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Laguna Beach


Carolyn Tillie
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So begins my week in Laguna Beach.

I actually arrived on Sunday and started with intensely mediocre salad at Piknic in Playa Vista. I ordered the chopped salad with turkey, garbanzo beans, bacon, and provolone and my friend, W, had a Niman Ranch steak salad. The dressings were bottled and the steak was disgustingly thin and chewy. That's okay - it is about the company and not the food...

The evening, however, was about the company AND the food. Another fabulous visit to

Bin 8945. As I am still digesting the notes (and the meal!) I will be posting a full accounting in its separate thread in a day or so. Suffice to say this is currently my favorite restaurant in Los Angeles and the *best* wine pairings I've had in the entire state. David's sensibilities and ability to pair is incomparable.

This thread will remain for all the places I will eat at around the art festivals. For starters, I have reservations tonight for the Five Crowns which is a Lawry's link in their chain and Stonehill Tavern

for tomorrow night. The rest of the week is still as-yet undecided...

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If you're feeling adventurous you could head to Costa Mesa and try Mesa, the new restaurant at The Camp at Bristol & Baker. I haven't gone, but it's on my agenda here soon. Five Crowns is super old school. I can't wait to hear your report because my wife and I have been toying with the idea of checking it out. It's sort of an institution.

R. Jason Coulston

jason@popcling.com

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Just returned from Five Crowns... There were four of us and we started with the following:

Starters

1. Many-Onion Soup - okay, this is no longer a French Onion Soup apparently, where we expected a toasted crouton topped with melted cheese. This was an incredibly lame, flavorless concoction of wilted, flavorless onions with a limp broth and chunks of sweet, dark bread. Now I like sweet dark bread - but usually with butter and from my hand; not as a soggy addition to wimpy soup.

2. Crab Cakes - reasonably decent. Crusted with panko crumbs and redolent with chunky crab, served with a tangy sauce that was well-enjoyed.

3. Lobster Bisque - this was almost too rich and creamy. Topped with a creme fraiche foam and finely diced sundried tomatoes, only a few tastes sufficed.

4. Napolean of freshly-roasted beets and goat cheese - this was a replacement dish. I wanted and ordered the foie gras (apparently new to the menu) was already sold out. The beets were well-roasted with a red slice on the bottom, some creamy goat cheese, a golden orange slice in the middle with a bit more goat cheese, and topped with a bright yellow slice of beet atop. Served with a side of dressed mesclun, this was nothing better than what I could prepare at home, but still nicely done.

Two Sides

1. Sesame- and ginger-sauteed asparagus. Didn't fit with the rest of the genre of the evening, but well-prepared and will make a great salad for lunch tomorrow.

2. It was described as Oyster Mushrooms but I have never seen slices of oyster mushroom this big and chewy before. Almost flavorless. No - they were flavorless. On the platter, they looked like steak fries. Seriously.

Entrees

1. Classic cut of prime rib served with creamed spinach, broccolini, and a pop-over. This was a huge, classic piece and I admitted to being surprised at the fact that no steak knives were placed on any of our settings. They weren't needed. This is a Lawry's restaurant and they prepared a perfect hunk of prime rib. The spinach was lackluster and un-interesting but the additions of au jus and fluffy, creamed horseradish was perfect.

2. Grilled Rib Eye with mashed potatoes and served with topped, tiny onion rings. This was amazing cut of meat. Again, I was surprised there were no steak knives offered but none were needed. This was an intensely well-marbled hunk of meat that was tender enough to be cut with a butter knife. It definitely stood out throughout the entire meal.

3. Roast Duck with sliced apples, prunes, and a sweet port reduction. This was served with a wild rice studded with walnuts, broccolini, and some well-turned carrots. Although a tad on the sweet side, this was one of the better pieces of prepared duck I have ever tasted. Instead of the classic, half-cut whole piece, these were quartered so no bones had to be fought with and all the pieces were tender and rich. Really great duck.

