• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Craig Camp

All About Pasta

202 posts in this topic

While driving through Iowa last year we passed the giant Barilla pasta plant. I have to wonder how the Italian executives are enjoying living in Ames, Iowa after leaving their offices in Parma, Roma and Milano. I have tasted both the Italian version and American version of Barilla side by side and there is a major difference. The American version has a softer texture and is much more difficult to cook ‘al dente’. While Barilla is no ones benchmark of great pasta the comparison does raise many questions about the raw materials used in production. After all the wheat used in both is durum wheat semolina. I would assume the machinery used is the same.

De Cecco remains my dried pasta of choice in the USA as it is so readily available and consistent. Are there American brands (not fresh) that can maintain an ‘al dente’ texture as successfully as Italian brands? If so, what are they?

I will also say the same thing about the cheap imported Italian brands as they also go from undercooked to overcooked without ever hitting the right point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
While driving through Iowa last year we passed the giant Barilla pasta plant. I have to wonder how the Italian executives are enjoying living in Ames, Iowa after leaving their offices in Parma, Roma and Milano. I have tasted both the Italian version and American version of Barilla side by side and there is a major difference. The American version has a softer texture and is much more difficult to cook ‘al dente’. While Barilla is no ones benchmark of great pasta the comparison does raise many questions about the raw materials used in production. After all the wheat used in both is durum wheat semolina. I would assume the machinery used is the same.

De Cecco remains my dried pasta of choice in the USA as it is so readily available and consistent. Are there American brands (not fresh) that can maintain an ‘al dente’ texture as successfully as Italian brands? If so, what are they?

I will also say the same thing about the cheap imported Italian brands as they also go from undercooked to overcooked without ever hitting the right point.

I think you answered your own question...Dececco is probably the best you can get in The United States....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're probably right. I always think I am missing one.

By the way, those of you in England, does this hold true there too?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There was a poll here about this around October. I'm pretty sure Dececco didn't win, although it's what I usually buy.

Isn't a lot of Italian pasta made with US/Canadian wheat?


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I read somewhere that the type ("hardness") of flour used in dried pasta differs between America and Italy because different strains of wheat are grown in each country -- I cannot remember the source of the assertion.

De Cecco was the only workable dried pasta that I found when I lived in Chicago, and back then (1980s) it was hard to find. I am sure it is more common now.


Jonathan Day

"La cuisine, c'est quand les choses ont le go�t de ce qu'elles sont."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There was a poll here about this around October. I'm pretty sure Dececco didn't win, although it's what I usually buy.

Isn't a lot of Italian pasta made with US/Canadian wheat?

Yes they import a lot of wheat. So the question may be - do they make it differently for the American market?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the UK most of the dried pasta you find comes directly from Italy; this is true both in Italian speciality shops and in the supermarkets. The supermarkets' private label pastas are not bad; Sainsbury's even has some high-end lines of artisanal pastas, e.g. strozzapretri and those Sardinian pastas whose name I forget. Not as good as what you can get from esperya.com, but not bad.


Jonathan Day

"La cuisine, c'est quand les choses ont le go�t de ce qu'elles sont."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I read somewhere that the type ("hardness") of flour used in dried pasta differs between America and Italy because different strains of wheat are grown in each country -- I cannot remember the source of the assertion.

De Cecco was the only workable dried pasta that I found when I lived in Chicago, and back then (1980s) it was hard to find. I am sure it is more common now.

This is true, but it is my understanding that Barilla is paying farmers to grow a specific variety - not just buying off the market. I suppose it like wine - just because you transplant the vine does not mean the wine is the same.

As far as Chicago goes you can even buy De Cecco at Jewel now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rustichella del'Abruzzo is nearly ubiquitous here in Portland. It's a more traditional dried pasta..brass or bronze dies, slow air-drying, etc. These pastas really do taste better, hold the sauce, and have a noticeably different taste and texture. They are more expensive, typically $4/lb or more.

I imported some pasta made for Don Alfonso that was similar, but I didn't really want to expand my little business beyond olive oil. The most interesting was a shape called candele lunghe (I think that's the right spelling...means long candles). These were tubes about 3/8 inch dia and 18 inches long, very dramatic looking. When I asked Ernesto Iaccarino how they cooked them at the restaurant, he said they broke them up.

The biggest problem with these artisinal pastas is that it's hard to go back the industrial stuff.

Jim


olive oil + salt

Real Good Food

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rustichella D'Abruzzo is imported to the U.S. by Manicaretti Inc.-www.manicaretti.com.I love the stuff-it's worth the money.Maybe you can contact them and find out a local source.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like Belvedere. De Cecco is most consistent and easy to find. When I lived in St. Louis it was Ravarino e Freschi.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trader Joe's sells a premium pasta imported from Italy. I don't remember the brand, but it's made from Italian durum wheat and they use bronze dies and low pressure, then dry at low temp for three days. The surface texture is much rougher that other commercial brands. Comes in a hand-wrapped, yellow paper package with a cellophane window. About two bucks a pound. I don't tend to eat a lot of pasta, but I've been wanting to give this stuff a try.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried the TJ one. It's pretty good but takes a little longer to cook.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Many people will say I am crazy, but I actually think Ronzoni is pretty decent. We keep Barilla and a few others in house -- mainly for shape variety. De Cecco is also pretty good.

