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Techniques for Lamb Ribs and Breast


Chris Amirault
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Are these the same ribs that are on the back side of the $ .99 lamb breast at my supermarket?

tracey

The great thing about barbeque is that when you get hungry 3 hours later....you can lick your fingers

Maxine

Avoid cutting yourself while slicing vegetables by getting someone else to hold them while you chop away.

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I ended up modifying this recipe from Mark Bittman

It was delicious. He doesn't specify, but I cut apart the ribs and found a few lamb neck bones in my freezer that I also tossed in. The amount of whole spices is fantastic. I did not remove the spices after the braising, rather I removed the lamb and poured off most of the fat. This was very easy to do as it had separated, leaving behind spices.

I also didn't bother crisping up the fat, but now that I've read all these comments extolling the deliciousness I will next time and serve sauce on the side.

I then thought I'd make it into a sauce. I added in a 2 tablspoons of butter and 2 Tbsp flour, stirred for a bit and slowly added in some milk until I reached a gravy consistency. Might sound odd, but it was fantastic after I had corrected the seasoning.

This recipe is a keeper. I think it would also be great with bone-in chicken thighs

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Food Muse,

Glad you liked MB's recipe. Just to be a tiny nitpicker, because the recipes originate in a very ancient community that today is being wiped off the face of the earth by the determined actions of a large group of genocidal terrorists ably succored by more than one nation and billions of petrodollars: when fried, the ribs are properly called KABARGAH. When baked in unglazed clay dishes to soak up the fat, they are called TABAK MAAS.

The signature Kashmiri Brahman flavors are powdered dry ginger, [not fresh, a very different note altogether] and powdered fennel. Garlic and onions are eschewed, asafetida taking their place. The recipes I gave and presumably the one by MB originate in the Kashmiri Pandit kitchen.

Kashmiri Muslim cookery avoids asafetida, using an emulsion of Kashmiri shallots and fried onions mashed in water.

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I just popped some not very meaty beef ribs (S&P only) and some lamb breast (packaged Gyro Seasoning and foil wrapped) into a 225 oven....then they will all go onto the grill for finishing for dinner later

Yummy

tracey

The great thing about barbeque is that when you get hungry 3 hours later....you can lick your fingers

Maxine

Avoid cutting yourself while slicing vegetables by getting someone else to hold them while you chop away.

"It is the government's fault, they've eaten everything."

My Webpage

garden state motorcyle association

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  • 2 years later...

I've got a lamb ribs recipe here. Tried it a couple of times. Calls for the fat on racks of lamb ribs to be scored. Make a paste with crushed garlic, salt, thyme, lemon zest, lemon juice and olive oil. Rub said paste into said scored ribs. Roast at 150C for ~1 hour. I guess you could get all fancy and sous vide it then finish it on a BBQ or something.

Chris Taylor

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I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

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  • 3 months later...

I'm organizing a little my files and since I made these this week, I decided to post.

lambribs.jpg

The recipe comes from Odd bits. I cooked the ribs on a grill on a roasting tin, covered, for 2 hours, then glazed. I think they are very nice.

I tried the recipe from Mark Bittman and it really didn't work for me.

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Lately I've been slow roasting (3-4 hours, tightly foil-covered, unseasoned, 185-200f oven) lamb beast. After cooling, pull meat from bones like you would pulled pork. Meat shreds freeze well, used last night in tacos. Later this week I'll use for shepherd's pie.

Bob Libkind aka "rlibkind"

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  • 7 months later...

Somehow, more than a dozen lamb briskets / breasts found their way into our freezer. These all have the ribs (what we would call Denver ribs) attached to a good chunk of meat/fat. I've taken some notes from this topic, but was wondering if there were any more ideas for the meatier part of this cut. I've made ribs plenty of times, but I've never had them with the brisket attached.

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Consider stuffing the breasts on the rib cage (épigramme d'agneau). Delicately cut a passage through the meat, against the bones, fill with a forcemeat (bound with bread/egg/cream) garnished with whatever, fill the cavity using a sausage press or pastry bag and roast after a gently sear. Cool, cut and reheat using the accumulated juices.

Niçoise olives, pistachios, fatback, lamb kidney, liver and heart.

8013770570_e9912d10e7_z.jpg

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  • 2 years later...

We have quite a few packages of lamb ribs in the freezer so I decided to try a recipe that I have had for awhile.  Don't know where I got it.

I first trimmed as much of the fat off as I could and saved any meaty bits.  Then got the Moo Glue out of the freezer and glued those bits back on the ribs (4 rib pieces).  Next they were rubbed with the marinade which was made of the following ingredients and put in the fridge overnight for the glue to do it's magic.