4. Butterfly shrimp and scallops in a creamy, coconut spicy sauce with a touch of curry. Centered with mound Forbidden Black Rice (rather over-cooked, I thought, on the mushy side), this was a rich, slightly spicy dish that somewhat overpowered the shellfish. Don't get me wrong; it was great sauce! But any hunk of fish could have been served in this sauce and had it taste pretty good - from halibut to calamari steak...

Desserts

1. Souffle - we pre-ordered a souffle and for the life of me, I can't remember what the flavor was. It was just okay; already slightly deflated and filled with whipped cream and creme anglaise when it was served. There were a few brown, crunchy edges that interested me more and I ate those quickly.

2. Fresh Peach Cobbler - served very hot and a bit on the chewy side, this was served with ice cream and was neither great nor bad. It just was. I only had one bite.

3. English Triffle - LAME! Mediocre cake layered with English cream and fresh fruit, as far as triffles go this one was decidedly mediocre. I tasted none of the much-desired brandy that should soak the cake. I only had one bite.

4. Stilton plate with a port wine pairing. A few mis-steps in this dish. For starters, it was advertised as being served with raisin bread (it was not). I also ordered it served with a 20-year Taylor's port which they were out of (gee, just like the foie!). Instead, I asked the sommelier to serve me something appropriate and he gave me a rather decent Eos late-harvest Zinfandel. Alongside the three ample chunks of stilton were walnuts, water crackers, sliced dried figs, and a rather interesting and spicy apricot compote. I always prefer a good cheese plate with sweet wine to the classic dessert and even with the mis-steps, this was the preferred dessert.

Some Other Notes

The reason for this visit is entirely sentimental - I was born and raised in Orange County and this was the restaurant that my parents would go to and take visiting family members to on special occasions 30+ years ago. My sisters and I went here this evening in honor of my parents and it was the very first time that my two sisters, my niece, and I have ever spent alone time together other than our parents' funerals. I have memories of my mother's 40th birthday party here when I was just six years old and again when I was 9 and my grandmother visited form Pennsylvania. This restaurant has staying power and heritage.

In those 30-ish some years, the Five Crowns has not changed in its decor or demeanor. It is dark and old-worldy in its service and presentation. What has changed is that all the dishes are no longer served entirely on pewter and many classic dishes are gone (no more escargot, Welsh rarebit, or classic French Onion Soup).

The classic dishes are just that: Classic. It is a great hunk of prime rib and the rib eye was a stunning piece of meat. There is also the price. Besides my glass of port, I ordered a 2001 Lamborn Howell Mountain Zinfandel. The bottle of wine, four starters, two sides, four entrees, and four desserts with a single glass of port came out to just over $300. That, in itself, made this quite a bargain. For the rib-eye and prime rib alone, I would return. The service was professional and helpful and for a Monday night in the summer, the restaurant was about 75% full with quick service. I would not want to be there on a weekend. Also, a good portion of the guests were -- okay, let's say from an era that would appreciate this style of food... Yes: Elderly.

It was reminiscent of days-gone-by and quite enjoyable for what it was. I don't need to go again for another twenty years but sincerely doubt it will be any different twenty years from now. They will still serve a really good hunk of meat at a reasonable value...

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Your review is pretty much exactly what I expected. If I'm ever feeling like roast prime rib of beef with a popover, I know exactly where to go. Great read actually, and thanks for posting. Too bad about the soup. What was with the pewter service pieces though? Did they used to serve on pewter chargers?

R. Jason Coulston

jason@popcling.com

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2. It was described as Oyster Mushrooms but I have never seen slices of oyster mushroom this big and chewy before. Almost flavorless. No - they were flavorless. On the platter, they looked like steak fries. Seriously.

I suspect they were king oyster mushrooms a.k.a. eryngii mushrooms. They are big and meaty with a tendency to toughness unless braised into submission; the big fat stems, when sliced into slabs, can indeed look a lot like steak fries. Pity they didn't cook them long enough, because they can be quite nice if handled right. But it sounds like this restaurant is not about the newfangled ingredients but the old standbys anyway. :smile:

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2. It was described as Oyster Mushrooms but I have never seen slices of oyster mushroom this big and chewy before. Almost flavorless. No - they were flavorless. On the platter, they looked like steak fries. Seriously.

