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debbiemoose

Yogurt makers

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I am thinking about getting a machine to make my own yogurt and I was wondering if anyone else has done this, and does it seem to be worth it - from either a flavor or cost standpoint. I'd want one of the small ones with cups, since I'm the only yogurt eater in my house. How long, in y'all's experience, does the homemade yogurt keep? Thanks!

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Yogurt makers are a crock.

Have you tried making yogurt without one? All you have to do is heat some milk in a pot, take off the heat just as it starts to boil, wait until the temperature drops to about 100* F and add your culture (~1/2 cup of store bought yogurt), stir, place a lid on the pot, place the whole thing on your kitchen counter covered with a towel. About six hours later you should have Yogurt.

As for how long yogurt keeps? I don't know, we go through two gallons a week.

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For all about making yogurt at home, check this.


Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

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So it's really that easy? Does it matter what kind of pot?

You can scald the milk in any pot, once you add the culture, the mixture has to be in a non reactive container (plastic, stainless, glass).

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So it's really that easy? Does it matter what kind of pot?

You can scald the milk in any pot, once you add the culture, the mixture has to be in a non reactive container (plastic, stainless, glass).

I heat the milk in a glass Pyrex measuring bowl in the microwave. :biggrin:

(Half-gallon capacity).

Very easy to clean. :wink:

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I've made it in a big batch in a quart jar and in one of the Salton 5-small jar makers.

For one person, I find the Salton to suit me better: I have a recipe that uses 32 ounces of water, one cup of spray-dried milk [not Carnation], and 1/4 cup of whole yogurt all blended to produce one workweek's worth of yogurt, I know it will take 6 hours from the time I put the liquid in the jars until it's time to place in the fridge, each jar has just enough for one serving [8 ounces], I don't have to worry about the whey separating when I dig a day's amount out of the big jar and disturb whatever is disturbed when you cut into the yogurt with a spoon, and the temperature at which it incubates is consistent regardless of the temp in the house, or my schedule. I don't have to heat milk on the stove, just draw 105 degree water from the tap and add to the blender jar.

It's easy whichever way you do it - I just find the Salton to be more fool-proof than heating pads, tops of fridges, towels....


Edited by memesuze (log)

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I use a good stainless steel thermos works like a dream to make it! just take any recipe and pour it in the thermos then in the same amt of time the Salton or other yogurt maker says to leave it ..leave it you need a good solid thermos but that is a great investment anyway!

since this time of year I eat a cup a day I know it lasts and tastes wonderful for at least a week (it never lasts in this house any longer)

oh and ..I like mine tart so if it is not where it should be I will leave it out sealed on the counter for an extra day..

I keep it in plasti in fact I use Trader Joes Yogurt containers (after running them through the dishwasher) because that is what I use when I need starter! I just use some of the Trader Joes plain whole fat and mix it with the scalded whole fresh milk

it is so easy to make yogurt ! and you can make it as mild or as tart as you like!

and all those good bacterias in there too!!!

and lets not forget all the fresh fruits right now !!! even if it does not get thick (the yogurt you make) you can make wonderful smoothies with runny yogurt so freeze it even!

I think investing in a great thermos is so much better than a limited use yogurt maker

hope this helps


Edited by hummingbirdkiss (log)

why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

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I use a good stainless steel thermos works like a dream to make it! just take any recipe and pour it in the thermos then in the same amt of time the Salton or other yogurt maker says to leave it ..leave it you need a good solid thermos but that is a great investment anyway!

since this time of year I eat a cup a day I know it lasts and tastes wonderful for at least a week (it never lasts in this house any longer)

oh and ..I like mine tart so if it is not where it should be I will leave it out sealed on the counter for an extra day..

I keep it in plasti  in fact I use Trader Joes Yogurt containers (after running them through the dishwasher) because that is what I use when I need starter! I just use some of the Trader Joes plain whole fat and mix it with the scalded whole fresh milk

it is so easy to make yogurt ! and you can make it as mild or as tart as you like!

and all those good bacterias in there too!!!

and lets not forget  all the fresh fruits right now !!! even if it does not get thick (the yogurt you make)  you can make wonderful smoothies with runny yogurt so freeze it even!

I think investing in a great thermos is so much better than a limited use yogurt maker

hope this helps

Thanks for mentioning the Thermos. I've also thought about making yogurt but wasn't sure how I was going to keep it warm.

Love the idea.

Cheryl

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you are most welcome Cheryl!!! it works like a dream!!! I have also heard of folks doing it in mason jars on a heating pad one that you use for back pain but that made me nervous as a possible fire hazzard and it does not sound like even heat... so I never tried it

however a bread proofing box would work perfectly I bet!!!

I have one I made from instructions here on the board it is a foam cooler with a lightbulb inside keeps the interior very warm for proofing bread and would work well I bet for keeping yogurt warm I bet!


why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

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I have a Salton that was given to me about 30 years ago and it is still working. It holds 6 ½ pint glass jars. I used it a lot. It is very convenient, just make it in the jar, refrig it in the jar and eat it out of the jar. If I broke the jars I'd just sub ½ pint or pint canning jars. I've seen at goodwill and the thrift stores going for $5.

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Thanks for all the advice! I'm intrigued by the non-single use appliance options - my stove has a warming oven with a bread proof feature and I wonder if that might be suitable. But the ease of a Salton maker is appealing. Homemade yogurt tastes so much better and I can control what flavorings I may want to put in it. I don't want to make a lot - I'm the sole yogurt eater in my house. My husband is allergic to milk products, and tried the commercial soy yogurt and it was simply hideous. Anyone ever tried homemade soy yogurt, either in the machine or otherwise?

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Thanks for all the advice! I'm intrigued by the non-single use appliance options - my stove has a warming oven with a bread proof feature and I wonder if that might be suitable. But the ease of a Salton maker is appealing. Homemade yogurt tastes so much better and I can control what flavorings I may want to put in it. I don't want to make a lot - I'm the sole yogurt eater in my house. My husband is allergic to milk products, and tried the commercial soy yogurt and it was simply hideous. Anyone ever tried homemade soy yogurt, either in the machine or otherwise?

That's exactly what I have (a 100°F oven setting), and it works perfectly. I'll make 2-3 quarts in a wide-mouth gallon glass jar, then strain it (in batches) through a fine-mesh basket filter, which makes for a wonderfully thick Greek-style yogurt. You can use the whey in pancakes or whatever. Provided you're careful with the temperatures, it's astoundingly easy.


Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

 

-The mosque is too far from home, so let's do this / Let's make a weeping child laugh.

    Nida Fazli, poet, 1938-2016 (translated, from the Urdu, by Anu Garg, wordsmith.org)

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Thanks for all the advice! I'm intrigued by the non-single use appliance options - my stove has a warming oven with a bread proof feature and I wonder if that might be suitable. But the ease of a Salton maker is appealing. Homemade yogurt tastes so much better and I can control what flavorings I may want to put in it. I don't want to make a lot - I'm the sole yogurt eater in my house. My husband is allergic to milk products, and tried the commercial soy yogurt and it was simply hideous. Anyone ever tried homemade soy yogurt, either in the machine or otherwise?

yes I did make "soy yogurt" one time and it was just soft tofu! about half way through making it I realized it was exactly the same thing!


why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

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Here's more than you'd ever need to know about making yogurt without having to purchase special equipment:

Making Yogurt at Home

If you just wanted to buy something new for the kitchen, you might consider an ice cream maker instead.


"Viciousness in the kitchen.

The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

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