Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

eG Foodblog: Shalmanese - An Itinerent Chef


Recommended Posts

Maybe you glossed over it in my prior post, but could you tell me about Portuguese chicken and what distinguishes it from other varieties?

I am just popping in here - and here I was thinking Nando's was out-and-out South African - nando's is flame-grilled young chicken spatchcocked and marinaded in piri-piri sauce - oil with garlic and hot chilli flavour (sometimes with a touch of vinegar) and I am sure that it comes from Mocambique and Angola - I notice now the query was halfway answered above

Edited by Tjaart (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Maybe you glossed over it in my prior post, but could you tell me about Portuguese chicken and what distinguishes it from other varieties?

I am just popping in here - and here I was thinking Nando's was out-and-out South African - nando's is flame-grilled young chicken spatchcocked and marinaded in piri-piri sauce - oil with garlic and hot chilli flavour (sometimes with a touch of vinegar) and I am sure that it comes from Mocambique and Angola - I notice now the query was halfway answered above

Thank you for answering the followup question before I asked it.

This sounds simple and delicious. It also sounds like something I could reproduce easily on my countertop grill, minus the flame part.

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Maybe you glossed over it in my prior post, but could you tell me about Portuguese chicken and what distinguishes it from other varieties?

I am just popping in here - and here I was thinking Nando's was out-and-out South African - nando's is flame-grilled young chicken spatchcocked and marinaded in piri-piri sauce - oil with garlic and hot chilli flavour (sometimes with a touch of vinegar) and I am sure that it comes from Mocambique and Angola - I notice now the query was halfway answered above

Thank you for answering the followup question before I asked it.

This sounds simple and delicious. It also sounds like something I could reproduce easily on my countertop grill, minus the flame part.

A good idea is to make 2 to 3 diagonal slits in the thighs and breasts to make sure the chicken cooks before it burns, and important to baste it while cooking

I like adding the touch of vinegar to the chilli oil because it underscores the chilli heat - and the dish should have more chilli than garlic flavour

serve with french fries or rice

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The dinner went great but I was out dancing until 4am so I need to work up the energy to deal with posting up the pics. Have patience.

In the meantime, prasantrin asked me about my culinary influences. To be honest, I don't remember that clearly where I really started really getting into cooking. I think I started reading about cooking far before I actually had the chance or the equipment to accomplish many of the dishes. So when I got into the kitchen, I always had a whole bunch of things I wanted to try. I guess there's not really much more to say, I read a lot, I cook a lot and I'm always seeking to improve. I've never taken any culinary classes and I have no intention of doing it professionally but I have the type of personality where I take any hobby very very seriously.

In terms of style, my first and deepest love has always been French food. Something about the systematic and methodical way that the French try to classify and understand everything really suits my style of cooking which is to try and make sense of everything I'm doing. My scientific background really feeds into my cooking and I'm constantly trying a gain a sense of why I cook something that way. However, at the same time, I love improvising and pulling eclectic influences from every sort of cuisine to cobble something delicious together. Ever since I arrived in the US, I've started incorporating a lot of Southwest/Mexican/Caribbean flavors into my dishes. There's just something about that lime/cilantro/garlic flavour that I really love. I'm embarrased to say that I'm not really that good at cooking Chinese food. I can do a couple of basic things and a few home recipes but my parents always cooked the Chinese food so I very rarely would do any and I don't really have a sense of what it's all about. I'm slowly starting to expand my Indian repetoire as I start to gain an understanding of all the different spices used and I can fudge Southeast Asian with reasonable ease.

I have to admit though, to a wholly unreasoned prejudice against Italian food. Italian food, as food, I will be the first to admit, can taste really great and I cook it all the time. However, it's not a cuisine I generally love cooking. The entire philosophy of "find the best ingredients, treat them simply" makes for great food but boring cooking. I'm sure plenty of people are going to leap in and defend Italian food and that's fine, I'm not going to argue. I admit upfront it's a totally unreasoned prejudice but one I have.

PS: I am a guy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Maybe you glossed over it in my prior post, but could you tell me about Portuguese chicken and what distinguishes it from other varieties?

Nandos. I enjoyed the lemon/herb marinade. For those of us in North America, Nando's sauces used to be available here (they may still be, but my suppliers no longer carry them).

Shalmanse - What's the deal with pickled beets and fried eggs on burgers?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One other thing which I think is a bit unusual about me is that I would classify myself as someone who loves cooking but not so much as someone who loves eating. I've certainly met many people who appear to love eating far more than I do. Quite often, I've found myself spending 3 hours in the kitchen to cook some elaborate meal and then realise I've scarfed it down in half an hour while watching TV and completely forgot how it tasted.