I suspect they were king oyster mushrooms a.k.a. eryngii mushrooms. They are big and meaty with a tendency to toughness unless braised into submission; the big fat stems, when sliced into slabs, can indeed look a lot like steak fries. Pity they didn't cook them long enough, because they can be quite nice if handled right. But it sounds like this restaurant is not about the newfangled ingredients but the old standbys anyway. :smile:

Thank you - yes. I didn't take notes and remembered the "oyster" part of the description but not the "king" (and I'm a mushroom fan!).

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Do the waitresses still wear those low-cut medieval wench dresses?

Our wine steward (male) was wearing a professional suit and tie. Our server (female) was wearing a dark, Nehru jacket-like outfit; dark and professional. No wench dresses.

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What was with the pewter service pieces though?  Did they used to serve on pewter chargers?

Yes -- there is actually this family joke that my grandmother loved tiny service ware and would "lift" pieces that she liked. My sisters and I remember her wiping out the pewter butter dish and slipping it in her purse. While we have no idea what ultimately happened to that particular dish, I have in my collection a very small, pewter cream pitcher which is etched "Palace Hotel." It is no more than 2 1/2 to 3 inches tall and to this day, I am still curious where the Palace Hotel was that she swiped it from.

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If you're feeling adventurous you could head to Costa Mesa and try Mesa, the new restaurant at The Camp at Bristol & Baker.  I haven't gone, but it's on my agenda here soon. 

I'm having some difficulty finding any info on this place. This 2002 review is the most current info I can seem to detect. No website for the place?

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That review is actually for the since-closed and former Goodell restaurant, The Lodge. I was referring to Mesa which is new. Brand new as of just a few weeks ago. I'm also unable to find a website for the restaurant but there was a recent review I'll try to track down and post. The outdoor patio looks gorgeous and I think is probably worth the trip to check out. I took a quick look at the menu one evening and it looks like American contemporary with slight nods to the Mediterranean. It also looks like a lot of tendy, well-dressed OC celebutard types so that general annoyance might be enough to turn me off overall. We'll see.

Edit:

Here's the review: Mesa at The Camp, Costa Mesa

Edited by SiseFromm (log)

R. Jason Coulston

jason@popcling.com

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Lunch today was at Mother India on Baker Street in Costa Mesa. This was at the request of close friends of mine and not my choosing. The last time I took these friends to lunch, they asked to be taken to Natraj at 998-B South Coast Highway in Laguna Beach and I only wish we had gone back to Natraj as Mother India was an abomination.

For starters, there was no paneer in the saag and the saag was thick and pasty. The masala was lifeless. There was something with zucchini which was so overcooked as to be incredibly limp. Their mango lassi was thin. The saving grace was the gulab jamin which was at least prepared when it was ordered = it was hot.

I didn't eat much in preparation for dinner...

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Interestingly enough we were out for Indian last night as well. We were at India Cookhouse in Irvine at the 5 Freeway and Culver Avenue. It was TASTY. The Mushroom Masala was pure gold. It was a bit rich, but lovely all the same. The Lamb Tikka was cooked a bit too far I thought but the Chicken Tandoori was tender and spicy from the yogurt marinade. I'd definitely go back.

R. Jason Coulston

jason@popcling.com

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A busy week and weekend left me unable to post recommendations, darn it....

Interesting report on Five Crowns, definitely a local institution. I live right up the street and the place still consistently packs them in. Gallos deli right across the street is a great sandwich shop.

Great reports Carolyn.

If its not too late....

Sapphire in Laguna has gotten some excellent reviews, as has Marche Modern in South Coast Plaza.

"A man's got to believe in something...I believe I'll have another drink." -W.C. Fields

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A busy week and weekend left me unable to post recommendations, darn it....

Interesting report on Five Crowns, definitely a local institution.  I live right up the street and the place still consistently packs them in.  Gallos deli right across the street is a great sandwich shop.

Great reports Carolyn.

If its not too late....

Sapphire in Laguna has gotten some excellent reviews, as has Marche Modern in South Coast Plaza.

