• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

martinlersch

Playing with texture

37 posts in this topic

Martin, I think crowdsourcing the photos for this collection is a great idea! There are some very accomplished amateur food photographers out there who will be able to make an enormous contribution to this. I'll have to have a look and see if there are any recipes I could do justice to, in terms of both the recipe itself and the photography. Good luck with this!


Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that's a pretty cool idea Martin. I don't think I could be much help though. I can handle doing the recipes but my photography skills are almost non-existent.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Version 2.3 of the recipe collection is now available for download. The major change since version 2.3 is the inclusion of pictures. The pictures often give you an idea of the texture, and they're also a good indication that the recipe has indeed been tested. There are now approximately 310 recipes in total now.

And one more thing: You can still help me add more pictures to the recipe collection! You can find more information on how to contribute pictures in my post from January 5th.


Martin Lersch, PhD
Chemist and food enthusiast

Visit Khymos, a blog dedicated to molecular gastronomy and popular food science.

Follow me on twitter @tastymolecules

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks yet again Martin. I saw it on your site yesterday (you're in my blogroll, I check in regularly) and grabbed it already. I'm happy to see a new round of TGRWT announced as well.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Awesome book Martin, keep up the great work. I've downloaded this book as well, a couple of times now. It's a great resource for anyone who's interested in molecular gastronomy. The best part is it's free!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

tv30.jpg

Thought I'd let you know that a major revision of Texture is now available for download: http://blog.khymos.org/2014/02/15/texture-updated-and-available-for-download/

"Texture - A hydrocolloid recipe collection" (v.3.0) features:

  • many new recipes, now counting 339 in total
  • more pictures (A big THANK YOU to all contributing photographers!)
  • a new chapter with non-hydrocolloid gels
  • a new table with viscosities of 1% solutions of hydrocolloids
  • many minor corrections throughout the recipes and appendix
  • conversion from US customary volumetric units in new added recipes done with Excel calculator available from http://blog.khymos.org/2014/01/23/volume-to-weight-calculator-for-the-kitchen/
3 people like this

Martin Lersch, PhD
Chemist and food enthusiast

Visit Khymos, a blog dedicated to molecular gastronomy and popular food science.

Follow me on twitter @tastymolecules

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I check in on your blog pretty regularly so I already grabbed it. Thanks again for putting them together.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the update. i first heard about the book at v.2.3 (here on eG, albeit in a different thread). It has been very useful. I'm sure the revised version will be even more so.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks - I'm glad you find it useful! When using Texture - consider taking a picture if you follow recipes without a picture. That way you can all help make Texture even better.


Martin Lersch, PhD
Chemist and food enthusiast

Visit Khymos, a blog dedicated to molecular gastronomy and popular food science.

Follow me on twitter @tastymolecules

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Many thanks Martin for your hard work putting this together and improving it constantly.


Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
My eG Foodblog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By ltjazz
      Hey all,
       
      I've made thicker and creamier sorbets with 25% to 35% sugar strained fruit purees and sugar, syrups, and other stabilizers that have worked well. However, because it's so much fruit and little to no water it can be an expensive project.
       
      I am trying to make "Water Ice" or "Italian Ice" in my home ice cream machine. Think of textures similar to Rita's Water Ice, Court Pastry Shop, or Miko's in Chicago. It eats much lighter than a sorbet but isn't really icy, but it's also not thick like sorbet. Ritas uses "flavoring" and sugar, while the other two use fruit juice. I'm thinking of thinning the strained fruit juice with water and adding a stabilizer, but I'm having trouble getting this in my home ice cream machine without it freezing solid like granita.
       
      Can anyone suggest a way to use real fruit juice, water, and a combination and concentration of stabilizers to get a looser, frozen fruit dessert that isn't icy?
    • By CanadianSportsman
      Greetings,

      I've cooked several recipes from Keller's "Bouchon" the last couple of weeks, and have loved them all! At the moment (as in right this minute) I'm making the boeuf Bourguignon, and am a little confused about the red wine reduction. After reducing the wine, herbs, and veg for nearly an hour now, I'm nowhere near the consistancy of a glaze that Keller specifies. In fact, it looks mostly like the veg is on the receiving end of most of it. Is this how the recipe is meant to be? Can anybody tell me what kind of yield is expected? Any help would be appreciated. Thank you, kindly. 
    • By paulraphael
      Does anyone have reliable tricks for getting good flavor out of garlic in a sous-vide bag? I'm talking about using it just as an aromatic, while cooking proteins, or as part of a stock or vegetable puree.
       