I actually used to also be a fairly indiscriminate eater. Anything that was put in front of me, especially if it was free, I would typically enjoy. I remember that even after I became seriously interested in cooking, I was still indiscriminate in my eating and it was only by conscious effort that I started to raise the bar of what I would allow to pass through my mouth.

Insomnia and cooking were also good friends of mine during busy times in my life and cooking became a combination of a stress reliever and procrastination device for me. I became an expert in ultra silent cooking at 5am in the morning, trying not to wake anyone else up. I also specialised in ultra labour intensive, complicated, anal cooking at that time because it was a great way to soak up the time. After every time I made chicken stock, I would seperate all the meat from the carcasses over the span of 2 hours. while obsessively straining the stock through multiple layers of cheesecloth to ensure I had the most crystal clear clarity. It wasn't that I thought it was worth it but there was something about those repetitive activities that gave me focus and helped clear my head.

Another thing that seems a bit odd given my predilection for long menus is that I've realized that tasting menus utterly bore me. You sit around for 3 or 4 hours being served tiny bites of food and, somewhere around the middle, I just feel an urge to be able to dig into something rather than fuss around with all the precious presentation. Theres usually so much going on on the plate and the portions are so small that you feel like you have to take tiny bites with different permutations to maximise your dining experience. First you have to taste the meat alone, then with the sauce, then with the tiny microgreen salad dotting the plate, then all 3 in combination and then all 3 but with whatever assemble-your-own garnish is on the side. At no point do you actually get a full mouthful of anything and it always leaves the inner glutton in me vaguely unsatisfied at the end of the night. If any enterprising chef is reading, open a restaurant promoting taste & steak, 8 tiny courses of intricately prepared zen like masterpieces, a big ass ribeye with some french fries and then another 8 intricate courses of intricately prepared zen like masterpieces. I would make a booking in a flash.

PS: I am a guy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Shalmanse - What's the deal with pickled beets and fried eggs on burgers?

I have no idea about the beets, I've never actually tasted a pickled beet to the best of my knowledge. But fried eggs is such an obvious addition I'm surprised it even raises eyebrows. The key is to cook the egg on high heat until it's over easy. You get the crunch of the egg whites which plays off the soft texture of the meat and then you get the lovely gooey yolk which mixes in with the tomato/barbeque sauce and runs all over everything. Chefs have been topping everything under the sun with fried eggs, I would have thought burgers are one of the most obvious candidates for this treatment.

One other thing I want to add is that, while I was living with my parents, I was in charge of the cooking but my parents were largely in charge of the shopping and they ultimately had to pay the credit card bill so I was always a fairly resourceful cook. I would read recipes but I barely ever followed them because it took me a long time to even amass the basics of a western pantry and then even longer for other cuisines. Instead, I would take insipirations and influences and work them into whatever ingredients we had on hand.

This has always given me a rather improvisational edge to my cooking and I still hold onto that today. I very rarely plan things that far out in advance, even dinner parties and I enjoy wandering through the markets and letting the ingredients provide inspiration. I have fun making up dishes on the fly and I have to say it's been pretty rare that my intuition on what flavours would pair have ever gone horribly wrong.

As for why I love cooking western food so much, when I was growing up, we always ate Chinese food at home so western food was always this exotic thing that was for special occasions only. It always looked so interesting when I had it and there was always so many new things to try whereas it was always the same chinese dishes I had eaten over and over again. So when I could cook, I naturally wanted to cook all those western foods I had heard so much about but never got to taste. In the kitchen, it was a fairly natural delegation where I would cook western stuff and my parents would cook Chinese stuff. I learnt a few recipes from them but I tended to cook them only when I lacked inspiration for anything else since my parents could always make it far better than I could. However, there were some dishes that became part of me repertoire just because I loved them so much. Among them were steamed egg custard, stewed green beans with pork and potatoes, fried julienned potatoes with celery and pork, chicken & shiitake mushroom, pork & daikon soup, chicken & sweet corn soup and fried rice.

PS: I am a guy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Shalmanse - What's the deal with pickled beets and fried eggs on burgers?

