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suzilightning

eG Foodblog: suzilightning

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Good morning, all! Welcome back to New Jersey.

The 34B in the description is not my bra size but the exit off of Rt. 80 where I live in the northern part of the state.

Now for a very sad,sad sight

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empty toast dope containers


Edited by suzilightning (log)

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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Saturday morning and I am trying to hold the crowds back at work but first I really needed breakfast after waking up at 3am so it was off to my favorite place. I have to limit myself to once a week here. I like the fact that they use organic products and fair trade coffee.

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Breakfast

gallery_403_5043_73686.jpg

Iced mocha with a blueberry pocket


Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

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I was going to stop on my way to work this morning to take some pictures but we are currently experiencing our seventh day of drizzle/rain/clouds.

Work for me is here

gallery_403_5013_202522.jpg

I am entering my 28th year as a professional librarian and have worked in such diverse places as Hudson, NY and Texarkana, TX/AK. I have been a director, worked as an audio-visual librarian, worked in a psychiatric hospital and now have found my metier - reference librarian.

One thing about librarians that is almost universal - we love food. Not everyone likes making it but we do love eating it. As I type the boss is downstairs frothing up her morning cappachino. We also regularly have "Soup"er Wednesdays in the fall and winter when staff memebers take turns bringing in soup and bread. Our staff is also diverse with people from France, Vietnam and China rounding out our culinary background.

Well, things are beginning to hop around here so I'm off. Please ask about anything you might be interested in...now that I've stopped shaking I think I can get my fingers to type straight.


Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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Saturday morning and I am trying to hold the crowds back at work but first I really needed breakfast after waking up at 3am so it was off to my favorite place.  I have to limit myself to once a week here.  I like the fact that they use organic products and fair trade coffee.

gallery_403_5043_717460.jpg

OMG - I live somewhat in your neck of the woods (central Sussex County near Rt 206). Have passed this coffee place on the way down to Route 80 numerous times and have always wanted to go in. Now I will. Really looking forward to reading this. So glad I recently signed on to egullet.

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I hope you'll show us a photo of the interior of your library, suzi. Most particularly the cookbook section. :biggrin:

I've often thought that it would be a nice topic to have photos posted (like the thread on refrigerator and cupboard contents) of our various libraries' cookbook sections. :laugh:

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Good Morning, Suzi!!

I, too, have been prowling in search of caffeine since about three, so we coulda had a little chat. I'm so glad it's you!!! The view from your window is one I could LIVE with forever---my little garden has been neglected all this hot, dry month, but these last few days of rain have given it and me a new lease on life. If it would work, I'd take this picture outside and flash it around.

"Now, see---THAT'S what we've been working for!!!" Just beautiful.

More, please.

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You could always get the ball rolling in Cookbooks & References, Karen. (Which reminds me: Should I post a photo of my condiments?)

Greetings, kinda-sorta-neighbor! Though you're in the "New York" part of the state rather than the "Philadelphia" part, I trust that we will see some tomatoes during this blog? After all, they're in season. And speaking of Jersey tomatoes, have you all heard that Rutgers is atoning for the sins of the past?

So you've only posted twice, and I already have a couple of questions:

What town's library is that? Is it the town you live in? If not, where do you live? (BTW, cute play on the old joke: "You live in New Jersey? What exit?")

And what is toast dope? What goes into it? Do you need to butter the bread before applying it?

Blog on!


Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

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Howdy neighbor! Exlt 59 here.

I too am curious as to where you work & why you have to get up at 3 am to get there.


Thank God for tea! What would the world do without tea? How did it exist? I am glad I was not born before tea!

- Sydney Smith, English clergyman & essayist, 1771-1845

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Good Morning SUZZZZZIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII,

I've been waiting for this day to happen. V and I will be reading this with bated breathe.

Is that he Smart World Coffe on Rte 15? I haven't tried it yet, as living in Morristown is one more reason to avoid 15 :biggrin:

Tom


I want food and I want it now

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OMG - I live somewhat in your neck of the woods (central Sussex County near Rt 206). Have passed this coffee place on the way down to Route 80 numerous times and have always wanted to go in. Now I will. Really looking forward to reading this. So glad I recently signed on to egullet.


Edited by suzilightning (log)

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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Howdy neighbor! Exlt 59 here.

I too am curious as to where you work & why you have to get up at 3 am to get there.

I'm curious about why you say that librarians especially enjoy food, as that's an association I wouldn't have made.

Interesting but everywhere I have worked food and books - and wine- have always been important. In fact when I was hired the director's first question for me was "What is your specialty?" not meaning what did I do best in my professional life but what food was I known for. We regularly have luncheon here with various staff contributing dishes. We are thinking about doing a series of cooking demos and tie them in with both nonfiction and fiction. As it is we have staff members from France, Vietnam, China and Texas on staff. Our next book talk is Celia Rivenbark's "We're Just Like You Only Prettier". I'm making the pimento cheese for part of the refreshments. As I'm standing here the director and children's person are drooling over the menu at AIX Brasserie.

