Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Cheese substitutes


Chufi
 Share

Recommended Posts

I have an American mac 'n cheese recipe that I need to make with ingredients that are readily available here in the Netherlands. I know I can throw almost any cheese in mac & cheese (and usually, I do, and just make it with whatever I have)but this time, the end result has to be as similar to the original recipe as possible.

The recipe uses a small amount of Parmesan, which I have, and equal amounts of "shredded mild Cheddar" and "shredded Monterey Jack or Swiss".

I was thinking of using a mild Gouda for the Cheddar. But what to use for ther Monterey Jack? And what does Swiss mean - I'm hoping gruyere, because that's easy to get here...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My thought would be emmental for "swiss" cheese in the U.S. (When americans say 'swiss cheese' they mean the stuff with holes in it.) But, emmental should be just as easy to get as gruyere.

For chedder here, I will usually substitute gouda, as well - or mimolette.

52 martinis blog

@52martinis

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The recipe uses a small amount of Parmesan, which I have, and equal amounts of "shredded mild Cheddar" and "shredded Monterey Jack or Swiss".

I was thinking of using a mild Gouda for the Cheddar. But what to use for ther Monterey Jack? And what does Swiss mean - I'm hoping gruyere, because that's easy to get here...

Gouda for Cheddar; Havarti for Monterey Jack; emmental or Jarlsberg (or other large-holed mild pale cheese) for Swiss.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think North Americans usually mean Emmenthal, when they use the term "Swiss," and I think Jarlsberg is an easy substitute. But I think Gruyere is much, much better for Mac n' Cheese. I always try to use Gruyere in Mac n' Cheese, and I have sometimes, in a hurry tried to do my shopping in stores in Canada (from chain grocery stores to otherwise reputable cheese mongers) when Gruyere is not available. The person at the cheese counter always recommends Emmental or Jarlsberg, and the result of this has always been extremely rubbery.

I agree about using Havarti for Montery Jack, though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use gruyere and cheddar in my mac & cheese. The gruyere gives that gooey, melty texture while the cheddar gives me the salty sharp taste. I would think gouda would be a good substitute for the cheddar.

You could, of course, use Velveeta. :wink:

...wine can of their wits the wise beguile, make the sage frolic, and the serious smile. --Alexander Pope

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone. Havarti, I've never seen that here.

The recipe itself says "Montery or Swiss". If I understand the replies correctly, that means "Monterey or Emmenthal."

So with Parmesan, Gouda and Emmenthal my version would be close to the original?

Usually, how someting tastes is the most important thing to me, but in this case, it's all about adapting this particular recipe for Dutch readers.

Edited by Chufi (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have an American mac 'n cheese recipe that I need to make with ingredients that are readily available here in the Netherlands. I know I can throw almost any cheese in mac & cheese (and usually, I do, and just make it with whatever I have)but this time, the end result has to be as similar to the original recipe as possible. ...

... You could, of course, use Velveeta.  :wink:

Marie Antoinette asked "why don't they eat brioche?" when told that the protesters had no bread.

Velveeta is, of course, readily available in Viva's North Carolina.

And in South Carolina, where maps are reputedly so scarce. :rolleyes:

But its a mistake to think that it must therefore be easily available worldwide.

I had to research to discover what this miracle ingredient of US-style macaroni cheese actually was, as it was recommended so frequently on the dedicated m&c thread -

http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A262414

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Velveeta

and to discover that there is no real substitute for that cheese substitute, which might possibly be available in Germany, but is prohibitively expensive in the UK as 'vanity airfreight'.

http://www.chowhound.com/topics/423685

Sorry, but its right up there with the brioche... :biggrin::wink:

"If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch ... you must first invent the universe." - Carl Sagan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So with Parmesan, Gouda and Emmenthal my version would be close to the original?

Usually, how someting tastes is the most important thing to me, but in this case, it's all about adapting this particular recipe for Dutch readers.

Clearly we should have done an american cheese tasting while you were visiting seattle :laugh:

make sure you're using a mild young gouda, and even then it's not a great sub for cheddar. I'm not familiar with Dutch cheeses to know of a better choice though (one of these days I'll have to spend more than 2 hours in amsterdam & go on a cheese binge!) so go with gouda, but you might want to mix in a little of a mild buttery cheese (think spanish tettilla?) to balance it out...

Do you suffer from Acute Culinary Syndrome? Maybe it's time to get help...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have an American mac 'n cheese recipe that I need to make with ingredients that are readily available here in the Netherlands. I know I can throw almost any cheese in mac & cheese (and usually, I do, and just make it with whatever I have)but this time, the end result has to be as similar to the original recipe as possible. ...