I have no idea about the beets, I've never actually tasted a pickled beet to the best of my knowledge. But fried eggs is such an obvious addition I'm surprised it even raises eyebrows. The key is to cook the egg on high heat until it's over easy. You get the crunch of the egg whites which plays off the soft texture of the meat and then you get the lovely gooey yolk which mixes in with the tomato/barbeque sauce and runs all over everything. Chefs have been topping everything under the sun with fried eggs, I would have thought burgers are one of the most obvious candidates for this treatment.

I didn't say it was a bad addition, just that most of the places I visited in Australia (from Hungry Jacks to a stand at a market to the local pub I frequented) put beets, fried eggs and often sprouts on the burgers. They were standard toppings.

Eggs may be obvious candidates for topping, but I don't know of other countries that seem to have adopted them across the board. (But then, I haven't been to every country.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Finally, the dinner pics are up. Apologies for the inconsistent quality, a friend with a good camera and bad photography skills were taking the photos.

gallery_28660_4797_57739.jpg

Amuse Bouche of Sauteed Saffron Milk Cap Mushrooms with Scrambled Eggs: I've never tasted these mushrooms before so I thought I would play it safe and just fry them in some butter and top some eggs. This was actually a really nice dish, the mushrooms were nutty and meaty and the eggs were cooked french style super slow over low heat to form a creamy base.

gallery_28660_4797_165830.jpg

French Onion Soup: A classic and a pain to make. I realised why I never ever make this when I spent an hour finely slicing 5 pounds of onions only to see it reduce down to one cup. It was good though for such a cold night. Had to use balsamic vinegar instead of the traditionally sherry vinegar at the end and the bacon I was using was so lean I had a hard time rendering any fat out of it. If there's one thing America does well, it's smoke. Americans have a love affair with smoke which I don't think I've seen matched in any other cuisine. The bacon I got was "lightly smoked" as opposed to supermarket bacon which is completely non-smoked. It didn't compare at all to the american stuff.

gallery_28660_4797_147349.jpg

gallery_28660_4797_21294.jpg

Grilled Cumin Rubbed Lamb with a Borlotti, Corn & Avocado Salsa: The salsa was the standout hit for the night, everyone thought it was delicious. It's an old standby recipe I have that usually uses black beans but I couldn't find canned black beans in Australia, just another reminder of how little mexican cuisine has penetrated Australia. The recipe is just canned beans, frozen corn, avocado, lime, olive oil, sugar, salt, pepper, cumin, finely diced chilli and cilantro. The lamb was also amazing, well flavoured and super tender. It seems that what this company means by "scotch fillet" is a piece of lamb tenderloin attached to a long thin rib muscle that reminds me of flank steak. I had to buy powdered cumin since my spice grinder is still in Seattle and the cumin was more subtle than I expected.

gallery_28660_4797_70376.jpg

Roasted Red Bell Pepper & Cherry Tomato Pasta: As I've done more of these things, I realise the biggest pain is plating so I just had people serve themselves using their lamb dish so that explains the mess on the side of the bowl. This is another old standby dish and I can't remember where I got the concept from. You halve cherry tomatos and put them in a screamingly hot, oiled cast iron pan. the heat from the pan chars the bottom of the tomato and then you use a fork to mash them all up. Added in some red peppers I roasted, chopped and then pureeded very gently as well as some basil and it was done. Theres a nice contrast in textures between the well cooked bottom of the tomato and the still uncooked tops and the flavours are bright and simple.

gallery_28660_4797_83328.jpg

Sheppard's Pie: Made with 100% free range Sheppards :biggrin:. I didn't realise how much of an evil influence Ling has had on me in Seattle until I tried to put in more than 2 tbsp of butter into the mashed potatoes and some dinner guests started complaining. I ended up making 1/4 "healthy" mashed potatoes with barely any butter and the rest with an entire stick of butter. In the filling was lamb, onions, leeks, carrots, celery, capsicum (red bell pepper for non-Australians) and mushrooms. I didn't have any tomato paste on hand so the taste was different from what I was used to but still good.

gallery_28660_4797_195766.jpg

Roy Des Valles Cheese with Muscatel Grapes and Sourdough Bread: Muscatel are a type of grape I've only seen in Australia and I love them. They have a very sweet, winey flavour to them. They go especially well with cheese so I tend to throw a few onto every cheese course I serve. The bread is from my favourite baker in Australia who I showed in my farmers market pics. The cheese is a big ole stinky sheeps milk cheese which is what I love.