Is that he Smart World Coffe on Rte 15? I haven't tried it yet, as living in Morristown is one more reason to avoid 15

Tom, he has a second store in Morristown.


Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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Q:  I'm curious about why you say that librarians especially enjoy food, as that's an association I wouldn't have made.

A:  Interesting but everywhere I have worked food and books - and wine- have always been important.  In fact when I was hired the director's first question for me was "What is your specialty?" not meaning what did I do best in my professional life but what food was I known for.  We regularly have luncheon here with various staff contributing dishes.  We are thinking about doing a series of cooking demos and tie them in with both nonfiction and fiction.  As it is we have staff members from France, Vietnam, China and Texas on staff.  Our next book talk is Celia Rivenbark's "We're Just Like You Only Prettier".  I'm making the pimento cheese for part of the refreshments.  As I'm standing here the director and children's person are drooling over the menu at AIX Brasserie.

When you think about it, the acts of reading and eating have a lot in common. :wink:

The word, "digest", for instance .... :wink:

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Any time I move to a new place the first place I go to is the public library. Then I check out some cookbooks and while they are being checked out I say "This is such a good cookbook. Its recipe for so-and-so is the best I've ever seen."

And the librarian's face lights up and I've made my first friend in town. :smile:

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Good Morning SUZZZZZIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII,

I've been waiting for this day to happen. V and I will be reading this with bated breathe.

Is that he Smart World Coffe on Rte 15? I haven't tried it yet, as living in Morristown is one more reason to avoid 15  :biggrin:

Tom

Um, baited breath? Isn't that the results of eating sushi? :raz: (Runs away, very fast...) :laugh:


"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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I have always enjoyed your posts, so I am looking forward to this foodblog. I hope you don’t mind my asking a food-related library question. While checking out our library’s cookbook section, I noted a comprehensive mixture of new and classic European and American regional cookbooks, a fair number of Japanese, Mexican, and Indian cookbooks, and a large section aimed at special diets. In contrast, the coverage of China and “elsewhere in Asia/Pacific” was paltry and outdated.

It appears that the library bought a bunch of Thai, Vietnamese, Chinese, and Korean cookbooks 15 years ago. Presumably, no one could find suitable ingredients locally so few borrowed the books. We now have an Asian grocery in town, so I would like to gently suggest that interest in Chinese and SE Asian cookbooks may have increased.

To whom would one make such a suggestion most effectively?

Oh, and I do hope we will see a tutorial on toast dope preparation.

Blog on!

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Good Morning SUZZZZZIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII,

I've been waiting for this day to happen. V and I will be reading this with bated breathe.

Is that he Smart World Coffe on Rte 15? I haven't tried it yet, as living in Morristown is one more reason to avoid 15  :biggrin:

Tom

Um, baited breath? Isn't that the results of eating sushi? :raz: (Runs away, very fast...) :laugh:

I'm guessing you're right coz sushi was fro dinner last night :biggrin:


I want food and I want it now

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I hope you'll show us a photo of the interior of your library, suzi. Most particularly the cookbook section.  :biggrin:

I've often thought that it would be a nice topic to have photos posted (like the thread on refrigerator  and cupboard contents) of our various libraries' cookbook sections.  :laugh:

Here you go, Karen.

gallery_403_5013_29805.jpg

I counted. 35 shelves of cookbooks.

The main rooms: children's and the reading room

gallery_403_5013_24379.jpg

In the winter we turn the chairs towards the fireplace, remove the flag and have a cheerful gas fire going.

My area - reference

gallery_403_5013_11886.jpg

Our full service kitchen and fridge photos for Sandy.

gallery_403_5013_22796.jpg

gallery_403_5013_10534.jpg


Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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I have always enjoyed your posts, so I am looking forward to this foodblog. I hope you don’t mind my asking a food-related library question. While checking out our library’s cookbook section, I noted a comprehensive mixture of new and classic European and American regional cookbooks, a fair number of Japanese, Mexican, and Indian cookbooks, and a large section aimed at special diets. In contrast, the coverage of China and “elsewhere in Asia/Pacific” was paltry and outdated.

It appears that the library bought a bunch of Thai, Vietnamese, Chinese, and Korean cookbooks 15 years ago. Presumably, no one could find suitable ingredients locally so few borrowed the books. We now have an Asian grocery in town, so I would like to gently suggest that interest in Chinese and SE Asian cookbooks may have increased.

To whom would one make such a suggestion most effectively?

Oh, and I do hope we will see a tutorial on toast dope preparation.

Blog on!

Thank you for the kind words. I was so worried that after Kathleen's blog no one would really want to hear about an older middle aged librarian from North Jersey.

