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Sweet preserves in South America


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My friend just returned from Brasil & Argentina.

She brought me a jar of Mermelada de Rosella.

The ever helpful free translator gives back the obvious "Rosella jam".

The picture on the front looks like some kind of flower bud possibly.

What is mermelada de rosella made of ?

Thank you, no, there is no ingredient list on the jar :wink:.

What other jams/jellies/preserves ardo you think are worth searching out on a visit south?

"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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Take another look at the label. It might say grosella. I have never had the marmalade, but one of my nieces made me eat some of the sour, little berries just for her amusement.

Grosella.

-- Jeff

"I don't care to belong to a club that accepts people like me as members." -- Groucho Marx

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I'd agree, more likely that it's grosella - which are currants. That, or it's some local version from wherever your friend got it of the very common and popular "rosa mosqueta" which are rose hips, or rosebuds.

Other good choices for marmalades from "the south" - ruibarbo (rhubarb), sauco (elderberry), calafate (barberry). And then there are the "dulces" - which are preserves made from interesting fruits and vegetables like batata (sweet potato), alcayote (cayote), membrillo (quince).

SaltShaker - Casting a little flavor (and a few aspersions) on the world of food, drink, and life

Casa SaltShaker - Restaurant de Puertas Cerradas

Spanish-English-Spanish Food & Wine Dictionary - a must for any traveler!

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Thanks for the input.

Perhaps its a brandname. There is clearly no G. It is rosella.

A nice rich reddish color. Tasted a bit like jamaica.

I'm going to have to photograph the label i think. Its got a picture of something that almost looks like flower buds on it.

Is rosella ever used as a term for hibiscus blossoms? (My on-line translator had no idea what to do with the word).

Chayote sweet... hmmmmm.

"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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Hibiscus is hibisco in Spanish. But doing a google search I see that rosella is used in reference to hibiscus flowers here and there, just not in Spanish. Possibly the label simply isn't using a Spanish name.

SaltShaker - Casting a little flavor (and a few aspersions) on the world of food, drink, and life

Casa SaltShaker - Restaurant de Puertas Cerradas

Spanish-English-Spanish Food & Wine Dictionary - a must for any traveler!

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  • 1 year later...
My friend just returned from Brasil & Argentina.

She brought me a jar of Mermelada de Rosella.

The ever helpful free translator gives back the obvious "Rosella jam".

The picture on the front looks like some kind of flower bud possibly.

What is mermelada de rosella made of ?

Thank you, no, there is no ingredient list on the jar :wink:.

What other jams/jellies/preserves ardo you think are worth searching out on a visit south?

It is made from the dried flowers of Hibiscus sabdariffa. It is known in Mexico as "flor de jamaica" and is served in a sweetened infusion, chilled and iced, as agua de jamaica. It is known as "roselle" on the island of Jamaica, whence it's (generalizing here) South American and Mexican names derive: "rosella/roselle" and "jamaica." It is also the "red" in Red Zinger tea.

Jamaica/Roselle/Rosella is purchased dried, by the ounce/pound or gram/kilo. Toss roughly a large handful into approx a quart/liter of boiling water, simmer 5 minutes, cover, and remove from the heat. Allow to steep. Strain and sweeten to taste.

As for the jam, you will either need to utilize pectin or combine the flowers with a pectin-rich fruit, such as apples ... especially crab apples (which may necessitate additional sweetening).

Regards,

Theabroma

It has a very tart, spicy flavor, and is rich in vitamins A & C ... aside from being very refreshing.

Sharon Peters aka "theabroma"

The lunatics have overtaken the asylum

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