gallery_28660_4797_277113.jpg

Lychees & Passionfruit in a Lemongrass Syrup: This was a completely impromptu dessert which I probably need to work a bit more on the presentation of. I saw some cheap lychees, cheap passionfruit and some lemongrass which looked interesting. The idea for the dessert only really gelled when I got home. I simmered the lemongrass in a raw sugar simple syrup and then added some lime to balance the sweetness. Let the passionfruit and lychees steep for 3 hours and then served. It was really, really delicious. The flavours all complimented each other really well.

gallery_28660_4797_17927.jpg

Rhubarb Clafouti: If there was one dud tonight, it was this one. I saw rhubarb at the market and I was thinking of different desserts and realised I had never made Clafouti before. It was impossible to taste the dish before it was cooked so there wasn't enough sugar and too much flour in the dough. I also threw in some currants soaked in the lemongrass syrup into the mix but I probably should have added more currants because the ones that were there didn't feel integrated into the dish. It was still a decent dish that everyone loved but not one I was proud of.

Phew, so I guess I'm only 1 day behind now. The paradox of food blogging seems to be that the result of having lots of stuff to show people is you end up not having enough time to actually show them. I didn't realise how time intensive this thing would be.

PS: I am a guy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Shalmanse - What's the deal with pickled beets and fried eggs on burgers?

I have no idea about the beets, I've never actually tasted a pickled beet to the best of my knowledge. But fried eggs is such an obvious addition I'm surprised it even raises eyebrows. The key is to cook the egg on high heat until it's over easy. You get the crunch of the egg whites which plays off the soft texture of the meat and then you get the lovely gooey yolk which mixes in with the tomato/barbeque sauce and runs all over everything. Chefs have been topping everything under the sun with fried eggs, I would have thought burgers are one of the most obvious candidates for this treatment.

I didn't say it was a bad addition, just that most of the places I visited in Australia (from Hungry Jacks to a stand at a market to the local pub I frequented) put beets, fried eggs and often sprouts on the burgers. They were standard toppings.

Eggs may be obvious candidates for topping, but I don't know of other countries that seem to have adopted them across the board. (But then, I haven't been to every country.)

Eggs on top of burgers are really popular at fast food joints in Japan. I've seen them also on menus at fast food places in the USA (fatburger, I think).

Eating pizza with a fork and knife is like making love through an interpreter.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

gallery_28660_4797_277113.jpg

Lychees & Passionfruit in a Lemongrass Syrup: This was a completely impromptu dessert which I probably need to work a bit more on the presentation of. I saw some cheap lychees, cheap passionfruit and some lemongrass which looked interesting. The idea for the dessert only really gelled when I got home. I simmered the lemongrass in a raw sugar simple syrup and then added some lime to balance the sweetness. Let the passionfruit and lychees steep for 3 hours and then served. It was really, really delicious. The flavours all complimented each other really well.

This looks like a great dessert. You can make it more like a Chinese-style dessert if you used less sugar and added some tapioca pearls (the small kind) and short-grain glutinous rice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

gallery_28660_4797_277113.jpg

Lychees & Passionfruit in a Lemongrass Syrup: This was a completely impromptu dessert which I probably need to work a bit more on the presentation of. I saw some cheap lychees, cheap passionfruit and some lemongrass which looked interesting. The idea for the dessert only really gelled when I got home. I simmered the lemongrass in a raw sugar simple syrup and then added some lime to balance the sweetness. Let the passionfruit and lychees steep for 3 hours and then served. It was really, really delicious. The flavours all complimented each other really well.

I love those flavors, and that's going on next Halloween's menu. Just like that.

Eyeballs and babyeyeballs. or eyeballs and tadpoles.

"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have to say I just love your blogs. The endless parade of fine looking food. Thanks for taking the time out to show us. You said you had not tried one of the Bay Bugs. I have been told they are amazing. Another friend said they were like eating iodine and the taste was very strong. Could you try for us and report back?

I hope we are all around to see your efforts of 50 on your 50th!

I have thrown some large multicourse bashes in my day, how many days does it take to clean up and restore order in your kitchen after one of these events?

**************************************************

Ah, it's been way too long since I did a butt. - Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

--------------------

One summers evening drunk to hell, I sat there nearly lifeless…Warren

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Apologies for not being prompt in my postings. Lets get you all up to speed.

After a heavy night out drinking and dancing, I stayed over at a friend's place and we woke up the next morning and went to a noodle joint close by. She got the mongolian lamb, I got a Roast Duck Noodle Soup:

gallery_28660_4797_102986.jpg

The soup was just what I needed to revive me.