I'm going to Sapphire tonight, actually! I've heard about Marche Modern but I am getting to the point in this trip where I would like to stay local and not have to drive. As I am alone, it is hard to drink all this wine and then make sure I get back to the hotel safely... At least with Sapphire there is that nifty free Laguna shuttle that will see me home if I decide to get snockered!

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A busy week and weekend left me unable to post recommendations, darn it....

Interesting report on Five Crowns, definitely a local institution.  I live right up the street and the place still consistently packs them in.  Gallos deli right across the street is a great sandwich shop.

Great reports Carolyn.

If its not too late....

Sapphire in Laguna has gotten some excellent reviews, as has Marche Modern in South Coast Plaza.

I'm going to Sapphire tonight, actually! I've heard about Marche Modern but I am getting to the point in this trip where I would like to stay local and not have to drive. As I am alone, it is hard to drink all this wine and then make sure I get back to the hotel safely... At least with Sapphire there is that nifty free Laguna shuttle that will see me home if I decide to get snockered!

Thats excellent, I didn't realize you were staying down in Laguna. I am very interested to hear your take on Sapphire, I don't believe anyone has reviewed thouroughly here. The LA times reviewed it quite favorably if I recall correctly, let me see if I can dig up the review for you.

A few more....

The roof bar at the Casa del Camino Hotel is an excellent place for a sunset drink. I also love the saloon for cocktails, its a tiny bar with a lot of character. Penguin Cafe and The Cottage are great breakfast spots.

"A man's got to believe in something...I believe I'll have another drink." -W.C. Fields

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I had a number of people recommend Sapphire to me and it was easy to see why - the place was hopping and while I was initially disgruntled to only be able to get a 5:30 reservation (geez, the shops are still open then!), by 6:00 it was packed and I felt lucky to have a table. The "scene" is that of the elite of Orange County - lots of perfectly tanned bodies, expensive clothes, and big diamonds. Yes, I felt out of place, but that's okay.

Wanting to get through as much as possible, I was fortunate that another solo diner was seated next to me and we quickly became fast friends, thereby enabling me to taste considerably more than I would on my own. Hence I don't have pics of everything...

I started with a trio of fish - a lollypop of ahi, escabeche of salmon, and sashimi kampachi. My first (and only?) big, unknowing mistake of the evening was that my first bite was the kampachi which was dressed with a hidden slice of jalapeno pepper. The jolt of spice slightly killed my ability to adequately taste the other fish. I vaguely remember the ahi having a bit of a bit and the scallop being slightly tougher than it should, but I had to eat too much bread to get through the burn in my mouth.

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Next I ordered a wild mushroom "cappucino" with porcini foam. Much of this dish is its supposed style; a large platter was placed in front of me and the "cappucino" was deftly poured into the dish from a paper Starbucks (or equivalent) cup. Kinda silly actually and if there was porcini foam, it was lost in the pour. Okay, this might have been my other mistake of the evening -- it was a great mushroom soup, but would have been much better appreciated on a chilly November afternoon; not on a hot August night when a tomato gazpacho or chilled cucumber soup would have been preferred. Wrong time of the year to serve such things...

I then ordered a Tunisian crab warka served with an herb-chickpea salad and tomato-harissa aioli. This was just downright brilliant and clearly a show-stopper. The crab was succulent and moist, the chickpea salad was studded with lentils and fava beans, and dressed greens accentuated the rich, spicy aioli. Stunning.

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At this point, my neighbor shared with me his braised prime short ribs with creamy Parisian mashed potatoes and mirepoix garnish. This was just comfort food - nothing ground-breaking, but well-prepared with the expected tender stringiness and rich sauce. While we were chatting, we kept smelling the aroma of truffles in the air and when asked about it, were told it was a side on the lamb sirloin; "truffles pomme frites." The waiter informed us we could have them as a side and how could we say no? Perfectly crispy and hot, the flavor of truffle did not overwhelm, as it often can.

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I, on the other hand, opted for a more daring crispy duck leg confit with white polenta and cherry-chocolate mole. The duck itself was far from perfect - slightly on the tough side, the overwhelming heat from the plate led me to believe that it sat under a heat lamp a bit too long. However the polenta was intensely rich and the juxtaposition of the cherry-chocolate mole with the bright, crisp green beans and bits of corn played well of each other. This was all about the components and it was slightly sad that the meat was not up to par with the rest, but was easy to look aside because of the playfulness of the dish.

