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rgruby

Cookbook Stores Around the Globe

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I came across this list of cookbook shops on the web: Cookboook shops around the world

I don't know how comprehensive it is, or whether it is completely out of date. For example, I'm Canadian, and I know it is missing at least 2 Canadian cookbook shops.

But, I've never seen such a list before, so I thought I'd share.

If anyone can contribute additions or deletions to the list, please do.

Here's a couple of Canadian ones they missed:

Montreal Cookbook store

Vancouver Cookbook Store

Cheers,

Geoff Ruby

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Well, since you asked....

My husband and I opened a new book store in Portland, Maine dedicated to new, used, out of print and rare books on food, wine, farming/gardening and the arts just three months ago. I know we are not on that list...

Please check out our website to learn more about us. While we only have a small selection on the web, we will be adding more, and you can always call us with any questions. We do all sorts of special orders and book searches and we can ship anywhere.

Or better yet, come to Portland, have a lovely meal at any of a number of world class restaurants, and then spend some time browsing our shelves.

Samantha

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I used to go to Jane's Books near Seattle. I don't think she's open anymore, though. It was partly because I enjoyed that store so much that I sell cookbooks online (other books too.) I'd love to open a cookbook store, but the town I'm in wouldn't support one. Independent bookstores have a hard time in any town these days.

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You'd think there would be quite a bit more entries under the US section. :hmmm:

There's a new & used cookbook store in San Diego, the appropriately named "The Cookbook Store", that I think is relatively new. They're on Adams Avenue which has become an area known for its used books stores.

They've been running a 20% off coupon in the local version of the Reader (a free publication) that says "Cookbook Store - Buy. Sell. Trade. Over 5000 unique cookbooks in stock. Open 11 am-5 pm, closed Sundays. Free parking."

I haven't been to the store yet but plan to the next time I visit my family.

Here's their info in case anyone is interested:

Cookbook Store

4108 Adams Avenue

San Diego, CA 92116

(619) 284-8224

Email: cookwithbabs@cox.net

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In Pasadena, CA there's a store - there's definitely been mention of it on eG in the past.

Cookbooks by Janet Jarvits

and in NYC, Bonnie Slotnick on w. 10th specializes in old cookbooks.


Edited by bloviatrix (log)

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Well, since you asked....

My husband and I opened a new book store in Portland, Maine dedicated to new, used, out of print and rare books on food, wine, farming/gardening and the arts just three months ago.  I know we are not on that list...

Please check out our website to learn more about us. While we only have a small selection on the web, we will be adding more, and you can always call us with any questions.  We do all sorts of special orders and book searches and we can ship anywhere. 

Or better yet, come to Portland, have a lovely meal at any of a number of world class restaurants, and then spend some time browsing our shelves.

Samantha

uh, Samantha, you've got to get better at this whole promotion thing. what's the URL?

eta: there's a very good cookbook store in Los Angeles called Cook's Library. Lots of hard-to-find stuff, including European imports. They've got a website, but I don't think that's a big part of their business.

Cook's Library


Edited by russ parsons (log)

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eta: there's a very good cookbook store in Los Angeles called Cook's Library. Lots of hard-to-find stuff, including European imports. They've got a website, but I don't think that's a big part of their business.

Cook's Library

Russ, you're killing me. I spent a year weeding my cookery library to shift it from Philadelphia to San Diego and am down to a manageable 2,000 volumes. Now, as we plan a drive up the coast to San Francisco next week, I've got yet another place to drop too much money on books. The trick is getting them into the house without raising suspicion...

For those in Amsterdam, there's de Kookboekhandel (http://www.kookboekhandel.com/) and the Friday boekmarkt on Spui which is not strictly cookbooks, but there are a lot of them to be had there.

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Buch Gourmet in Cologne has a wonderful selection of cookbooks in several languages and great customer service for website orders. I buy from them often: http://www.buchgourmet.de/

Powell's in Portland, Oregon also has an extensive cookbook selection, with good prices. And, of course, there's the cookbook section at the Strand in New York, to which I owe a large chunk of my collection.

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You'd think there would be quite a bit more entries under the US section. :hmmm:

There's a new & used cookbook store in San Diego, the appropriately named "The Cookbook Store", that I think is relatively new. They're on Adams Avenue which has become an area known for its used books stores.

They've been running a 20% off coupon in the local version of the Reader (a free publication) that says "Cookbook Store - Buy. Sell. Trade. Over 5000 unique cookbooks in stock. Open 11 am-5 pm, closed Sundays. Free parking."

I haven't been to the store yet but plan to the next time I visit my family.

Here's their info in case anyone is interested:

Cookbook Store

4108 Adams Avenue

San Diego, CA 92116

(619) 284-8224

Email: cookwithbabs@cox.net

The Cookbook Store in SD is nice but very small, unorganized and very crowded.

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The bottom of my posts all have a link directly to our website through the title Rabelais. Thought that was obvious, apologize for any confusion. Never sure how much self promotion is palatable on this forum. To be perfectly clear:

Rabelais deals in fine new, used, out-of-print and rare books on food, wine, farming/gardening and any related arts. We are located on Middle street in Portland, Maine, directly next door to Hugo's, down the block from Duckfat, Norm's, Ribollita and The Pepper Club, around the corner from Fore Street. We are open 7 days a week from 11-7, Sun 11-5. We do searches and special orders, we ship anywhere. Please do check out our website (link above) for more about us and what we do, including press.

For anyone within driving distance, our next event will be August 23rd when we host Margaret Hathaway and Karl Schatz and their new book The Year of the Goat. Margaret will be signing copies of the book, Karl's photographs will be up on the walls, there will be goat cheese to taste and we are working on having a goat or two to meet...

Albest,

Samantha

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I'm resurrecting this topic as I was frustrated by the lack of a good list of cookbook stores, and I needed one for my website. I've spent the last week or two combing through every listing I could find and I've put together what I think is a comprehensive list of every specialty cookbook store in the world. The Sally's Place link posted by the Original Poster is seriously out-of-date, but was a useful starting point.

I'd love to be corrected or find new ones to put on there, so anyone who wants to make suggestions, please do. I've put a list of defunct stores at the bottom of the page (ones I know to be gone or which I couldn't confirm).

http://www.cookbooker.com/bookstores.php

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There's at least one or two mail-order specialists worth mentioning. Jessica's Biscuit (ecookbooks.com) is great if you live someplace without a good cookbook store. It's a real independent bookseller that is mail-order only.

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That's unfortunate indeed; I'll note this on the page. Another one who was initially on my list (Books for Cooks, in London, Canada) emailed me to let me know they are also closing this year. I wonder how many of the ones in my 'vanished stores' list were knocked out by online competition?

Apparently Cook's Library closed due to loss of sales. The LA Times wrote: "She and her staff might spend 30 minutes with a customer, she says, only to have them write down the recommendations and leave — to buy the books over the Internet".

I know people want to save money, but that's terrible behaviour...

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