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The Quintessential eG Food/Recipe


Kerry Beal
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I know I'm echoing others, but Roasted Cauliflower, Carnitas, and Jaymes' salsa.

Oh, and Smithy's creamed eggplant. Gads, I love that stuff.

Marcia.

Can someone point me to the Smithy's creamed eggplant recipe please?

I did try the search function a few ways, but didn't find it.

Thanks in advance

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Here you are, Smithy's creamed eggplant.

To search more effectively go to the google link in the top right corner. It searches within eG as long as you click eGullet rather than web. I put in 'Smithy's eggplant' and got it right away.

When I started this thread I didn't consider the side effects of all the new things I'm going to have to try.

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Roasted cauliflower has been the single most influential eGullet Society food/recipe discovery for me. It is getting to be that season! :cool:

I see I haven't rummaged around nearly enough in RecipeGullet yet.

I haven't gotten around to making the onion confit I asked about well over a year ago, but I just made the roasted cauliflower for the first time last week. Absolutely revelatory, and so simple! Does this trick work with broccoli too?

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

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I know I'm echoing others, but Roasted Cauliflower, Carnitas, and Jaymes' salsa.

Oh, and Smithy's creamed eggplant. Gads, I love that stuff.

Marcia.

:wub: Wow, I feel like a celebrity!

Roasted cauliflower and all its relations for me. Roasted asparagus is a regular household routine now. Drizzled with olive oil, with touches of salt, garlic, balsamic vinegar and lemon juice - oh, my.

Fifi's gumbo.

Braising, from the eGCI course. It's a technique rather than a recipe, but it opened worlds for me,

including...

Tagines.

Foodman's samke harra, and pita.

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Does this trick work with broccoli too?

Yes, and some nice add-ons as a finish are a touch of balsamic vinegar, or a hint of lemon zest with black pepper, or toasted buttered breadcrumbs. :wink:

I didn't have as much success with roasted broccoli. Where cauliflower transforms into a loftier state of golden goodness, broccoli seems to keep its broccoli essence.

I completely agree with all that has been said about the infamous Roasted Cauliflower recipe and discussion. It totally changed at how I look at veggies and has added a whole new depth to cooking for me.

Roast carrots and cumin are pretty good, too (with the usual olive oil and salt & pepper). Roasted beets still taste like roasted dirt to me :laugh: but I'm still enjoying most of the roast veggie experiments.

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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Add another vote for roasted cauliflower, and Jayme's shortcut cooked red salsa. Also - the Russ Parsons no-soak method for cooking beans. And sourdough from the eGCI course. All things I make on a very regular basis.

"Nothing you could cook will ever be as good as the $2.99 all-you-can-eat pizza buffet." - my EX (wonder why he's an ex?)

My eGfoodblog: My corner of the Midwest

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I didn't have as much success with roasted broccoli. Where cauliflower transforms into a loftier state of golden goodness, broccoli seems to keep its broccoli essence.

I completely agree with all that has been said about the infamous Roasted Cauliflower recipe and discussion. It totally changed at how I look at veggies and has added a whole new depth to cooking for me.

Wow. That's the first time I looked at that topic. Fifteen pages? :shock:

:laugh:

Phew.

I do broccoli at 425 to 450 degrees F as opposed to the 400 the cauliflower recipe asks for, and for a shorter period of time. Five to ten minutes depending on the size cut. Some of the tinier edges are on the verge of blackening. At that point, the broccoli-ness diminishes. But it's touchy. It can get overdone quickly from there on in.

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I know I'm echoing others, but Roasted Cauliflower, Carnitas, and Jaymes' salsa.

Oh, and Smithy's creamed eggplant. Gads, I love that stuff.

Marcia.

:wub: Wow, I feel like a celebrity!

Thanks to Kerry Beal for posting the link - as I just mentioned in another thread we're in the midst of moving, and so my internet time is limited! And thank you, Smithy, for posting the recipe in the first place...I don't know how many eggplants have given their lives for that recipe :biggrin: .

Roasting broccoli: I usually parcook it first, then roast at 450F to get that crunchy outside. I agree that it doesn't transform quite like cauliflower, but it is quite tasty with a number of contrasting textures.

Marcia.

Don't forget what happened to the man who suddenly got everything he wanted...he lived happily ever after. -- Willy Wonka

eGullet foodblog

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The list is so long two of my favorites

Fii's Gumbo

Jaymes Carnitas

Swisschef game me a great chicken in white with wine and morels recipe

I have tried many recipes and loved them all.

**************************************************

Ah, it's been way too long since I did a butt. - Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

--------------------

One summers evening drunk to hell, I sat there nearly lifeless…Warren

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roasted cauliflower for me.

and the cookoffs really have helped me expand my culinary horizons..

i have learned how to shallow fry chicken, make mapo tofu, gumbo, several variations of pad thai all of which have helped me get more vegetables into johnnybird

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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Onion Confit and the Minimalist, No-Knead Breach technique

I've been roasting broccoli for a while, but now I'm stoked to try the cauliflower (in 8 weeks or so, when I have a kitchen again). Damn. I need to stop reading eGullet when I'm kitchenless--it's just depressing. :raz:

Feast then thy heart, for what the heart has had, the hand of no heir shall ever hold.
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:biggrin:

It's the cauliflower, no two ways about it. How anything that simple can be that good still amazes me -- and I had it at the first Heartland ingathering/feast/barely contained small riot in Michigan, coming up on four years ago in October. Maggiethecat made a big pan of it, and the predictable happened: a bunch of curious foodies gathered around and started snitching samples. Samples turned into snacks, as we all prepared our various goodies. The cauliflower simply walked away, a few florets at a time.

I'm not remembering that much, if any, of that pan of simple roasted goodness made it to the table at all...

:biggrin:

Me, I vote for the joyride every time.

-- 2/19/2004

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I haven't actually read the roasted cauliflower topic, but I do love roasted cauliflower. Haven't tried broccoli yet, but my favorite roasted vegetable is brussel sprouts. I didn't like brussel sprouts much til I tried them roasted. I generally halve or quarter them, toss with olive oil, salt and pepper and roast at 450. The crispy dark bits are the best!

So far I definitely have not made enough recipes from recipe gullet, but I did make Ann_T's greek ribs and they will be getting repeat play in my kitchen.

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I will join the chorus and say the Roasted Cauliflower ... Jim Dixon introduced me to it here on eG, and I'm forever grateful! ... I even made some last week, and my family loves it, too ... also Larb, that tommy introduced me to, and of course Jaymes' salsa... I've made all of these several times...

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Russell Wong's remarkable and simple naw mai fon is a staple in our house. We have it with homemade lop yuk every other week, at least.

Our go-to fresh pasta is made using Moby Pomerance's pasta recipe from his eGCI course. Flexible, easy, and very eggy.

=Mark's aforementioned South Carolina sauce is the bomb. There's always a pint bottle of it on the fridge door in case we have to defrost some pulled pork. (Oh, and Dave the Cook's help on my butt was a revelation.)

Can't fry without the latke techniques from the potato pancake eG Cook-Off, and can't make cassoulet without the tips from the cassoulet cook-off.

Chris Amirault

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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This is just a great topic -- lauding the famous eG standards , like roast cauliflower (You're right, Lady T. In Grand Rapids the choufleur was history before the third bottle of Maker's Mark was broached) and learning about primo stuff I've overlooked. Like Smithy's eggplant.

And how could I have failed to mention here the Potage Nero? NeroW's One of Each Soup? Suave, mysterious whether hot or cold. And oh, so easy.

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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