. Thank you and Dave for the opportunity to publish here.

I apologize for my very tardy thanks.

I have been incredibly busy - I've completed writing one culinary novel (mystery, with a chef as the protagonist) - editing going on now - and am halfway through another.

I hope the new year is good to you and yours.

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Chef Carey, you're our culinary Dickens for the best of times, and the worst. Many thanks.

Thanks for the lovely words, Maggie. Thank you and Dave for the opportunity to publish here.

I apologize for my very tardy thanks.

I have been incredibly busy - I've completed writing one culinary novel (mystery, with a chef as the protagonist) - editing going on now - and am halfway through another.

I hope the new year is good to you and yours.


From Dixon, Wyoming

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I just got back on this after spending 2 years in Colombia (sometimes reminded me of my '68 senior trip) and I still can't eat a lima bean. I think I met you while I was there, having spent all my time in the 1/27. I try not to think about it, but when you're being coptered into drilling sites, you automatically look to see where the patches on the bullet holes are located so you know whether to wear the flak jacket or sit on it.


From Dixon, Wyoming

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I just got back on this after spending 2 years in Colombia (sometimes reminded me of my '68 senior trip) and I still can't eat a lima bean.  I think I met you while I was there, having spent all my time in the 1/27.  I try not to think about it, but when you're being coptered into drilling sites, you automatically look to see where the patches on the bullet holes are located so you know whether to wear the flak jacket or sit on it.

Well, we may have met, I did spend a lot of time with the 1/27 - and the 2/27.

I always sat on my flak jacket. :wacko:

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I just got back on this after spending 2 years in Colombia (sometimes reminded me of my '68 senior trip) and I still can't eat a lima bean.  I think I met you while I was there, having spent all my time in the 1/27.  I try not to think about it, but when you're being coptered into drilling sites, you automatically look to see where the patches on the bullet holes are located so you know whether to wear the flak jacket or sit on it.

Well, we may have met, I did spend a lot of time with the 1/27 - and the 2/27.

I always sat on my flak jacket. :wacko:

I always try to nab a second - I notice the pilots do the same. I still think the junk we're flying around in in Colombia is Viet surplus - old 212's. I must say though, the camp food on these drilling rigs is fantastic as long as you don't eat beef. Seafood stew with baby squid, baby octopus, clams and shrimp in a nice creamy sauce over rice can't be beat. Goat chops are pretty good also. But you can't get me to try another hamburger because I don't have that many teeth I want to lose.


From Dixon, Wyoming

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I just got back on this after spending 2 years in Colombia (sometimes reminded me of my '68 senior trip) and I still can't eat a lima bean.  I think I met you while I was there, having spent all my time in the 1/27.  I try not to think about it, but when you're being coptered into drilling sites, you automatically look to see where the patches on the bullet holes are located so you know whether to wear the flak jacket or sit on it.

Well, we may have met, I did spend a lot of time with the 1/27 - and the 2/27.

I always sat on my flak jacket. :wacko:

I always try to nab a second - I notice the pilots do the same. I still think the junk we're flying around in in Colombia is Viet surplus - old 212's. I must say though, the camp food on these drilling rigs is fantastic as long as you don't eat beef. Seafood stew with baby squid, baby octopus, clams and shrimp in a nice creamy sauce over rice can't be beat. Goat chops are pretty good also. But you can't get me to try another hamburger because I don't have that many teeth I want to lose.

C-212's? They have to fly pretty low, don't they?

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This is for those of you who have never been in a war. Or loved someone who was in a war. Or had someone maimed. Or lost someone in a war.

I'd like you to give it more than one day's thought a year.

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