1 tablespoon salt,

6 cloves garlic, peeled and finely diced

6 sprigs thyme, chopped
3 sprigs rosemary, chopped
2 bay leaves, crumbled
 
They were baked at 275F for 3 hours, turned after 1.5 hours.  
 
The glaze is made of the following but I only made 1/2 the amount as it looked like a lot.  The butter is whisked in after the other ingredients are reduced to 1/2 the original volume.
 
1 cup sherry vinegar
1 cup honey
1 tablespoon fennel seeds, cracked
1 tablespoon coriander seeds, cracked
1 tablespoon ground freshly ground black pepper
1 tablespoon ground Aleppo chili
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, cold
 
Next the sprinkle for the top was made from 
 
2 tablespoons coriander seeds, toasted and cracked
2 teaspoons Aleppo chili
2 teaspoons Kosher salt, or to taste
Zest of 1 lemon
1 tablespoon parsley, finely chopped
 
After the ribs were baked, they were cut into individual ribs, tossed in the glaze then broiled for 7 minutes about 6 inches from the element and then moved up to 1 inch from the element for one more minute to get them nice and brown.  They were sprinkled with the 'sprinkle'.  I forgot to take a picture of the whole plate full.  The last picture is my test rib pulled apart without the sprinkle.
 
There were seriously good and really not that fatty.  They disappeared in a matter of minutes.
 
 
 
 

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I love lamb ribs. It's a pain that I have to preorder from the butcher when I want them as they don't usually have them available. I usually just steam the racks until tender, then cut them into individual ribs, put on a dry rub (cumin/garlic as main flavors) and put them under the broiler. Now that we have a BBQ, I'll have to try them grilled.

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I don't think I have ever seen lamb ribs in our grocery stores or butchers here either.  We get whole lambs which is why we have them in the freezer.

How long do you steam them?  Does a lot of fat render out by steaming?  The recipe called for grilling mine but seeing the grill is under a foot of snow, I went the broiler route which got them nice and crisp without any flare ups.

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In France, I used to do lamb belly often because they were easy to find and cheap. I've done many times a recipe from Jennifer McLagan in Odd Bits where she steams (in the oven) for 1.5 hours and then she broils in tamarind glaze.

 

Also, one time I was short of time and I pressure cooked the lamb ribs for 30 minutes (inside a bowl on a trivet). Then glazed the single ribs with a char siu marinade. Not bad at all. Here a picture.

 

Next time I'll try to marinade them following your recipe.

Edited by Franci (log)
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Franci, your ribs look delicious and the prep method seems very easy/quick.

I had extra glaze in the broiling sheet pan so I poured it into a little serving bowl and served it as an extra dipping sauce.  We had grill homemade crusty bread with the ribs which worked well.

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I simmer separated ribs until tender (10-20 minutes, depending on size, animal, etc.) then put on grill, either with dry rub or, more frequently, a sweet glaze (try orange marmalade with fresh ground cumin!), cooking just til they have a nice char.

Edited by rlibkind (log)
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Bob Libkind aka "rlibkind"

Robert's Market Report

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I steam it in my rice cooker. I don't pay too much attention to the time. I say it let it steam for about 45 minutes to an hour, as long as they are tender. I don't recall a lot of fat being rendered while steaming. More fat is released when broiled.

 

One of the butchers usually has lamb ribs, already cut into individual ribs. I have to preorder if I want the rack whole.

Edited by annachan (log)
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I think Okanagancook did a much better job at cleaning the ribs. We like fat.

 

This time I marinated the ribs overnight with garlic, rosemary, oil and salt. 

 

pancia di agnello00001.jpeg

 

I lift them on a grill and poured some boiling water at the bottom. Covered with foil and steamed in the oven at 325 F (160C) for 1 hour and half.

 

I decided to stay in the Mediterranean zone. So I made a paste with garlic, rosemary, a couple anchovies and extra virgin olive oil and basted my ribs under my broiler (it's the thing I love most of my stove!)

 

pancia di agnello00002.jpeg

 

pancia di agnello00003.jpeg

 

By the time I sat at the table I've been left with 1 rib to try.

Edited by Franci (log)
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I think Okanagancook did a much better job at cleaning the ribs. We like fat.

 

This time I marinated the ribs overnight with garlic, rosemary, oil and salt. 

 .....

 

I lift them on a grill and poured some boiling water at the bottom. Covered with foil and steamed in the oven at 325 F (160C) for 1 hour and half.

 

I decided to stay in the Mediterranean zone. So I made a paste with garlic, rosemary, a couple anchovies and extra virgin olive oil and basted my ribs under my broiler (it's the thing I love most of my stove!)

 

By the time I sat at the table I've been left with 1 rib to try.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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