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snowangel

Home Made Ice Cream (2002–2012)

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You should be able to take most ice cream recipes and instead of freezing them in an ice cream machine, use a container in the freezer that you stir every 10-15 min until it gets hard.  This will most likely produce larger ice crystals than if made in a machine, but it should be ok.

Ben

Recipe for a basic ice cream that I can make this way please. Thanks Ben!

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you can make a semifreddo, which isn't quite an ice cream, but is similar. I'll look for a basic recipe, or you can just do a search.

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You should be able to take most ice cream recipes and instead of freezing them in an ice cream machine, use a container in the freezer that you stir every 10-15 min until it gets hard.  This will most likely produce larger ice crystals than if made in a machine, but it should be ok.

Ben

If its goign to be a bit coarser because of hand-stirring make a virtue of it and do a sorbet or granite instead!

As an alternative I don't think frozen parfaits need churning because the bubbles in the whipped egg whites mean it doesn't freeze as solid

J

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You should be able to take most ice cream recipes and instead of freezing them in an ice cream machine, use a container in the freezer that you stir every 10-15 min until it gets hard.  This will most likely produce larger ice crystals than if made in a machine, but it should be ok.

Ben

I just made this:

Freezer ice cream:

1 cup milk

1 cup heavy cream

1/2 cup sugar

vanilla or other flavoring as desired

Mix the milk and sugar, stirring until sugar is dissolved. Add the cream and flavoring. Put in a large metal bowl (the larger the bowl, the faster the freeze time), put a whip in it and put in the freezer. Set the timer for 30 minutes.

After the timer goes off, remove and stir, scraping the edges to remove and mix in any ice formations (there may not be any at first). Set the timer again. When the ice starts to build up around the edge, cut back the timer to 15 minutes. When it gets thick, take out the whip and substitute a heavy spoon. When it is as thick as a soft ice cream, scrape into a covered tub, and place in the freezer until solid. Or eat it all soft, like we do.

Stirring time: up to 3 hours.

Variation: chocolate

Place milk in the microwave until hot. Put in the blender with 2 oz chopped bittersweet chocolate. When smooth, pour into the bowl, add cream and vanilla.

Good with bits of homemade marshmallow and toasted sliced almonds, too.

Variation: chocolate chip

When ready to pack into its container, add 2 oz chopped bittersweet chocolate. Mix in, pack and freeze solid.

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How's the texture of the finished produce, Katherine?

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How's the texture of the finished produce, Katherine?

If you didn't call it to their attention, they probably wouldn't notice. No chunks of ice in it. It's so much better than no homemade ice cream.

We can make it in the quantities we need (our old ice cream maker that became non-non-stick was too small, but an old-fashioned ice-and-salt would be too big), with no equipment or planning (aside from the restriction that I need to do it sometime when I'm hanging around the house).

It's lots better than most store-bought ice cream. Besides, it's right at the fat and sugar level I like, so too-sweet store-bought doesn't stand a chance.

It also helps that I was able to make it from fresh local glass-bottled milk and cream.

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I tried this a couple weeks ago and it actually seems to work. You have to use plenty of ice, shake a lot (use potholders - it gets very cold), and the finished product is quite soft, but it was kind of fun. It's better to eat right away since it gets very hard when left in the freezer.

Magic Buttermilk Sorbet

1/2 cup sugar

2 cups buttermilk

1/2 cup salt

2 cups ice

1 quart-size resealable bag

1 gallon-size resealable bag

In the quart-size resealable bag, combine sugar and buttermilk. Seal the bag. In the gallon size resealable bag, combine salt and ice. Insert the smaller bag into the larger one and seal, letting all the air out. Shake continuously for 5 minutes. When buttermilk stiffens, remove the small bag and dip into cold water to remove salt from the outside of the bag. Freeze or serve immediately. To serve, open bag and scoop out sorbet.

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Nightscotsman, I remember making ice cream like that at camp as a child. The shaking-ziplocs method. Brings back fond memories. I also remember making butter in a similar way, and eating it on Ritz crackers. :raz:

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NSM:

Is there a chemical reason why it's buttermilk? Would cream or milk/cream or egg/milk/cream mixtures work as well?