When you are at the circulation desk ask if they have request forms. We have them at all manned desks. Most libraries you can make a subject request or request an individual title. Usually there are people who purchase in the major areas: Reference(me), Adult Fiction(Deanna), Adult Non-Fiction(Diane, our Assistant Director), Chidren's(the redhead in the picture of the Children's Room, Lyn) and Young Adult(Peggy). You might also ask to speak to that person. It will also depend on the collection policy your library has but at least here we try to shape the collection for our users.

As for the Toast Dope demo...that will be done by my spouse of 25 years. Yes, the one, the only Johnnybird of Toast Dope Fame. And he will have to do it soon. I used the last of the dope making Peach Blueberry Kucken for his breakfasts.


Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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Snowangel mentioned that I had asked for these days though they aren't falling in the regular blogging days. I had my reasons.

#1 was so I could take you to the Farmer's Market in Lafayette, NJ tomorrow morning. I have been going there for the last 4 years or so and it is bringing me back to how I ate growing up on eastern Long Island. We hunted and fished, foraged and grew. Now up here in northern New Jersey I no longer hunt or fish and I have a black - not brown the color of earth - thumb so my foraging is now done here. I'm lucky enough to have the money to support these local farmers with my purchasing power and have made some good friends. But tomorrow will be my last day till next June - unless it rains like crazy.

That is because of #2. Beginning 1 September and until 30 November I spend any time I am not at work counting migrating raptors at the Picatinny Peak Hawkwatch that John founded. We are now in our 14th year of full time migration counts and report our data to various organizations such as Hawk Migration Association of North America, The Department of Defense, Partners in Flight andThe Raptor Population Index. From some of the analysis we are noticing a trend of declining populations among species such as kestral. Why? We aren't sure yet but the major conference this fall will include some research.

#3 fits in with the teaser photo. I'm surprised no one recognized the Birthday Tiara. The bottle of champagne - or one just like it- will be busted open when I get back from work Thursday night. We will be going out to dinner to celebrate, though, at a little restaurant close to our house calledZoe's by the Lake. We like it because John can have two drinks and still be able to drive home.

Thank you all for your questions and kind words. When I started typing this morning I was actually shaking... now it's off to the gym. Then I need to figure out what to make in the heat we are now experiencing.


Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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Niiiiiice selection of cookbooks, suzi. I'll take photos of our library's cookbook section and start a thread soon, probably after I get a new camera, for my own digital camera has been hijacked by my fifteen year old daughter and it takes a minor coup with much strategic planning involved to try to get it back when I want it.

I'll also find out what our population here is for comparison of cookbook-to-person ratio. :biggrin:

Bruce, we had a minimal Asian cookbook section in our library also but over the last few years I've requested purchase of some of my favorite Asian cookbooks, particularly new releases, and have been quite pleased to see that generally within three months the book appears on the shelves. Which doesn't help me much, for by that time I've usually not been able to stand it and have already bought the thing :sad: but it's good to know that other people will have access. :wink:

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I am a eternally grateful to you for the "toast dope" formula. It's one of my favorite eGullet recipes. Looking forward to your blog this week. :smile:


Heather Johnson

In Good Thyme

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suzi, the location of your home is beautiful, as is your library.........I raced to join ours when new to England, *shock*, no cookbooks, well actually very few books at all,......and each time someone posts about asking their library for a cookbook I get depressed.....can you believe that Hong Kong has a much better library system than England!!(hope that doesn't upset anyone).... we also live right on a bird migration/wetlands area but not many birds of prey( the odd buzzard and owl). Nonetheless a remote and lovely spot. Looking forward very much to sharing a bit of your life. (am immediately going to try to convert from vegemite to toast dope :smile: )

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Two months of raptor rapture. Oh my!

Your yard is beautiful.

What kind of lunches do you take with you when counting birds?


"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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suzi, the location of your home is beautiful, as is your library.........I raced to join ours when new to England, *shock*, no cookbooks, well actually very few books at all,......and each time someone posts about asking their library for a cookbook I get depressed.....can you believe that Hong Kong has a much better library system than England!!(hope that doesn't upset anyone).... we also live right on a bird migration/wetlands area but not many birds of prey( the odd buzzard and owl). Nonetheless a remote and lovely spot. Looking forward very much to sharing a bit of your life. (am immediately going to try to convert from vegemite to toast dope :smile: )

unfortunately, England has been less than kind with supporting their public libraries and it is well documented in the professional media. The director and I were having a discussion of the future of libraries in our state this morning. she feels that within the next 20-30 the tax base (1/3 of a millage - a set amount based on population and budget) will be gone and we may have gone the way of California after Propostion 13. Prop 13 froze property taxes and immediately impacted libraries there.

Actually where you are you are on a good migration path for cranes that winter a bit further south of you .


Edited by suzilightning (log)

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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