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I though I may get my questions answered about making souffles since i just recently tryed to make one.

A few weeks ago, I made a chocolate souffles recipe I found in a cookbook at my school and tried it out. I used the 8 oz souffle dishes. I think they come out perfect. They didn't sink until they cooled , but the where still liquidy inside. I also tryed to get the hat looking shape on top, but it didn't work. My instructor though they were possibly under cooked :blink: ( this was her first time with souffles too). The tops were cooked. It tasted fine and no one got sick off of it. Anyway, I was wondering what a cooked souffle should look like, should it by somewhat runny on the inside or cake-like ? What did I do wrong when i tried to get the hat shape ?

Like I said this was my first attempt at it and i am just a beginner at this subject. Can anyone give me some feedback so next time i try it i'll know ? Thanks

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Being no souffle expert, I'll let others answer, but if I'm not incorrect you're attempting these at high altitude which may play an important role. I know everything I bake takes much, much longer to cook...and if I'm not incorrect, we're at about the same elevation - give or a take a few inches :wink:

Here's a few links to get you started:

Basics

Secrets

Egg basics

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The inside of a properly baked souffle should be mousse-like, foamy and slightly creamy. Note that this is the inside, about 1/2-1/4 inch in. The outside, especially the top, should be set but not crusty.

The souffle will be a bit different if there is flour (as in a roux or white sauce), and whether it is based on chocolate, cheese or some kind of fruit puree. Flour stabilizes and browns more but mutes flavor, especially in chocolate souffles.

Key points:

1. prep the molds: coat with softened butter and a pastry brush. Put some sugar in and swirl it to coat the whole side of the dish, then pour out the rest of the sugar. This allows the expanding egg foam to climb.

2. Whip the whites to soft peaks, no more, and fold quickly but thoroughly -- leave streaks rather than overfolding.

3. Don't overfill -- for an 8 oz mold (serves 2 imho) leave about 1/2 inch.

4. Put into a hot oven without delay. Standing around, especially in a hot kitchen, will kill them or at least not let them puff to their best.

5. Bake through. The bigger the dish, the longer the baking time. Feel around the edge and the side that pops from the mold -- it should be slightly firm, not wet. Don't waste time with the oven door open, just stick your hand in an tap quickly.

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In the Julia Child French Chef series (available on DVD), Julia makes and displays a souffle. Easy to see texture there if you have access to the show.

I like to bake nice things. And then I eat them. Then I can bake some more.

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I like freezing my souffles once I put them in the ramekin. Whenever I want a souffle, I pop a few into a HOT oven and walk away for 15-20 minutes. They come out perfect every time with just the right bit of custardy mousse like center, and set outside.

I would definitely agree with not overfilling them.....I've had recurring nightmares like that giant snake South Park episode when my Souffles grew, and grew, and grew.

For a little Variety, experiment with what you prep the molds with. Try different sugars, cheeses, oils, butters to see what you like. Its wonderful to have a little contrast from the edge of the souffle.

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