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For dessert, I should have listened to my waiter who suggested an Australian passion fruit Pavlova with fresh beeries, and a mango coulis. Instead, I was intrigued with a Buddha's hand confit which was described as part of a Hazelnut feuillitine. The feuillitine, like the mushroom soup, would be better suited for winter and fall - it was heavy and thick. Sadly, any hint of Buddha's hand was missing. It was well-plated and all that, but didn't do it for me.

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An enjoyable evening, most definitely. I regret that I didn't dine there with a large party - if only to taste through the entire menu as much looks very intriguing and innovative. The warka was a clear favorite. The waitstaff is attentive. Occasionally I felt rather abandoned but when a waiter was missing-in-action, a manager or busboy seemingly steps in. Very affordable - with my three starters, two glasses of wine, an entree, and a dessert, I spent around $150.00.

Edited by Carolyn Tillie (log)
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Great OC reviews this week Carolyn. Even though your words are quite critical, to the point of discouraging, your photos have the opposite effect. Yum!

As for feeling out of place with the OC crowd - not long after we moved there we walked into a restaurant on Balboa one Thursday night, not realizing it was singles night for the ritzy Newport Beach professional crowd, and just burst into laughter. It was so like the wookie bar from Star Trek. I have never felt out of place in a restaurant again.

We take visitors from out of town to see this action, much as we take them to Upper Newport Bay to see the local shorebirds, and joke about writing a field guide.

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Great OC reviews this week Carolyn. Even though your words are quite critical, to the point of discouraging,  your photos have the opposite effect. Yum!

Yeah, its true... I was a professional critic and there is still a vein within me that looks at food critically instead of just enjoying it for what it is.

Since I'm traveling alone, it has been a great way for me to share my vacation! If there were an art-chat board, I could go through the galleries and festivals and discuss the works I'm considering acquiring. (I've narrowed it down to two paintings and just can't decide!)

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I wonder how Sapphire missed our radar. I'll have to swing in to see what's going on. After our somewhat mixed experience with Hush, another high-end Laguna eatery, we've kind of avoided that beautiful people scene. My denim just doesn't cost enough to hang. Have you tried Brussels Bistro on Forest near PCH?

R. Jason Coulston

jason@popcling.com

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I have not been to Brussels Bistro, but will check it out when I get home. We are living in Europe this year; this Bistro may be the place to get our croquette fix when we come back.

We were getting in a rut before we left Irvine, always going to the same places on those nights we didn’t feel like cooking, but also didn’t feel like “going out”. One default due to my passion for their hamburgers (the only thing I ever order) and the 2-minute proximity was the Steelhead on Campus Dr. Also a Japanese place in a strip mall in Costa Mesa - I think off Redhill or Baker. I have no idea of the name although I have been there dozens of times. Or Royal Khyber, which was starting to feel like my living room.

Where do the rest of you go when you are hungry but not really up to going out? Where are your hang-outs?

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Sorry I haven't been keeping up with this...

I had two friends come in on Thursday afternoon - they were immediately starving and spied the Johnny Rockets on the corner. Whatever. A mediocre burger, fries, and root beer float sufficed but hardly set the tone for what I had been eating all week. That evening, however, we stopped at what I think was the Surf and Sea hotel for cocktails. Beautiful scenery - mediocre Sidecar (fake lime juice, I believe). We started walking north with the intention of going to French 75. We had no reservations but it was relatively early and a local gallery order recommended it. The waitress seemed put out when we informed her we had no reservations. I noticed a sign out front that indicated Champagne cocktails and half-price hors d'oeuvres from 5:00 to 7:00 and we were certainly within that window, however when we were seated, the only menu we received was some "twilight" prix-fixe menu that looked un-exciting. My friends and I were turned off by the bad mojo and left immediately. As we continued walking north, I mentioned Sapphire - that I had eaten there the previously evening and it couldn't hurt to ask how long the wait was.

