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Travelogue: 4 weeks at Sheena mommy's house


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uhhhhh I have no idea how she grows them, but I know that they grow so freakin fast every summer and the leaves taste a BAJILLION times better than the kind you get at the grocery store.  They are also way bigger...sometimes as big as my face, and I have a huge head.  I'll ask her when I go home

I have a huge head too! :raz:

thank you!!! I am excited to try!

why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

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hey, this travelogue/blog is the greatest thing to happen to egullet!!!!!!!  just kidding

Take it easy, Sheena. That :sad: smiley was meant to be a joke. Besides, I was a little sleepy then.

Thanks for the Korean word for yomogi. You were wanted on the Tempura Cook-Off thread.

I'm looking forward to what you are going to do with your konnyaku and shirataki.

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Sheena - really enjoy reading this. Can't wait to see what other food you will introduce to us. BTW, your picture taking is great.

My brother is married to Korean American woman and also live in Maryland. My sister-in-law was happy to move there after spending 3 years in Ithaca which had very limited Asian food products. She tells me there are several very large Korean markets nearby where she can shop. Unfortunately, it is not the best place for Japanese food according to them. Hard to find good Japanese restaurants in Maryland. I'm thinking of sending my brother some Japanese food.

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.... bibimbap is pronounced like this:

bee bim bap, but say it kinda quickly

I laughed to myself thinking of little kids trying to say that! :laugh:

Do Korean children generally eat the same fare as adults? Some of the food seems kind of intense for very young palates. :hmmm:

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Sheena - really enjoy reading this.  Can't wait to see what other food you will introduce to us.  BTW, your picture taking is great. 

My brother is married to Korean American woman and also live in Maryland.  My sister-in-law was happy to move there after spending 3 years in Ithaca which had very limited Asian food products.  She tells me there are several very large Korean markets nearby where she can shop.  Unfortunately, it is not the best place for Japanese food according to them.  Hard to find good Japanese restaurants in Maryland.  I'm thinking of sending my brother some Japanese food.

There are some good Japanese grocery stores in Maryland - one's on Rockville Pike near the Best Buy in Rockville, MD and another is in Bethesda called Daruma. Daruma used to be stellar with the sasadango (spelling) but they stopped making them! Those were the best ever.

Matuba is a decent sushi place in Bethesda that's actually run by Japanese as is Kotobuki in Washington, D.C. Temari is a Japanese cafe that serves ramen and whatnots and is in the same shopping center as the Rockville Japanese grocery store.

But nothing beats the ramen up in NYC...damn, someone needs to open a ramen shop and a yakatori shop in the DC area!

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hey, this travelogue/blog is the greatest thing to happen to egullet!!!!!!!  just kidding

Take it easy, Sheena. That :sad: smiley was meant to be a joke. Besides, I was a little sleepy then.

Thanks for the Korean word for yomogi. You were wanted on the Tempura Cook-Off thread.

I'm looking forward to what you are going to do with your konnyaku and shirataki.

hiroyuki, I was just kidding...sorry if I offended you :biggrin: . I wish I could've contributed to the tempura cook off thread. Now I really want some sweet potato tempura.

do you have any suggestions for the konnyaku and shirataki?

Sheena - really enjoy reading this.  Can't wait to see what other food you will introduce to us.  BTW, your picture taking is great. 

My brother is married to Korean American woman and also live in Maryland.  My sister-in-law was happy to move there after spending 3 years in Ithaca which had very limited Asian food products.  She tells me there are several very large Korean markets nearby where she can shop.  Unfortunately, it is not the best place for Japanese food according to them.  Hard to find good Japanese restaurants in Maryland.  I'm thinking of sending my brother some Japanese food.

wow thanks for the compliment, very nice of you. Yeah there are way more koreans than japanese here. If I eat japanese food over here, its usually at a korean japanese restaurant that's run by koreans. I actually go to an all you can eat sushi lunch buffet over near college park that's pretty good and less than $10. My mom and I love it.

.... bibimbap is pronounced like this:

bee bim bap, but say it kinda quickly

I laughed to myself thinking of little kids trying to say that! :laugh:

Do Korean children generally eat the same fare as adults? Some of the food seems kind of intense for very young palates. :hmmm:

they do eat the same fare as adults, but I'm sure they are like japanese children and would probably prefer things like tonkatsu, ramen, snacks, and curry. Kimchi can be too spicy for korean children so sometimes its rinsed off in a little water. My mother used to run mine under the faucet when I was in elementary school, because I couldn't handle the spice

I had to stop by to say hi. It's always great to see Korean food related threads.

Cheers :laugh:

hey, its one of my favorite contributors to the korean home cooking thread!

Sheena - really enjoy reading this.  Can't wait to see what other food you will introduce to us.  BTW, your picture taking is great. 

My brother is married to Korean American woman and also live in Maryland.  My sister-in-law was happy to move there after spending 3 years in Ithaca which had very limited Asian food products.  She tells me there are several very large Korean markets nearby where she can shop.  Unfortunately, it is not the best place for Japanese food according to them.  Hard to find good Japanese restaurants in Maryland.  I'm thinking of sending my brother some Japanese food.

