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soffritto/sofrito/mirepoix...


Naftal
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Most (all?) cultures have a basic spice/herb/vegetable mix (or mixes). I am familiar with the soffritos,sofritos,and mirepoixs of Europe. I know of the za'taars of the Middle-East. But that is it. And, I would love to learn more.

Please share your basic spice/herb/vegetable mix,or mixes.

Thanks.. :cool:

"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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Well, the one noteworthy one that springs to mind is the Creole Trinity- similar to a mirepoix, but composed of onion, celery and bell pepper.

I'll think on it and see if I can conjure any more- menu-planning done- gotta hit the co-op for ingredients now. Their Producer's Fair is today. :smile:

Sincerely,

Dante

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Well, the one noteworthy one that springs to mind is the Creole Trinity- similar to a mirepoix, but composed of onion, celery and bell pepper.

I'll think on it and see if I can conjure any more- menu-planning done- gotta hit the co-op for ingredients now. Their Producer's Fair is today.  :smile:

                                                        Sincerely,

                                                                Dante

Thanks! I know the term, but I always forget the actual ingredients of a creol trinity. :cool:

"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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How about the North African spice blend Ras al Hanout?

Also, the combination of ginger(or gangala), garlic, lemongrass, and chilis are the norm in Thai cuisine, or curry paste for that matter.

Thanks so much :cool: Do you know what goes into Ras al Hanout?

Anybody?

"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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Ras al Hanout ( it means head of the house in Arabic) is similar to curry. There is no absoulute recipe for this spice blend. It is basically a mixture of the best spices each spice store has to sell. I start with a base of tumeric and paprika( both sweet and smoked). I add spices like cinnamon, clove, star anise, corriander, fennel seed, cardomon, allspice, black pepper, piment d espelette, and ground ginger.

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Thanks! I know the term, but I always forget the actual ingredients of a creol trinity. :cool:

it's really just a morepoix with bell peppers in place of carrots.

and, yet, oddly, some "Creole" places outside of N'awlins still don't seem to get it correctly... :wink:

Sincerely,

Dante

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Thanks so much :cool: Do you know what goes into Ras al Hanout?

Anybody?

no definitve blend exists. I cobbled mine together from a variety of sources, but I use a mix of black, white, red and green peppercorns, cinnamon, clove, dried rose petals, allspice, nutmeg and my personal curry blend (powdered ginger, cumin, coriander, fennel seed, fenugreek, cardamom and turmeric)

there's also baharat- another blend from northern Africa with varying ingredients- I use allspice, cinnamon, clove, cumin, cayenne, black pepper, coriander, cardamom, paprika, allspice and nutmeg. Essentially a peppery curry blend.

Sincerely,

Dante

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Chinese: Ginger, Garlic, Spring Onions

Though I don't think there's a name for it. My mother always described the purpose of these ingredients as to chù xun (pinyin uncertain), or to remove the unpleasant fishy or meaty flavors.

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