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This is the easiest ice cream you can possibly make. You only need a food processor, and it is ready to eat immediately.

Strawberry/Peach Ice Cream

(also good with raspberries)

Ingredients:

1/2 cup granulated sugar (or to taste)

1 pound strawberries/peaches, STILL FROZEN

1/4 cup milk (ice cold)

1/4 cup heavy cream (ice cold)

1 teaspoon vanilla

Add the sugar to food processor bowl. Run the machine until the sugar is very fine (1-2 minutes, or you can substitute superfine sugar). Add the frozen berries and run until chunky. In a separate measuring cup mix together the milk, cream, and vanilla. With the machine running, slowly add the milk mixture. When blended, the ice cream's ready to eat or store in the freezer.

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I have a Simac IL Gelatio Magnum Ice cream maker and its not working properly. When trying to make sorbet or ice cream it never finishes churning..Obviously the cooling part is broken somehow? Has anyone ever had this problem with this machine and know how to get it fixed ? Thanks

patrick

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I have a Simac IL Gelatio Magnum Ice cream maker and its not working properly. When trying to make sorbet or ice cream it never finishes churning..Obviously the cooling part is broken somehow? Has anyone ever had this problem with this machine and know how to get it fixed ? Thanks

patrick

I heard recently that Simac will be bought by De'Longhi for the US market. Has anyone heard that?

They may be coming out with some newer products. Hence, I am holding off on buying a machine.

I have had to make ice cream using my food processor and stand mixer in the interim. The product that I end up with is nice. But I wish I had a nice ice cream maker.

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I tried this a couple weeks ago and it actually seems to work. You have to use plenty of ice, shake a lot (use potholders - it gets very cold), and the finished product is quite soft, but it was kind of fun. It's better to eat right away since it gets very hard when left in the freezer.

Magic Buttermilk Sorbet

1/2 cup sugar

2 cups buttermilk

1/2 cup salt

2 cups ice

1 quart-size resealable bag

1 gallon-size resealable bag

In the quart-size resealable bag, combine sugar and buttermilk. Seal the bag. In the gallon size resealable bag, combine salt and ice. Insert the smaller bag into the larger one and seal, letting all the air out. Shake continuously for 5 minutes. When buttermilk stiffens, remove the small bag and dip into cold water to remove salt from the outside of the bag. Freeze or serve immediately. To serve, open bag and scoop out sorbet.

You're right, nightscotsman - it is a bit soft. I actually put in more ice and shook the bag for 10 continuous minutes because at five minutes, I still had liquid. But it was delicious! I made half a batch and I added about a tablespoon of heavy cream and a couple drops of vanilla. Great experiment! I wonder what would happen if I added more ice and added 5 more minutes . . . hmmm.

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Is there a chemical reason why it's buttermilk?  Would cream or milk/cream  or egg/milk/cream mixtures work as well?

Well, the buttermilk does make it thicker to start with, but I think it's mostly a flavor and ease thing (just two ingredients). I'm sure the method was developed for kids. Probably anything would work, though some mixtures will take longer to freeze.

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i've still got an old donvier i got 20 years ago as a partial payment on a cooking class i was teaching. problem is: the thing has never worked right. it never froze completely. it would get thick and slushy, but then i'd have to switch it to the freezer to "ripen" to get it hard. anyone else have any experience with this machine? are other "freezer compartment" machines any different? (the ones that you put hte chemical sleeve in the freezer to provide chill).

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I own a knock off of a Krups machine called a Maverick which has the canister that you put in the freezer and my experience has been the same as yours. I resorted at one point to running the machine in the freezer to try to get it to work. The only way I have gotten it to sort of work is to chill the mixture virtually to freezing by putting the mixture in a bowl in the freezer (ie. mixture begins to freeze around the edges) before putting the mixture in the ice cream machine. It still requires some post churning freezing to set up completely but gets pretty close.

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I have an old Donvier 1 pint machine that I got when they first came out. Works great for me, but you have to make sure your freezer is at or near the coldest temperature setting. I find it works best if you give the handle a couple cranks right after you pour in the mix, then let it sit for 5 minutes to freeze a layer on the sides. Crank a few more times to scrape the solid part off, let rest to freeze again and repeat. after about 20-30 minutes of this I usually have a thick soft-serve consistency.

