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Martin, I think crowdsourcing the photos for this collection is a great idea! There are some very accomplished amateur food photographers out there who will be able to make an enormous contribution to this. I'll have to have a look and see if there are any recipes I could do justice to, in terms of both the recipe itself and the photography. Good luck with this!

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I think that's a pretty cool idea Martin. I don't think I could be much help though. I can handle doing the recipes but my photography skills are almost non-existent.

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Version 2.3 of the recipe collection is now available for download. The major change since version 2.3 is the inclusion of pictures. The pictures often give you an idea of the texture, and they're also a good indication that the recipe has indeed been tested. There are now approximately 310 recipes in total now.

And one more thing: You can still help me add more pictures to the recipe collection! You can find more information on how to contribute pictures in my post from January 5th.

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Thanks yet again Martin. I saw it on your site yesterday (you're in my blogroll, I check in regularly) and grabbed it already. I'm happy to see a new round of TGRWT announced as well.

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Awesome book Martin, keep up the great work. I've downloaded this book as well, a couple of times now. It's a great resource for anyone who's interested in molecular gastronomy. The best part is it's free!

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tv30.jpg

Thought I'd let you know that a major revision of Texture is now available for download: http://blog.khymos.org/2014/02/15/texture-updated-and-available-for-download/

"Texture - A hydrocolloid recipe collection" (v.3.0) features:

  • many new recipes, now counting 339 in total
  • more pictures (A big THANK YOU to all contributing photographers!)
  • a new chapter with non-hydrocolloid gels
  • a new table with viscosities of 1% solutions of hydrocolloids
  • many minor corrections throughout the recipes and appendix
  • conversion from US customary volumetric units in new added recipes done with Excel calculator available from http://blog.khymos.org/2014/01/23/volume-to-weight-calculator-for-the-kitchen/
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That's fantastic, Martin. Thanks for all your work on this, and it's great to see you on eGullet again.

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I check in on your blog pretty regularly so I already grabbed it. Thanks again for putting them together.

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Thanks for the update. i first heard about the book at v.2.3 (here on eG, albeit in a different thread). It has been very useful. I'm sure the revised version will be even more so.

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Thanks - I'm glad you find it useful! When using Texture - consider taking a picture if you follow recipes without a picture. That way you can all help make Texture even better.

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Many thanks Martin for your hard work putting this together and improving it constantly.

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