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awbrig

Togarashi-anyone had it?

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My Scallop-Crab Cakes with Hot and Sour Mango Slices with Cilantro Juice recipe calls for 1/2 teaspoon togarashi. Anyone had or made this spice and what does it taste like. I cant seem to find it any where in Chicago...

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Togarashi is basically the Japanese version of red pepper flakes. Its powdered, grains about the size of a grain of salt, and has a kick similar to a hit of wasabi...which is to say, not hot at all. (well, at least not to me)

SA

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It's Japanese chile powder with sesame, seaweed, and cirus peel.


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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it has black sesame seeds

paprika

basil

bay leaves

szechwan black pepper

cayenne pepper

red chiles

sea salt

orange zest

however I dont want to make it myself and would prefer to buy it already premade...do you find it a definate ingrediant you must have or someething you could pas over equivalent to a few red pepper flakes...

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awbrig, that's shichimi, a particular kind of togarashi. Except that seems to be a Westernized version. Real shichimi doesn't use parika, basil, or bay. It does have hemp seeds though.

Anyway, the stuff is fairly common. Pick some up in Chinatown sometime.

As for substitutions, I don't know what recipe you're using and if your intention is to create a replica of a specific dish you've had. But I'd say a bit of cayenne would do.


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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I've got S & B brand Nanami Togarashi, which I always referred to as shichimi. It's in a small bottle with a red cap, and is made from "chili pepper, sesame, seaweed, and orange peel" according to the label. Also have green-capped Sansho from House Foods Corporation, which only lists Japanese peppers but smells very citrusy. Both are available in Japanese stores.

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Shichimi togarashi is "7-spice" whereas ichimi togarashi is "1-spice". They are two different types of togarashi. They have diferent ingredients although chili pepper is common in both. My experience is that when a recipe just says togarashi, ichimi is called for.


Bouland

a.k.a. Peter Hertzmann

à la carte

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togarashi is actually a misnomer, togarashi is actually the name of a small hot red pepper. Occasionally sold fresh it is much more common dried (whole).

When it is ground (usually more of a flake) it is called ichimi or one flavor and this is what your cookbook is probably referring to. Ichimi does not contain the seeds, so is a little milder than red pepper flakes.

shichimi means seven spice and consists of togarashi flakes, sansho (Japanese pepper pods), dried mandarin orange peel, black hemp seeds (or sometimes poppy seeds), dark green nori seaweed bits and white sesame seeds. Occasionaly other things can be added in addition, on eof the most popular being yuzu (citron).

In Japan there is also aotogarashi (a green pepper that they call blue) and akatogarashi (a red pepper) both of these are also sold only in their fresh form and are fairly mild, maybe similar to an anaheim.

In Japan they sell both shichimi and sansho is small bottles with a mill attatched, so you grind it yourself when you need it, the flavor is soooo different from the regular bottled stuff. If you can find it where you are give it a try.


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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