At a certain price level, most dried pastas are pretty much equally good.


Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Comes in a hand-wrapped, yellow paper package with a cellophane window. About two bucks a pound. I don't tend to eat a lot of pasta, but I've been wanting to give this stuff a try.

Soem friends gave me a package of this. It was great. I have been looking for it ever since, but we don't have TJ's here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trader Joe's sells a premium pasta imported from Italy. I don't remember the brand, but it's made from Italian durum wheat and they use bronze dies and low pressure, then dry at low temp for three days. The surface texture is much rougher that other commercial brands. Comes in a hand-wrapped, yellow paper package with a cellophane window. About two bucks a pound. I don't tend to eat a lot of pasta, but I've been wanting to give this stuff a try.

I'm always impressed by nightscotsman's comments, so I made haste to Trader Joe's.

pasta is called "Tusancia" and is packaged in a tan paper wrapper with a see-thru window. The Florham Park NJ shop had six varieties, I bought a Tacconi. That's a 1 inch by 1 inch piece, with fluted edges. Rough finish, about 1/8 inch thick. 500g cost 1.99 or about 1.79 per pound.

Other varieties included a taglietelle, a fluted thing about four inches long, a penne rigati, and a vermicelli. The label says "authentic handmade Italian pasta" on the front. In the back it says "via statale del brennaro, 357" and S. Giuliano Terme (P) for Tusacania Ospedelaletto

UPC fans may appreciate 36320 10001

It had a very al dente, toothy taste to it. Took 20 minutes at a low, rolling boil. Served with melted butter and lightly browned garlic alongside grilled giant scallops with a dash of pesto from last summer's garden. Had a mix of frisee and spinach with it.


Apparently it's easier still to dictate the conversation and in effect, kill the conversation.

rancho gordo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Da cecco's here too. And I was extremely pleased and gratified to see it being used at a restaurant in Rome - perhaps I should have left immediately but the food was pretty good!

We sometimes get bucatini(?) - fat, hollow spaghetti - made by that other ubiquitous brand with the transparent, cellophane wrapping and the dark green logo .... aah. Can't remember. I'll come back and edit when I do ...

Anyone else here get suckered into paying eight euros to go to the museum of pasta in Rome?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I read somewhere that the type ("hardness") of flour used in dried pasta differs between America and Italy because different strains of wheat are grown in each country -- I cannot remember the source of the assertion.

The product in question is, specifically, durum. My understanding is that Italy imports most of its durum, and that the US is the largest source, followed by Canada and Australia. There is also some coming in from Greece, Spain, Turkey, and Syria, or at least that's what I've read. In any event, durum specifically and wheat in general do not, as far as I know, display "terroir" to the extent fruits like grapes do. So if there is a difference between pasta from Italy and pasta from the North America, it is likely attributable to post-harvest processes: either the milling of the durum or the specific practices with regard to pasta-making.


Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is clear there are many wonderful small Italian producers and De Cecco is king of the big brands. However, is anyone in the USA making serious pasta (other than fresh)?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've not tasted any truly fantastic artisanal pasta from anywhere but Italy. As to the question of why, I assume it's because nobody will pay $4 per pound for pasta from anywhere else.


Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Many people will say I am crazy, but I actually think Ronzoni is pretty decent. We keep Barilla and a few others in house -- mainly for shape variety. De Cecco is also pretty good.

At a certain price level, most dried pastas are pretty much equally good.

I will back you up on Ronzoni. At least as far as American brands are concerned. All the others I've tried don't cook up right, are too gummy, or have no flavor whatsoever.

As for readily-available Italian, DeCecco all the way. Consistently correct timings, and good flavor. Everytime I used to hear those commercials touting Barilla as "the most popular pasta in Italy," I think yeah, but isn't Budweiser the most popular beer here? :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As for readily-available Italian, DeCecco all the way. Consistently correct timings, and good flavor. Everytime I used to hear those commercials touting Barilla as "the most popular pasta in Italy," I think yeah, but isn't Budweiser the most popular beer here? 

Hai capito! The perfect comparison.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trader Joe's sells a premium pasta imported from Italy. I don't remember the brand, but it's made from Italian durum wheat and they use bronze dies and low pressure, then dry at low temp for three days. The surface texture is much rougher that other commercial brands. Comes in a hand-wrapped, yellow paper package with a cellophane window. About two bucks a pound. I don't tend to eat a lot of pasta, but I've been wanting to give this stuff a try.

