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Andrew Shotts v. Jean Pierre Wybauw


jturn00
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I recently saw on the ICE culinary CAPS course list that both Andrew Shotts and Jean Pierre Wybauw (JPW) are teaching clases.  I know that many people have taken JPW's class.  Any comments on how that might compare to Andrew Shotts class?

Here is the link to the course descriptions.

http://www.iceculinary.com/professional/caps.shtml

Jeff

Hello,

In order to answer that question, let me know what your expectations are from taking a chocolate class in general and what your previous experience is.

I took both Schotts class and Wybauw class at the Notter school. So tell us what your experirence is, what you are looking to get out of a chocolate class and I'll tell you, FROM MY PERSONAL EXPERIENCE, which one might be up your alley!

Take care.

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I have taken some professional cooking and pastry classes along with a chocolate class at the French Culinary Institute and I have some real kitchen experience in both pastry and culinary. I have been making chocolates for my personal use and not for sale.

I was trying to see if their courses tend to refelect their knowldege in their books. I might find information on shelf life useful. Also, I would use the class to practice...... Tempering, using luster dusts, painting with coco colors and molding chocolates. (using an enrober would be interesting but probably not useful since I don't work with one and have to hand dip my chocolates squares.)

Initially, I was tending towards the wybauw class due to some of the posts here on egullet, but I might not be able to find the time in september. That is when I saw andrew Shott's class. I need to reveiw his book.

Thanks for all the feedback and information.

Jeff

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from what i understand, schotts' class tends to be very specific to his style and most of the work is done for you. wybauw's class will definitely include many more styles and techniques.

with wybauw's class, there will be discussion of tempering (theory, methods, etc), but you probably won't be doing any actual tempering yourself due to time contraints. the chocolate is going to be held in warmers at temper for the duration of the class.

in wybauw's class, we used an enrober and hand dipped.

i think sote23 would have more information on the schotts' class as he took it earlier this year.

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I won't comment on Wybauw's class because I haven't taken it yet.

As to Schott's class:

-He gave us great recipes to learn from and build on. Working in teams of two we were all given several recipes to work on, but he then went through all of them with the group

-He talked about enrobing chocolates, and we got to work with an enrobing machine, as well as cutting with a guitar, and using transfer sheets/structure sheets.

-We went through filling truffle shells and finishing them

-He demonstrated airbrushing techniques and filling molds.

-We learned about different types of packaging and how to make it all look attractive.

-We made marzipan

-He demonstrated panning

-He did demonstrations based on our questions. Anyone who wanted to try something hands on, got to.

There was a lot packed into a 3 day class. He was very available to answer any and all questions. I'd say that there was a range of experience from not very, to chocolate practitioners and store owners. He said his book was geared more to home chefs. The recipes we got to work with were for professionals.

If you need more info, fell free to contact me.

Cheri

www.cheri-pie.com

Life is too short. Eat good chocolate.

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I have taken some professional cooking and pastry classes along with a chocolate class at the French Culinary Institute and I have some real kitchen experience in both pastry and culinary. I have been making chocolates for my personal use and not for sale. 

I was trying to see if their courses tend to refelect their knowldege in their books.  I might find information on shelf life useful.  Also, I would use the class to practice...... Tempering, using luster dusts, painting with coco colors and molding chocolates.  (using an enrober would be interesting but probably not useful since I don't work with one and have to hand dip my chocolates squares.)

Initially, I was tending towards the wybauw class due to some of the posts here on egullet, but I might not be able to find the time in september.  That is when I saw andrew Shott's class.  I need to reveiw his book. 

Thanks for all the feedback and information.

Jeff

I would take either class since it seems you are more constricted by timing than anything else. Schotts is a great chocolatier, perhaps one of the best in the US, so a chance to learn from him is not something to pass up.

Wybauw is about the fundamentals, theory plus application, from his book, 'fine chocolates.' Schotts is geared a bit more to banging out recipes, seeing how to make certain interesting types of ganaches, such as dual layers, etc.

So if you can only take one, and are not a professional chocolatier, I would go for Schotts, Wybauw is more of a professional class, i.e. I think if you come to his class with questions, then it makes a huge difference on what you take from it.

As for shelf life, Schotts gives you a good way to freeze your chocolates, which I think might be what you are interested in doing, rather than using formulas to squeeze out more shelf life, on the shelf, as it were, which is what Wybauw is a master at.

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