      The one time I forgot the maxim to leave raw garlic out of the bag, I ended up with celeriac puree that tasted like a tire fire.
       
      I see some recommendations to just use less, but in my experience the problem wasn't just too much garlic flavor. It was acrid, inedible flavor. Using less works fine for me with other mirepoix veggies.
       
      I also see recipes for s.v. garlic confit (listed by both Anova and Nomiku) and for some reason people say these taste good. How can this be?
       
      There was a thread questioning the old saw about blanching garlic multiple times in milk, which didn't come to any hard conclusions.
       
      I'm wondering if a quick blanch in water before adding to the s.v. bag, to deactivate the enzymes, would do the trick. But I don't know the actual chemistry behind the garlic tire fire, so am not confident this would work.
       
      Some cooks advocate garlic powder; I'm hoping to not resort to that.
       
      Thoughts?
    • By May10April
      I know there was a thread on this a few years ago, however it seems these scales are no longer made or newer better models are available.
      As I've become more serious about my baking, I've decided to get a kitchen scale. I'm debating between the My Weigh KD-8000 http://www.amazon.com/My-Weigh-Digital-Weighing-Scale/dp/B001NE0FU2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1297958394&sr=8-1 or the EatSmart Precision Pro Digital Scale. http://www.amazon.com/EatSmart-Precision-Digital-Kitchen-Scale/dp/B001N0D7GA/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=home-garden&qid=1297958443&sr=1-1 Originally I wanted the Taylor Salter High Capacity Scale because it looked cool, but I've noticed it received many mixed reviews. http://www.amazon.com/Taylor-Salter-Aquatronics-Capacity-Kitchen/dp/B004BIOMGU/ref=sr_1_24?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1297958465&sr=1-24
      Here are my requirments:
      -Minimum capacity of 11 lbs
      -Minimum resolution of 1 g
      -Measure in Kg, lb, oz, g
      -Tare feature
      -Preferably have seamless buttons
      I want to get a nice scale. I don't want to get a scale with minimum features only to find in two years that I do enough baking/cooking that requires me to have something more sophisticated.
      Here are a few other questions:
      1. How important is it to have a scale measure fluid ounces?
      2. What about measuring lbs. oz (for example 6 lbs and 4.2 ounces)
      3. Is it important to have a scale measure in bakers %? I'd like to learn how to do these and have a cookbook that shows them next to the measurements. I'm not sure if this is something most people can figure out on their own or it would be handy to have them on a scale. The MW KD-8000 does this.
      The only problem with the MW-KD-8000 is it appears to be big and bulky and I don't have a lot of counter space so I'd probably keep it stored most of the time. The Eat Smart just seems to minimal. The Salter seems like an expensive scale for what it offers and somewhat of a risk.
      Thanks for any help in helping me choose the right scale. I do not know why this is becoming a chore to purchase! I just want to make sure I choose the right one right off the bat.
    • By bhsimon
      Recently cooked whole bone-in lamb shoulder sous vide for 8 hours @ 80°C. The results were like a typical braise. More interestingly, I weighed the different components after cooking for future reference. Here is the breakdown:
       
      Before cooking:
      2.1 kg lamb shoulder – whole, bone-in, untrimmed
       
      After cooking:
      621 g liquid
      435 g bones and fat
      1044 g meat
       
      Almost precisely half of the total weight was meat. Hopefully this will be helpful if you are trying to calculate portions.
       
      As an aside to this: we've been cooking our tough cuts (sous vide) whole, without any trimming at all, and removing fat and bones after cooking. It is so much easier and faster than trimming everything beforehand. The excess fat comes off in large pieces and connective tissue peels away cleanly. Lamb shanks, for instance, are tedious to trim before cooking but easily cleaned up after they come out of the bag. It's luxurious to have big, clean pieces of shank meat although some may prefer on-the-bone presentation. We have tried this with pork shoulder, too, and the unwanted fat is easily removed after cooking with lovely hunks of tender meat remaining for slicing, dicing or shredding.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.