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Leftover Corn Cobs ...


Shel_B
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The corn is as high

as an elephant's eye ...

and there will be plent of it in the coming weeks. Any ideas about what to do with the leftover cobs?

Shel

 ... Shel


 

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Instead of freezing the cobs (takes valuable venison space in the freezer comes hunting season :biggrin: ) I usually just make "corn stock" which can be frozen flat in ziplocks.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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I just chop into approx. 1" pieces and add to the compost!

Can't save everything (at least they go back into the garden that way).

I've also heard you can run the lawn mower over them to cut up, and then add to compost. The added carbon footprint just doesn't seem worth it to me though. Happy to use a knife and a few extra minutes.

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I just chop into approx. 1" pieces and add to the compost!

Can't save everything (at least they go back into the garden that way).

I've also heard you can run the lawn mower over them to cut up, and then add to compost. The added carbon footprint just doesn't seem worth it to me though. Happy to use a knife and a few extra minutes.

Well, that's a nice idea, but there's no composting here, no lawn mower either.

Shel

 ... Shel


 

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Last year I froze a number of them and used them in soup stocks and chowders where they made sense.

Corn stock .... hmmm, I'll have to look into that. Tks!

Shel

Edited by Shel_B (log)

 ... Shel


 

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Make a lot of snowmen pipes for the winter :laugh:

Corn broth is great in a summer risotto, as a clam chowder base, and in savory custard. Corn custard with fire roasted red peppers...yumm.

Lisa K

Lavender Sky

"No one wants black olives, sliced 2 years ago, on a sandwich, you savages!" - Jim Norton, referring to the Subway chain.

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Leftover corn cobs are a good way to make friends with dogs.

Just take your leftover corn cobs and go to visit any neighboring dog in the area if you do not have your own built-in dog.

Offer them a cob or two to chew on then enjoy the slobbery pleasure evinced. They will think you are a Goddess. Or a God if that is merely your goal.

Move on up the street to find the next dog. Apply corncobs as directed.

You will have a wonderful time.

Much more fulfilling, I assure you, than composting or smoking or boiling the leftover cobs. :smile:

For even the best-made stock cannot smile and waggle its tail the way a dog does. :wink: If you happen across certain breeds of dog , they will even waggle their entire bodies at the pleasure the corn cob offering brings them.

Edited by Carrot Top (log)
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Are asking about cobs that you have cut the corn from or cobs you have eaten the corn from? Last thing I would want to do is use/save a product that had saliva all over it.

BTW, local corn has arrived in Southern Wisconsin as of last Tuesday. Rain has been just right in Kenosha county. The cobs have very thick wrappers. Our local supplier is an old line farmer, so none of the 'Super Sweet' varieties for him, just plain old 'Sweet Corn'. He's at $2.50 dozen and sells out very quickly after he picks. He leaves my order in his pickup otherwise I wouldn't get any it is gone so fast.-Dick

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I actually seem to remember a recipe (seriously :biggrin: ) for homemade corn whiskey (cheap moonshine) that was made with leftover cobs rather than cracked corn or cornmeal. A recipe born of poverty - using what one had. It might have been a Depression-era recipe or it might just have been a traditional Appalachian recipe. I've done a quick search on the web and it is not there, sadly. (My search was very brief - it might be found with more patience but I doubt if I'll make this recipe soon so I didn't look too hard. :raz: )

Edited by Carrot Top (log)
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Leftover corn cobs are a good way to make friends with dogs.

Just take your leftover corn cobs and go to visit any neighboring dog in the area if you do not have your own built-in dog.

Offer them a cob or two to chew on then enjoy the slobbery pleasure evinced. They will think you are a Goddess. Or a God if that is merely your goal.

Move on up the street to find the next dog. Apply corncobs as directed.

You will have a wonderful time.

I don't care much for dogs, but for someone who does, it's a good idea.

Shel

 ... Shel


 

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Are asking about cobs that you have cut the corn from or cobs you have eaten the corn from? Last thing I would want to do is use/save a product that had saliva all over it.

Both - I don't care about the saliva. It's mine, and I'd be using the cobs for my own use. People save chicken bones all the time ...

Shel

 ... Shel


 

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Last year I froze a number of them and used them in soup stocks and chowders where they made sense.

Corn stock .... hmmm, I'll have to look into that. Tks!

Shel

Since I make corn chowder w chicken stock that I store in the freezer, I dump slices of the cobs into thawing stock and simmer the two for around 20 minutes.

If you scrape your cobs daintily when removing kernels for recipes, I'd recommend gutting the stuff left on each row and adding the milky residue to creamed corn, corn puddings, batter for cornbread, the chowder pot, etc.

Gnawed cobs get chucked. Anyone who doesn't eat all but the husk needs a lesson from the Dalai Lama on living fully in the moment. Or maybe a better dentist.

"Viciousness in the kitchen.

The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

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Leftover corn cobs are a good way to make friends with dogs.

Just take your leftover corn cobs and go to visit any neighboring dog in the area if you do not have your own built-in dog.

Offer them a cob or two to chew on then enjoy the slobbery pleasure evinced. They will think you are a Goddess. Or a God if that is merely your goal.

Move on up the street to find the next dog. Apply corncobs as directed.

You will have a wonderful time.

Much more fulfilling, I assure you, than composting or smoking or boiling the leftover cobs.  :smile:

For even the best-made stock cannot smile and waggle its tail the way a dog does.  :wink: If you happen across certain breeds of dog , they will even waggle their entire bodies at the pleasure the corn cob offering brings them.

Please, PLEASE be careful with this. Small dogs only. Unlike bones, corn cobs do NOT digest in a dogs intestine and if swallowed in a large enough piece can cause a blockage in its intestine. Our dog pulled a cob out of the garbage last year, and when it didn't pass after 3 days, had to undergo surgery.... not nice, but they do love them.

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I actually seem to remember a recipe (seriously  :biggrin: ) for homemade corn whiskey (cheap moonshine) that was made with leftover cobs rather than cracked corn or cornmeal. A recipe born of poverty - using what one had. It might have been a Depression-era recipe or it might just have been a traditional Appalachian recipe. I've done a quick search on the web and it is not there, sadly. (My search was very brief - it might be found with more patience but I doubt if I'll make this recipe soon so I didn't look too hard. :raz: )

Search for "corn squeezins".

http://makinghomemadewineandbeer.com/2007/...corn-squeezins/

Pamela Wilkinson

www.portlandfood.org

Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

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Dry them and use them as toilet paper!  :laugh:

This is a function of age, and hearing the "corncob" jokes of 40 or 50 years ago ...

When I saw the post I had to read them and see if any other old folks thought what I did!!!Thanks for saving me...

Bud

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