... You could, of course, use Velveeta.  :wink:

Marie Antoinette asked "why don't they eat brioche?" when told that the protesters had no bread.

Velveeta is, of course, readily available in Viva's North Carolina.

And in South Carolina, where maps are reputedly so scarce. :rolleyes:

But its a mistake to think that it must therefore be easily available worldwide.

I had to research to discover what this miracle ingredient of US-style macaroni cheese actually was, as it was recommended so frequently on the dedicated m&c thread -

http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A262414

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Velveeta

and to discover that there is no real substitute for that cheese substitute, which might possibly be available in Germany, but is prohibitively expensive in the UK as 'vanity airfreight'.

http://www.chowhound.com/topics/423685

Sorry, but its right up there with the brioche... :biggrin::wink:

I was actually thinking that Velveeta would easily survive the shipping process.... having a half-life and all... :raz: North Carolina Velveeta purchasers stand ready to help their European colleagues!

...wine can of their wits the wise beguile, make the sage frolic, and the serious smile. --Alexander Pope

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Havarti is a Danish cheese, somewhat similar to Muenster --

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Havarti

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monterey_Jack_Cheese

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muenster_cheese

The recipe you are working on sounds wonderful, but fancier than most classic American recipes--which would only involve Cheddar or the like. I hope you share the final formula with us!

Edited by baroness (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you all. I can't get into more specifics right now, I'll explain why: I'm working for the culinary show on a Dutch tv station at the moment and we're doing a program which will feature this mac & cheese dish, which is a recipe that was given to us by an American restaurant.

Because the recipe has to be easy to make by our Dutch viewers, but still recognizable as the American recipe, I turned to eGullet for help :smile:

Both recipe and taped show will appear online within a couple of weeks, and I'll post the link then for anyone who's interested enough to watch/read something in Dutch. :laugh:

Thanks again!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

FWIW, you can respect the spirit of the recipe by featuring one dominant cheese and adding at least two others to enrich the taste with contrasting, complementary flavors.

The recipe sounds a bit boring since it requires mild Cheddar (a young cheese, usually dyed orange) rather than sharp aged white Cheddar. It caters to bland tastes, though a mild Cheddar would be absolutely perfect for children. Adding a generous amount of an aged Gouda--what is sold here as Gold Reserve--would supply both the orange color and more flavor were you to stick to a mild Gouda as the principal cheese.

As for the Monterey Jack or Emmental, the two having completely different qualities! Therefore, the restaurant offers some flexibility, based on personal preference. M.J. is buttery as Eden said above, and semi-soft. It's melted for the goo factor on a lot of pseudo-Mexican dishes. (The aged version is quite lovely.) I'd think Edam. However, a Gouda made with goat's milk might be more interesting, though I'd never make this casserole without a little blue cheese.

* * *

I know eG members lament the lack of Cheddar in France, too. While I understand why European countries with incredible cheeses highlight their own, I am not sure why British cheeses are under-represented on the continent. Cheddar may not be Stilton, but there are good reasons why the colonies make it, too.

"Viciousness in the kitchen.

The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Sorry about being late with my update, but the tv show aired while I was on holiday. Amapola, the program is Eten met Bianca on the Amsterdam local tv station at5.

here is a link to the website and to my version (in Dutch) of the recipe that was given to us by restaurant Florent in New York. The program was about the possibilities of late night dining in Amsterdam, the conclusion being, there is none, so you'd better go home and make some mac and cheese, recipe courtesy of a 24-hour restaurant in the US. :biggrin:

If you scroll down a bit and click on Bekijk de video, you can watch the program. It lasts about 10 minutes and for the last 4 minutes or so you can watch me in my kitchen make mac and cheese :smile:

anyway thanks for the help everybody, I ended up making the reicpe with semi-aged Gouda, Gruyere and Parmesan, and it was very rich and very delicious.

Edited by Chufi (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

That was very cool...what time to most restaurants close in Amsterdam...and is there still any street food late at night?

tracey

The great thing about barbeque is that when you get hungry 3 hours later....you can lick your fingers

Maxine

Avoid cutting yourself while slicing vegetables by getting someone else to hold them while you chop away.

"It is the government's fault, they've eaten everything."

My Webpage

garden state motorcyle association

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That was very cool...what time to most restaurants close in Amsterdam...and is there still any street food late at night?

tracey

most kitchens close around 10, 11. There a couple of late night places where you can order until midnight or a little later. But not many. Streetfood can be had until much later, and in bars you can order snacks etc, but we were looking for places where you can have a sit-down dinner with a nice glass of wine.

Ok this doesn´t have anything to do with mac and cheese anymore, maybe I should add these findings to the Amsterdam thread!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...