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jchaput

Good Bread

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The cheater's answer would be to say Whole Foods - which carries bread from a number of local bakeries.

Le Picnic in West Van recently changed hands is no longer as good. Danish Bakery in Westridge is now a Cob's. Very sad.

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perhaps it depends on what they define as "good" bread. Personally, there are times when I don't mind Cob's at all. Besides, it DOES stand for Canada's Own Bread Store. Artisan Bakery has great stuff, although I wonder whether many people will think the difference is worth the extra $$.

May be you could suggest they make their own bread?


Karen Dar Woon

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.....I don't mind Cob's at all. Besides, it DOES stand for Canada's Own Bread Store....

Ummm...

Well No it doesn't-it stands for Contains Our Best Sawdust. :raz:

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Personally, there are times when I don't mind Cob's at all. Besides, it DOES stand for Canada's Own Bread Store.

COBS is actually an Australian chain (Baker's Delight) renamed for the Canadian market. And the actual breads look pretty similar to me (COBS vs. Baker's Delight).

http://www.cobsbread.com/about_us/index.htm

http://www.bakersdelight.com.au/cms/docume...hp?objectID=102

I don't mind their basic white sandwich bread. But most everything else I've tasted has been barely a notch above Safeway bread.


Baker of "impaired" cakes...

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This topic has come up in other threads, but I have to back up the Savary Island Pie company in West Van once more. There bread is simply the best around: the Italian can be eaten as a meal in itself (my boys do); the sourdough (only made on Thursday) is perfect for big sandwiches; and the soda bread is very authentic (I lived in Ireland). COBS, in comparison, is bland bland bland. And while I shop at Whole Foods more than I should, I find most of their bread to be dry and/or stale. Savary Island or bust.


Paul B

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There's a persian bakery in North Van that supplies bread all over the city to other persian stores and a few grocery stores. I highly recommend heading there and getting some Sangak...I think that's what it is called anyway...(my wife is the persian one!) It is delicious on it's own or with some cheese. I also love to toast it.

The name of the bakery is Afra and it's on Pemberton just off of Marine Dr.

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There's a persian bakery in North Van that supplies bread all over the city to other persian stores and a few grocery stores.

Somewhat along the same vein, Inn Cogneato on upper Lonsdale also makes a very nice Barbary bread that can be purchased for take-out. (They are mostly a casual restaurant but started out as a bakery.)


Baker of "impaired" cakes...

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