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The Blissful Glutton

Making Mexican at home

441 posts in this topic

I'll add the Enchiladas Placeras I made recently from Marilyn Tausend's new cookbook La Cocina Mexicana

Enciladas Placeras.JPG

Easier than I thought they'd be and very tasty. Sauce is Ancho/guajillo based and the tortillas are dipped in sauce and then fried; recipe called for cotija or jack, I had quesillo on hand and used that instead. Messy but good. The potato and carrots were cooked in water to which a little pineapple vinegar had been added until barely done and then fried. They were outstanding.

Typically the chicken on the plate would have been either a leg quarter or breast that had been parcooked and then fried. I had a mutant chicken breast that weighed in at 16 oz so I poached that, sliced it and then fried the slices. That part was okay, but it would have been way better with just the whole chicken quarter fried.

The dish was much lighter and less dense than I thought it would be. Left overs for dinner tonight...YUM

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kalypso that looks to die for.

Agreed! What do you think of the cookbook?

I like the cookbook alot, in part because it's got recipes for things that are either overlooked or not featured at all.

And in the interest of full disclosure, I was a recipe tester for the cookbook. Enchiladas Placeras was not one of the recipes I tested, so it was a new recipe to me.

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I've been on an enchilada tear the past couple of week. I also made these...Enchiladas Verdes de Aguacaliente from Diana Kennedy's Tortilla Book

Kalypso – I looked up the recipe and that sounds wonderful. Thanks for sharing!

Requeson revuelto a la Mexicana (ricotta scrambled like Mexican eggs) – An old favorite from Diana Kennedy’s The Art of Mexican Cooking. I usually double the Serrano chiles, and this time I also added a chipotle in adobo.

On corn tortillas with queso fresco

p1223314302-4.jpg

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Mrs. C’s ham stock featured prominently in tonight’s meal.

Corn soup with chicken and chile Poblano (Crema de elote con pollo y Poblano): Corn, milk, corn starch, and fried onion and garlic, pureed and strained, and then simmered with ham stock, cubed chicken breast, and roasted chile Poblano. Cilantro garnish. I adore corn and chile Poblano, and the ham stock came through nicely.

p1254283476-4.jpg

Mexican red rice (arroz rojo): Shortcut version with enchilada salsa, ham stock, corn, and peas.

p1254283464-4.jpg

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rice w enchilada sauce is a new one to me and a great idea!

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Oxtail Mole de Olla with Taquitos:

946837fc-c1e7-4168-b98d-3c65c1c014ad.jpg

Intended for last night, but the oxtails needed more braising than we had time for.

Fast forward to tonight, with an extra few hours of cooking and all was well. The taquitos (cheese, onion cilantro) made for a nice, crunchy edible utensil.


Mike Oliphant

Food Blog: Menu In Progress | Twitter: @menuinprogress

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MIP - Wow, that looks fantastic! What recipe did you use?

Thanks! I don't really follow a particular recipe. The base is blended pasilla and dried costeña chiles. I added diced onion at the beginning and Mexican zucchini and potato toward the end. Seasoning was simply salt and Mexican oregano.


Mike Oliphant

Food Blog: Menu In Progress | Twitter: @menuinprogress

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For some things, I never know when to start a new thread or revive an ancient one that has lots of good input. In this case, my subject is mole, and I found several old posts about mole, and then this post which features plenty of mole as well but seems to enjoy better success and discussion when revived, so here I am :)  .

 

East TN is being told we can expect another last 'bout of winter weather this weekend, so I want to cook something delicious and complicated and cozy. I have had mole and homemade tortillas on my list for ages, so this seems like a good time. I've enjoyed a lot of good mole varieties over the years but never made one (of any type) myself. I've settled on the mole rojo a la Rick Bayless (I've seen it pop up in various places around here), with a little inspiration from a Oaxacan culture blog as well. 

https://www.thepauperedchef.com/article/my-first-mole-rich-red-mole-with-chicken

http://oaxacaculture.com/2012/03/recipe-making-authentic-mole-rojo-in-teotitlan-del-valle/

 

As the second link references Mexican chocolate with almonds, I'm quite excited because I have a disc of Taza mexican almond chocolate I've been hoarding for no real reason until now. I'm really looking forward to this and will post pics / let you know how it turns out! any tips based on the two recipes I linked? I am going to continue reading over all the great old mole posts i'm finding on eGullet.

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Good to read your post, pistolabella.  It's been so long since the Mexican section has been active.  Good luck with the mole. 


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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Following anxiously as well. I made mole -- once. It was good, not just excellent, but good, but I failed to wear gloves to handle the chiles and my hands burned for HOURS....

 

Where in E. TN are you? I have friends in the Johnson City area who are battening down the hatches for the weekend.

 


Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Wellll I hate to be such a tease with the mole making, but last night my husband came down with a horrible stomach flu so there will be no such Mexican cooking project this week. We'll be postponing til next weekend so that he can enjoy as well, and I'll update then. This weekend's project is now to make some good soups for him to have while on the mend. KayB - we're in the Knoxville area. Never know what to *really* expect with the snow forecasts here, but I have a feeling we'll actually see something this time.

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