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You should be able to take most ice cream recipes and instead of freezing them in an ice cream machine, use a container in the freezer that you stir every 10-15 min until it gets hard.  This will most likely produce larger ice crystals than if made in a machine, but it should be ok.

Ben

If its goign to be a bit coarser because of hand-stirring make a virtue of it and do a sorbet or granite instead!

As an alternative I don't think frozen parfaits need churning because the bubbles in the whipped egg whites mean it doesn't freeze as solid

J

if you want your parfait to attain some similarity to a real ice cream, don't whip the cream (hey, you wrote egg whites??!!??) very much (that is, to the consistency of a creme anglaise). you will have to churn every 15 min., though, but at least won't have to make a creme anglaise (and i for one can't make a creme anglaise if there's anyone around in the kitchen to disturb me).

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I made the buttermilk sorbet using my scrape'n'stir method. I also made (at the same time) a batch of 50% buttermilk 50% sour cream. The one containing sour cream froze more quickly. The buttermilk one is tasty, but I prefer the texture of the sour cream one, which tastes almost cheesecake-like. (Buttermilk feels powdery in my mouth.)

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I have a question about making Butter Pecan Icecream. I have tried a couple of recipes, but the butter just separates out and when you eat it you end up with all the butter just sticking to the roof of your mouth. How can I prevent this from happening? Thanks.

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I have a question about making Butter Pecan Icecream. I have tried a couple of recipes, but the butter just separates out and when you eat it you end up with all the butter just sticking to the roof of your mouth. How can I prevent this from happening? Thanks.

When I add butter to something like this, 1st I would whisk it in and the use an immersion blender to emulsify it, or just immersion blend in the 1st pace.

Do it with the mix hot and the butter very cold.

Not knowing what your base is like, ing. wise, it's kind of hard to figure out too.

also, are you using a lot of butter?

Finaaly, in Butter pecan I/C, or in the Pecan Praline ice cream I make, I use salted butter most of the time, or definately season my mix with salt after I add the butter.

It makes the flavour come up.

Good Luck!

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I have a question about making Butter Pecan Icecream. I have tried a couple of recipes, but the butter just separates out and when you eat it you end up with all the butter just sticking to the roof of your mouth. How can I prevent this from happening? Thanks.

I had the same problem with the first batch of butter pecan ice cream that I made - it was quite yucky as the butter had a horrid mouth-feel. I tried another recipe and it worked much, much better and has become a favourite now. Unfortunately the recipe is on my own computer which is undergoing service - as soon as I get it back I will try to remember to post a link to the recipe (or I may have to re-create it here mindful of copyright rules!

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Thanks for your replies, Ted and Anna.

And forgive my ignorance, but what does "immersion emulsify" mean?

And I use about 2 tblsp butter for a 1 litre mix.

I just tried another recipe the other day, and I was sure it would fail, since the butter was floating at the top of the mixture before I put it in the machine. However, in this batch I didn't have the problem I described. Having said that, it didn't taste a bit like butter pecan ice cream either, and is essentially just vanilla ice cream.

I would love to get the recipe you have, Anna. I never knew butter pecan ice cream existed until I recenlty visited the USA. We don't have such a flavour down here in Australia, so my only hope is that I can make my own. I will look forward to it once your computer is back up and running. Thanks!

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I'm afraid that you probably won't get a true butter flavor in your ice cream without using some kind of butter extract or flavoring. Several of our recipes in school used melted butter instead of cream - a LOT of melted butter - for the butterfat portion of the formula, and they did not taste like butter at all.

The fat coating your mouth issue is basically a too much fat problem. If you take a normal, balanced ice cream recipe and just add butter, there will be too much fat and it will be impossible to emulsify it with the water without some added chemical emulsifyers. So when the ice cream melts in your mouth, the water and fat melt separately - the water drains away from the fat leaving you with a mouth full of butter.

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immersion blender is one of those stick blenders, Braun, Krups, Cusineart make them.

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