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currypuff

Wedding Cake books

10 posts in this topic

Anyone have suggestions for good wedding cake books?

I have Simple Art of Perfect Baking by Flo Braker and Wedding Cakes You

Can Make by Dede Wilson...

I've never made a wedding cake before, and would like some books on the

basics, as well as maybe some books about sugar art/flowers, etc...

If this was discussed in a previous thread, my apologies!

Thanks so much :raz:

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Are you looking for recipes, or decorating ideas/instructions and construction tips?

The books you mention are two good ones. In terms of basic construction techniques, you might also want to check out Wilton's books and website - at least it can get you started.

Other suggestions: Toba Garrett's books have lots of techniques in them. Elisa Strauss of Confetti Cakes has a new book out - I paged through it at the bookstore and it had some nice designs (can't speak to the instructional/construction info, I didn't have time to read it all :biggrin:). Colette Peters has several books, but those are going to have more complex construction methods (lots of decorating ideas, though).

Hope that helps, and gfron is right - the wisdom of eGulleteers is an excellent resource!

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It's been a while since I was a caterer, but I used to use Martha Stewart's Weddings and Rose Levy Berenbaum's Cake Bible. I second the Wilton suggestion as well.

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I'm looking for both recipe books and decorating. An easy decorating book to get me started as I have zilch experience in sugar anything... also more ideas to decorate cakes other than fresh flowers or sugar flowers are appreciated.

Thanks for the links! Making a wedding cake looks like it is hard work!

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I'm looking for both recipe books and decorating. An easy decorating book to get me started as I have zilch experience in sugar anything

The Well-Decorated Cake by Toba Garrett has good step-by-step instructions on decorating basics.

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The Cake Bible is a good resource for recipes; there's another version of this book coming out next year. Colette Peters' books are good decorating resources, and Margaret Braun's Cakewalk is in the advanced decorating category and might be a little much for a novice. Dede Wilson has another, earlier book that is geared to the home cook wanting to make a wedding cake - I think the title is The Wedding Cake Book.

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If you're looking for basic recipes, decorating ideas, and methods, maybe take a stroll down the cake-book shelf at your local library? Just search for "cake decorating" in the catalog and it should point you to the right section... my library has a pretty good range of books, from Betty Crocker's decorating tips to cupcake books to Colette Peters and Dede Wilson, so you might find a good range of instructional books to start with. Good luck!

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Thank you to everyone for the suggestions!

I will check them out.. amazon.ca, here I come :wink:

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just wanted to add my two cents- i used the "cake bible" when we made our friends' wedding cake. . .the recipes turned out great, it was the building that we had a few problems with.

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