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16 Qt. glass mixing bowl


markk
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A friend needs to know where she can buy "an immense 16 quart glass or ceramic mixing bowl, for bread dough", and I'm hoping my fellow gulleteers will know where she can by such an item.

Thanks!

Overheard at the Zabar’s prepared food counter in the 1970’s:

Woman (noticing a large bowl of cut fruit): “How much is the fruit salad?”

Counterman: “Three-ninety-eight a pound.”

Woman (incredulous, and loud): “THREE-NINETY EIGHT A POUND ????”

Counterman: “Who’s going to sit and cut fruit all day, lady… YOU?”

Newly updated: my online food photo extravaganza; cook-in/eat-out and photos from the 70's

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16 quarts, that is 4 gallons, that is pretty big. Almost a 5 gallon plastic bucket. What are they making? Are they a commercial bakery? I have never seen a glass bowl that large unless it is one of those very special things created by a glass artist and worth a ton of money.

It is good to be a BBQ Judge.  And now it is even gooder to be a Steak Cookoff Association Judge.  Life just got even better.  Woo Hoo!!!

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here I am repeating things... but that sounds TOO heavy!

4 gal. bowls can probably be procured from a resto supply dealer. Here in BC, most of them have a "cash & carry" desk, and showroom. "regular" people can buy there, too.

Personally, I can't imagine trying to carry the bowl, full of anything.

On the other hand, as a base for some sort of awesome flower arrangement... WOW

Karen Dar Woon

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Is your friend looking for a bowl to actually mix the dough or for proofing? I agree with the others that glass or ceramic would be too heavy and prone to breakage. Large round or rectangular plastic tubs are available at restaurant supply shops. A friend of mine uses clear plastic rectangular tubs from Wal-mart to proof large quantities of bread dough. I've used them to mix and proof dough for breads that require minimal kneading (just folding, a la Dan Lepard's technique.)

Ilene

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