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Live It Up

Cucina del Sole

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Hello everyone in the Italian Forum. I've just started to read all the regional cooking threads here and they are fascinating. I cook a lot of Italian food, but I rarely do the whole multi course format or pay much attention to what region the dishes are from. I might join in sooner or later, though I realize that the official months are over. Anyway, I am posting this here because I noticed in a couple of the threads (especially Basilicata) there was a lot of talk about the lack of sources. So I was curious if anyone has Nancy Harmon Jenkin's new book Cucina del Sole yet. It seems pretty new, so general thoughts about the author would also be appreciated. I am pretty sure I'm going to buy it, but I just wanted some opinions.

Additionally, and perhaps this isn't the right place for this, but why aren't there more regional cooking projects going on on egullet? I think Spain, France, and China just to name a few would be great for this kind of treatment, though perhaps not as month by month projects.

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docsconz   

I just got a copy of the book and am looking forward to reading it and trying out the recipes. I know Nancy from having taken a culinary trip to Spain with her. She is a pure delight - knowledgeable and witty. Her experience throughout the Mediterranean is extensive. This should be a fine book.

As for the Regional cooking Projects it is simply a matter of someone taking the time to start them. :wink:

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Pontormo   
Hello everyone in the Italian Forum. I've just started to read all the regional cooking threads here and they are fascinating. I cook a lot of Italian food, but I rarely do the whole multi course format or pay much attention to what region the dishes are from. I might join in sooner or later, though I realize that the official months are over.

Additionally, and perhaps this isn't the right place for this, but why aren't there more regional cooking projects going on on egullet? I think Spain, France, and China just to name a few would be great for this kind of treatment, though perhaps not as month by month projects.

First of all, ciao! It's great to see you here!

Second, thanks for the reference to a book that covers Basilicata so well; it sounds as if you really read the regional threads closely and thoroughly if you picked up on areas we all found lacking. Just last weekend Faith Willinger dropped by at my local farmer's market to promote her new regional Italian cookbook while Chef Cesare Lanfranconi prepared one of her recipes. Such books clearly reflect a trend.

Please, please, don't consider the "official" months over. The intention was to circle back and explore more once the first jaunt ended. As you've learned, no doubt, the collaborative enterprise began with the singular effort of Kevin, the specialist for this regional forum who is a little preoccupied with new family responsibilities; Hathor, his co-conspirator, is likewise busy as documented in her thread, "Erba Luna".

In any case, I think activity or reports petered out only because we covered all the regions and new blood is definitely needed to rouse us out of our stupor. At any rate, you'll find us enthusiastic cheerleaders should you care to prepare a dish or two for one of your very late evening meals. You'll notice we were not always traditional about serving course after course, either.

Finally, I second what Doc says. You'll see the Chinese forum cited this region in starting at least one of its cooking threads.

Besides sounding as cranky as Florentines about Florence :wink:, the team of Francophiles used to be represented by a pretty serious, talented home cook. However, during her tenure here, Bleudauvergne never began a regional trek through France. I am guessing that given the role that French cuisine plays among English speakers, it's treated as central to the culture of those of us who join eGullet and thus most of the discussion of French cooking is found in the Cooking forum. Cf. the thread devoted to Paula Wolfert's revised book on SW France, for example. Still, it might be fun to begin a scheduled journey through a discrete part of the world, region by region, month by month.

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Thanks for the replies! I have been looking through my Italian cookbooks and found them pretty lacking in information about the regional origins of the recipes, so I think I will try to pick up a few that do focus on specific regions--starting with this book. I think my goal will be to cook at least one meal from each region and report on it (in the appropriate thread) in some sort of timely manner.

I don't think that I could be relied upon to head up this sort of project, but I would love to see Spanish cuisine in particular get the regional treatment since I keep buying Spanish cookbooks but rarely use them. This forum is such a great resource for Italian cooking and I would love to see the other regional forums flourish in the same way.

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hathor   

Ciao Live It Up!! Your blog was delightful!

I second everything that Docsconz and Pontormo said. "Studying' the regions of Italy was great fun, but it also took a lot of time and dedication. It is certainly my intention to revisit the regional threads whenever I make something from that region.

Between my internet problems, and getting our new restaurant Erba Luna up and running, I'm just happy if we get fed at all! :laugh:

Anyway, it's nice to have you around!!

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weinoo   

Just ordered mine from ecookbooks.com...I think it was around 40% off MSRP, and if you spend over $25, it's free shipping.

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So, I ordered my copy of this book weeks ago, but I just got it a couple of days ago. I wanted to start my regional tour with a meal from this book, but I got impatient and planned a meal before I received it. So, I haven't cooked anything from it yet, but I just wanted to post an update for others considering buying it. You do have to do a bit of intro reading, because the recipes are not all listed in the index according to region. For example, there are only 2 recipes from Basilicata listed in the index, but there are at least 2 others that are attributed to Basilicata when you read the intros. That being said, the majority of the recipes are from Puglia, Campagnia, and Sicily. I am looking forward to cooking from this book, and I will report on the appropriate threads.

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