There are some good Japanese grocery stores in Maryland - one's on Rockville Pike near the Best Buy in Rockville, MD and another is in Bethesda called Daruma. Daruma used to be stellar with the sasadango (spelling) but they stopped making them! Those were the best ever.

Matuba is a decent sushi place in Bethesda that's actually run by Japanese as is Kotobuki in Washington, D.C. Temari is a Japanese cafe that serves ramen and whatnots and is in the same shopping center as the Rockville Japanese grocery store.

But nothing beats the ramen up in NYC...damn, someone needs to open a ramen shop and a yakatori shop in the DC area!

hey, I work in rockville (thats where I am right now) and maybe I should hit up some of these shops with my mom and little sis! Thanks for the great info. Do you live around here?

Yes I know, I haven't posted any pics in a long time. Yesterday after work I had to head down to the bar and have a few drinks. Things got out of hand and well I'm hungover and hungry (i didn't eat anything for dinner yesterday). I'll make it up to you by posting some pics later of food related things. Thanks for sticking with me

BEARS, BEETS, BATTLESTAR GALACTICA
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oh and by the way in Korea, you always call a woman (with children) her oldest child's name + mom.  So since I'm the oldest, my mother is known as Sheena momma or Sheena amma by all of her friends....hence the title of the thread.

How interesting. My parents call each other Kent's mom/dad, though this is not common in China.

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]Finally, I'm not so lazy so I'm going to post some pics.

Tonight for dinner I had steak, potato, mustard greens and some sausage so I didn't take a pic of that. However my sister and her boyfriend took me out to get some snowballs in the area. I got egg custard (my favorite) with three levels of marshmallow. I could only eat a third of it....and my sister ate a peach one with marshmallow. My sister is reading this right now and said "oh my god, how fat are you"

pics of snowballs

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a lot of flavours

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I should be banned for my pic taking skills

The other day I had some kalgooksu and my mom made it super fast with some chicken and water, garlic, and noodles. After the chicken is boiled and lends its flavor to the broth, my mom shreds the chicken into the soup and adds the noodles. My mom also makes a kind of spicy condiment that we like to stir into the soup. it's soy sauce with lots and lots of jalapenos added to it. You can see it on the top of the soup. I also ate some leftover spicy crab and some not so ready kimchi

a>

BEARS, BEETS, BATTLESTAR GALACTICA
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Dear Sheena - I am probably not the only one envying this fun time you are having with your mommy.  It makes me miss mine so much!

awww, hooray for mommys

do you have any suggestions for the konnyaku and shirataki?

How about dengaku for konnyaku and salad for shirataki?

sounds great, thanks for the suggestion

This thread rocks :biggrin: Kamsahamnida

cholmonayo? is that correct?

BEARS, BEETS, BATTLESTAR GALACTICA
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I like snacks, most notably savory snacks. My most favorite thing to snack on ever is probably dried squid. I like to run it over the electric burner to toast it or sometimes I'll boil it for a few minutes in a little water. My favorite way to eat it is to dip it in some mayo....and yes that's how people really eat it in korea. My mom bought me a very large (25 squid) packet back from korea, bc she knows I love it so much

gallery_44829_4875_25076.jpg

Here's the cooking process

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end product

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anyone prefer hellman's over kraft mayo? I tried kraft mayo for the first time yesterday and I gagged a little :wacko:

Today my sister, her friend, and I all went to this restaurant called "Noodles Corner" in Columbia, MD. It's an asian restaurant that specializes in noodles from all over asia. I had something called "Laksa noodles" and I have no idea where they came from. I just know that the broth was a spicy fish broth with lime juice, lots of noodles, shrimp, and yummy fish balls. Here's a pic

gallery_44829_4875_7471.jpg

Later for dinner, my mom and I ate together. My sister is at work till 9:30 and my father is attending a meeting till 11 pm tonight....the poor guy. We pretty much only ate snacks for dinner and leftovers. We finished off the leftover pigs feet, some left over dak dori tang (spicy chicken stew with potatos), and some golbangi, which are sea snails seasoned with chile flakes, rice vinegar, sesame seeds, little bit of sugar, and lots and lots of garlic chives.

golbangi on the left and pigs feet on the right

gallery_44829_4875_37832.jpg

dakdoritang on a plate and in a pot

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and here's what my mother is going to work with tomorrow. Anyone guess what it is?

gallery_44829_4875_58311.jpg

tomorrow I'm going to my grandmother's house and I believe we are having half a bushel of crabs (thank you jesus), ice cold beer, and some other things.

BEARS, BEETS, BATTLESTAR GALACTICA
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oh and by the way in Korea, you always call a woman (with children) her oldest child's name + mom.  So since I'm the oldest, my mother is known as Sheena momma or Sheena amma by all of her friends....hence the title of the thread.

How interesting. My parents call each other Kent's mom/dad, though this is not common in China.

I wonder why they do that? I think they may do the same in japan, but I am not really sure

Nice to see so much Korean home cooking!

