Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Recommended Posts

I'm new to eGullet but I've used ChefCrash's recipe a few times and it's flawless. Some of the best Baqlawa I've had. Ya3teek il 3afiyeh ChefCrash!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@ChefCrash What a great idea she has! Just joking - I've been doing your method for years. A couple of thoughts. I've always used whole wheat fillo when I can find it and prefer it ten fold. Also, she said the syrup must be cold. I've never worried about that - what's the rationale?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I seem to recall a recipe (can't remember which one, sorry!) that said either the pastry had to be hot and the syrup cool, or the pastry completely cool and the syrup hot. I wonder if it has to do with not getting the phyllo layers completely sogged out?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used Chef Crash's method for maybe the 4th time this holiday season. and did hot on hot - good crunch, no sog- wonderful even a week later

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Syrup should be hot on hot or cold on cold.

 

Like when you wear your diving suit: Dry on dry or wet on wet..........that's until you put on weight and you need a larger size wetsuit :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For cutting, could you brush the top layer with butter before cutting to keep it from drying out and stick it down a bit while you cut? Then add the rest of the butter over the top to soak in? I've never made baklava so there may be some good reason why that wouldn't work. :) (I'm thinking to brush on not much butter, so it isn't super soggy or greasy as you cut, just enough to make the thin layers of filo on top less likely to dry out and shift around.)

 

My main reason for posting is one of the local Greek shops here makes a raspberry baklava that is a bit different and very nice. With all the sweetness of the syrup I can't tell what they are using for the raspberry layer, though - would it be a jam, or just raspberries cooked down into a paste? (It is not a very thick layer so they definitely aren't layering fresh berries in there.) The layering seems to be filo, raspberry stuff, nut layer, filo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/2/2017 at 7:26 AM, gfron1 said:

@ChefCrash What a great idea she has! Just joking - I've been doing your method for years. A couple of thoughts. I've always used whole wheat fillo when I can find it and prefer it ten fold. Also, she said the syrup must be cold. I've never worried about that - what's the rationale?

According to aunt Rita (the same one Maureen mentions in the video), the syrup should be room temp cold not chilled. The rationale is,the cold syrup is better absorbed by the hot baklava.

Since we've always made the syrup before we started on the Baklava it was always at room temperature by the time the baklava was done.

By the way, thirty five or forty years ago if you wanted a tray of Baklava for the holidays, the only way was to placed an order with aunt Rita, may she rest in peace:)

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, quiet1 said:

For cutting, could you brush the top layer with butter before cutting to keep it from drying out and stick it down a bit while you cut? Then add the rest of the butter over the top to soak in? I've never made baklava so there may be some good reason why that wouldn't work. :) (I'm thinking to brush on not much butter, so it isn't super soggy or greasy as you cut, just enough to make the thin layers of filo on top less likely to dry out and shift around.)

 

My main reason for posting is one of the local Greek shops here makes a raspberry baklava that is a bit different and very nice. With all the sweetness of the syrup I can't tell what they are using for the raspberry layer, though - would it be a jam, or just raspberries cooked down into a paste? (It is not a very thick layer so they definitely aren't layering fresh berries in there.) The layering seems to be filo, raspberry stuff, nut layer, filo.

 

I haven't ever known anyone to do this, but, if i were going to do it, I would put in a few thin layers of red raspberry bakery jam. It won't burn, doesn't run, and has a good strong flavor.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks to Heidi for sending me to this thread.  Wow!  I am going to do this very thing.  I just happen to have two boxes of Phyllo in the freezer and orange blossom water and the nuts and all.  Such an interesting thread.  Thanks all. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After all these years I still find this the absolute best. If at all possible get whole wheat fillo which really helps with the sweetness. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On deck for tomorrow. Afraid I'll fall asleep tonight and burn it.... Will post. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×