Much to my surprise, they recognized me immediately and offered to sit us as a great table by the wine racks. A new waiter I had never seen introduced himself but chimed in, "welcome back, Ms. Tillie." Nicely done. We repeated a few of my dishes, the crab warka and the truffle fries, but added two more starters, a roasted tomato and goat cheese tart with crispy pancetta, caramelized onion, and argula pesto. Obviously fresh ingredients and a great flavor - although I don't much remember an overt flavor of pancetta. We also shared a chicken Sikh-Kabob served with a lettuce wrap, green papapa salad, and mint raita. A new twist on the lettuce wrapas the kabobs were served on their own miniature grill and a self-assemble components.

The duck had already been removed from the menu. We opted for three shared entrees:

1. Pan-seared barramundi, olive oil-poached tomato, warm baby vegetables, and herbes de Provence butter - this was an amazing piece of fish and the vegetables very fresh. A great summer dish.

2. Monk fish clay pot, baked polenta, with a country eggplant-tomato stew - almost too subtle in taste but beautifully served in Korean ddukbaege instead of a clay pot.

3. Baked Kurobuta pork shank with kabocha gnocchi, brussels sprouts, and homemade apple mustard. This was the clear winner of the evening as the meat was tender, the gnocchi light, and the the sauce rich.

We finished the evening with previously-missed Pavlova and I can understand why it is so desired. Very light and refreshing, a great finish to a great second evening. You guys are lucky to have this in your neighborhood!

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For a change, I ate a breakfast on Friday - but this time with the delightful Maison Rustique! She recommended a spot in the Laguna Hills, Break of Dawn Restaurant. What a superb restaurant, but what fabulous company! I grabbed a flier but regrettably, the dish I ordered is not listed so I'm hoping Maison will chime in on what I am missing... I had a stunning roast duck creation that had two sauces. It was layered with (I think?) egg and house-made toast. The whole dish was heightened with macerated moji berries and that was the unexpected surprise. It was intensely rich and satisfying. Maison's dish IS listed in their tri-fold and it was Smoked Salmon with Egg - but served with an oatmeal galette, marinated tomatoes, and a preserved lemon-caper emulsion. What a stunning combination of flavors! The oatmeal galette was an interesting carb-component that grounded the dish and made it much more interesting than a mere potato galette would.

After some errands and brakfast, I picked up a friend to head back into Laguna proper and we stopped at the Shake Shack (now owned and operated by Ruby's) on PCH for a Date Shake. I had forgotten about this little hideaway gem but the shakes were significantly sweeter than I recalled and could barely drink a few sips before the sugar high set in.

Lunch with a friend that afternoon back in Laguna at first appeared promising; Sushi Laguna on 231 Ocean Avenue. I was very encouraged at the variety that was offered. We started with Ankimo which was not quite as firm as what I am accustomed to but still tasted good. We also ordered fresh sweet shrimp and abalone which provided some very interesting plating - the tail of the sweet shrimp was served next to the abalone shell filled with those slices, and the half of the once-live shrimp was placed vertically for our amusement as he continued to move and squirm during our consumption of his tail; slightly disconcerting as he seized in his death throws but still tasty. Once finished with the plate, the chef offered to fry up the head which he enjoyed. We also enjoyed a soft-shell crab roll and a fresh toro roll along with bottles of Okunomatsu sake.

A delightful day in Laguna was finished up with gelato at Gelato Paradiso. A combination with lemon, mango, raspberry, and peach ended a great art-buying/ocean swimming trip as we headed back to my friend's house to pick his wife up for dinner. They had a great new Indian restaurant they were very happy with called Nirvana at 18774 Brookhurst in Fountain Valley. Much to my regrets, it seems that one of the previously-eaten bits of sushi was not good and while their dinner smelled truly fantastic, I spent more time running into the restaurant's loo to worship the porcelain throne than being able to even visit with my friends. Being the good friends they are, they ate quickly and got me back to their abode where the rest of the evening was spent in the not-too-pleasant manner...

Happily, I believe all is much better as some morning toast has stayed down and I am looking forward to a fabulous evening with friends in Los Angeles and at Valentino's...

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