Could your mom make some ganpoongki?

I have no idea what that is? but I am sure I will like it

BEARS, BEETS, BATTLESTAR GALACTICA
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oh and by the way in Korea, you always call a woman (with children) her oldest child's name + mom.  So since I'm the oldest, my mother is known as Sheena momma or Sheena amma by all of her friends....hence the title of the thread.

How interesting. My parents call each other Kent's mom/dad, though this is not common in China.

I wonder why they do that? I think they may do the same in japan, but I am not really sure

We don't. Calling a woman any of her children's names + no (= 's) + mama or okaasan is quite common, though.

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gampunggi = chicken (often wings, but I don't think it has to be) in a sweet, sticky, slightly spicy sauce. With the ubiquitous sesame seeds. And I believe laksa is Malay in origin.

mmmmm jokbal.

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and here's what my mother is going to work with tomorrow. Anyone guess what it is?

OK, I give up....what is it? :biggrin:

Can you describe a little more what the texture of the dried squid is like? After toasting, is it completely dry and crisp, or is it more like beef jerky? What is it like after boiling briefly?

Hope your mouth is healed! I've been enjoying this.thread immensely...

And I want my mommy! :sad: (even though I'm quite certain she's never cooked Korean food in her life :raz: )

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anyone prefer hellman's over kraft mayo?  I tried kraft mayo for the first time yesterday and I gagged a little  :wacko:

OH YEAH ! :wub: Hellman's aka Best Foods mayo (that's the brand name west of the Mississippi) is the ONLY prepared mayo that should be allowed to exist.

All the others are just plain nasty.

ETA: Mommies ARE the best, and enjoy your time with yours. Its more important that you realize.....

Edited by Pierogi (log)

--Roberta--

"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley

Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

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gampunggi = chicken (often wings, but I don't think it has to be) in a sweet, sticky, slightly spicy sauce.  With the ubiquitous sesame seeds.  And I believe laksa is Malay in origin.

mmmmm jokbal.

Laksa is indeed Malaysian.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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oh and by the way in Korea, you always call a woman (with children) her oldest child's name + mom.  So since I'm the oldest, my mother is known as Sheena momma or Sheena amma by all of her friends....hence the title of the thread.

How interesting. My parents call each other Kent's mom/dad, though this is not common in China.

I wonder why they do that? I think they may do the same in japan, but I am not really sure

We don't. Calling a woman any of her children's names + no (= 's) + mama or okaasan is quite common, though.

so it's not necessarily the oldest?

and here's what my mother is going to work with tomorrow. Anyone guess what it is?

OK, I give up....what is it? :biggrin:

Can you describe a little more what the texture of the dried squid is like? After toasting, is it completely dry and crisp, or is it more like beef jerky? What is it like after boiling briefly?

Hope your mouth is healed! I've been enjoying this.thread immensely...

And I want my mommy! :sad: (even though I'm quite certain she's never cooked Korean food in her life :raz: )

nope, my mouth isn't healed. I actually got 2 more in the same side of my mouth. You know my mom said that you get them from not getting enough sleep. I didn't believe her, but all this week I've been surviving on 5 hours of sleep a night so she may be right.

gampunggi = chicken (often wings, but I don't think it has to be) in a sweet, sticky, slightly spicy sauce.  With the ubiquitous sesame seeds.  And I believe laksa is Malay in origin.

mmmmm jokbal.

oh, my mom has never made chicken wings like that. I may ask her to try it out though. Maybe we could do it together.

ahhh, I thought laksa might be malaysian, thanks guys....

Laksa is indeed Malaysian.

and here's what my mother is going to work with tomorrow.  Anyone guess what it is? 

Yoonhi's betting on patjuk (sweet red bean gruel).

Is she going to put in rice ball dumplings?

I thought it was patjook too. I found out though, that its boiled adzuki beans for stuffing into homemade mochi. I got really excited, because she hasn't made homemade red bean mochi in a long long time. My mom is the best (: She also made homemade mugwort rice cakes that I forgot to take a photo of and I also forgot to take them to work today for a snack. However I did pack myself some shirataki noodles, wasabi, cucumbers, and some noodle soup base. I'm going to make myself my own bastardized version of soba noodles (or whatever they are called). I'm sure all the japanese hate me bc I'm using shirataki as opposed to buckwheat....but I'm trying to watch my weight. Sorry! :wacko:

BEARS, BEETS, BATTLESTAR GALACTICA
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oh and by the way in Korea, you always call a woman (with children) her oldest child's name + mom.  So since I'm the oldest, my mother is known as Sheena momma or Sheena amma by all of her friends....hence the title of the thread.

How interesting. My parents call each other Kent's mom/dad, though this is not common in China.

I wonder why they do that? I think they may do the same in japan, but I am not really sure

We don't. Calling a woman any of her children's names + no (= 's) + mama or okaasan is quite common, though.

so it's not necessarily the oldest?

No, it's not. Is it because of Confucianism that a mom is called that way in Korea?

No Japanese hates you for using shirataki for noodles, but we simply don't call your version soba because soba means buckwheat.

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