I'm always impressed by nightscotsman's comments, so I made haste to Trader Joe's.

pasta is called "Tusancia" and is packaged in a tan paper wrapper with a see-thru window. The Florham Park NJ shop had six varieties, I bought a Tacconi. That's a 1 inch by 1 inch piece, with fluted edges. Rough finish, about 1/8 inch thick. 500g cost 1.99 or about 1.79 per pound.

Other varieties included a taglietelle, a fluted thing about four inches long, a penne rigati, and a vermicelli. The label says "authentic handmade Italian pasta" on the front. In the back it says "via statale del brennaro, 357" and S. Giuliano Terme (P) for Tusacania Ospedelaletto

UPC fans may appreciate 36320 10001

It had a very al dente, toothy taste to it. Took 20 minutes at a low, rolling boil. Served with melted butter and lightly browned garlic alongside grilled giant scallops with a dash of pesto from last summer's garden. Had a mix of frisee and spinach with it.

On the recommendations here I went and tried out this pasta from Trader Joe's and I have to say it is excellent, richer and more complex than De Cecco. The rough texture catches the sauce perfectly.

One thing about the cooking - I can't believe 20 minutes was the right time.

Here is how I cook dried pasta:

Bring as much cold, fresh water as you can to a full boil - at least 5 to 6 quarts for 4 servings. I suggest covering the pot.

When it comes to a boil add 1 tbls. Sea salt per 100 grams of pasta. 100 grams serves one person as main dish, 75 grams for a first course. Never add oil to the water – the sauce won’t stick.

When the water returns to a full boil add the pasta, stir and cover until the water returns to a full boil. Stir lightly every minute or so.

When the pasta is just al dente pour a glass of cold water into the pot, then drain. Do not drain the pasta so much it is very dry. Add to the sauce and sauté briefly to finish cooking the pasta.

The Tuscancia Tacconi took 12 minutes to reach the al dente point

.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've not tasted any truly fantastic artisanal pasta from anywhere but Italy. As to the question of why, I assume it's because nobody will pay $4 per pound for pasta from anywhere else.

Unless of course it was prepared by a French chef.


"These pretzels are making me thirsty." --Kramer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
When the pasta is just al dente pour a glass of cold water into the pot, then drain. Do not drain the pasta so much it is very dry. Add to the sauce and sauté briefly to finish cooking the pasta.

Why do you add a glass of cold water to the pot.

johnjohn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Similar Content

    • By DianaB
      Just found out that a member of eGullet, @Cia has begun to post his short videos on Italian culinary culture on YouTube.  Only one to date but I know there are more in the pipeline.  While made by an Italian based in Italy the narrative is in English.
       
      Here's the first instalment: 
       
       
       
    • By Gunnsr42
      Hello foodies. Tell us what work of art you're cooking for your meals these days. 
    • By shain
      Makes 40 cookies, 2 loaves. 
       
      50-60 g very aromatic olive oil
      80 g honey 
      120 to 150 g sugar (I use 120 because I like it only gently sweet) 
      2 eggs
      2 teaspoons of fine lemon zest, from apx 1 lemon 
      230 g flour 
      1 teaspoon salt 
      1 teaspoon baking powder 
      75 g lightly toasted peeled pistachios
      50 g lightly toasted almonds (you can replace some with pine nuts) 
      Optional: a little rosemary or anise seed
      Optional: more olive oil for brushing
       
      Heat oven to 170 deg C.
      In mixer (or by hand), mix oil, honey, sugar, lemon, egg and if desired, the optional spices - until uniform. 
      Separately mix together the flour, salt and baking powder. 
      Add flour mixture to mixer bowel with liquids and fold until uniform. Dough will be sticky and quite stiff. Don't knead or over mix. 
      Add nuts and fold until well dispersed. 
      On a parchment lined baking tray, create two even loaves of dough. 
      With moist hands, shape each to be rectangular and somewhat flat - apx 2cm heigh, 6cm wide and 25cm long. 
      Bake 25 to 30 minutes until golden and baked throughout, yet somewhat soft and sliceable. Rotate pan if needed for even baking. 
      Remove from tray and let chill slightly or completely. 
      Using a sharp serrated knife, gently slice to thin 1/2 cm thick cookies. Each loaf should yield 20 slices. 
      Lay slices on tray and bake for 10 minutes. Flip and bake for another 10-15 minutes until complelty dry and lightly golden. 
      Brush with extra olive oil, if desired. This will and more olive flavor. 
      Let chill completely before removing from tray. 
      Cookies keep well in a closed container and are best served with desert wines or herbal tea. 
       
        
    • By JoNorvelleWalker
      Steve Sando had a nice write up in the Times:
       
      http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/06/dining/marcella-hazan-rancho-gordo-beans.html?ref=dining
       
       
      According to FedEx tracking my Marcella beans (and others) are due to arrive tomorrow.
    • By Suzi Edwards
      i made some pesto on saturday and was wondering how long people would keep it for in the fridge. my partner is happy to scrape mould off stuff (bleurgh) and he says it will keep until saturday. i don't believe him...
      any ideas?
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.