Unfortunately, my mother was working that night so I didn't get to show you some of her chinese cooking. Instead, I just improvised a bit with some leftovers.

gallery_28660_4797_76903.jpg

The Roast Bell Pepper/Cherry Pasta with some Mustard Crusted Lamb Chops. Man, these lamb chops were amazing. Excellent flavour and super tender.

gallery_28660_4797_67911.jpg

French Onion Soup with the Roy Des Valles Cheese. This cheese wasn't as good melted as it was raw. Oh well.

gallery_28660_4797_31340.jpg

This was a midnight snack. The yellow thing on top is chinese steamed egg custard. You mix eggs, salt and sesame oil together well and then add about an equal part of water. Then you place it in the steamer tray of your rice cooker and it cooks while the rice is cooking. Drizzle some soy sauce over the top to finish. I didn't put enough water in this one and it was too firm. It's meant to be soft and delicate. I deglazed the pan used to cook the lamb chops with some beef stock and made lamb rice to go with it.

I also had some left over shepherd's pie filling with the lamb rice and it was delicious but too ugly to take a photo of :(.

Last night, Dad came home from Hong Kong so this was the first time the family was together in almost a year. I made a special dinner to celebrate:

gallery_28660_4797_55885.jpg

Lettuce, Cherry Tomato & Smoked Ocean Trout Salad. I'd seen this ocean trout at the farmers market for a few years and I loved how it tasted but I'd never bought it because it was so expensive. I finally bought a piece this week and I thought I would showcase it in this recipe. It was pretty damn good.

gallery_28660_4797_82721.jpg

Five Spice Rubbed Lamb Chops with Asian Greens in Oyster Sauce. I forget what sort of green this was. My mother showed me a different way of cooking them. Normally, I stir fry the greens and then add oyster sauce to the pan. Instead, she blanched the greens and then fried the oyster sauce seperately and poured it over the top. It was much more delicate and light but more work IMO.

gallery_28660_4797_22314.jpg

Lamb Shank & Herb Butter with Pumpkin, Leek & Saffron Milk Cap Mushroom. This was a new way of making lamb shanks I got just the day before from a Jamie Oliver cookbook my friend had lying around. You put some veggies down the bottom, put the lamb shank on top and then wrap the entire thing in aluminium foil and park it in the oven. The vegetables flavour the meat and the meat flavours the vegetables. I cut a pocket in each lamb shank and added in a mix of butter, oregano, basil, garlic, mustard and lemon zest. I wish I had anchovies here but I didn't. These are super simple to make although they take a bit longer than braised lamb shanks so you have to account for that when you cook them. There was a thick layer of fat when you open it up, I don't know a good way of dealing with that. If I were to do it again, I would have cut some slits in the silverskin, browned the entire thing before stuffing, added more stuffing slits and let it cook for a bit longer. Still, it was a pretty cool way of doing lamb shanks that I had never seen before.

This afternoon, my mum made some fresh hand rolled noodles with a chinese saurkraut sauce. The northern Chinese and the Germans seemed to have discovered saurkraut (suan cai) completely independantly but they both make them in almost exactly the same way. People where I come from are obsessed with this saurkraut and it used to be every person had a pickling barrel at home just for this. You pack finely sliced cabbage and salt together and let natural yeasts and bacteria get in to form the starter. Then, on every batch, you leave the old sour mix in the barrel and it ages and develops. People have had the same starter for many tens of years and when you go back, everybody's pickle barrel has a different taste. Sadly, I think the government had health concerns about home pickling so this practise is dying down and people are buying their saurkraut from stores. If you're ever in that area of China, order some saurkraut with fatty pork and rice noodles. It's a fantastic dish.

Tonight, I'm hopefully going to be cooking at a friend's house. I think this is either the last or second last day of my foodblog so I'll try and get those damn market shots up like I promised so many people.

PS: I am a guy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Your Lamb with cumin looks lovely. I so wanted to buy lamb today but all they had were some really crappy looking rib chops. Good lamb is really hard to find around here.

You're telling me! Trader Joe's has some New Zealand lamb that is good in a pinch if you want something decent but it's a market forces thing. Americans want their meats tender and without "gamy" flavours. Corn fed beef tastes like chewy water and your lamb tastes more like veal than lamb. But if that's what the consumers are demanding, then that's what will be provided.

I have to say I just love your blogs. The endless parade of fine looking food. Thanks for taking the time out to show us. You said you had not tried one of the Bay Bugs. I have been told they are amazing. Another friend said they were like eating iodine and the taste was very strong. Could you try for us and report back?

I hope we are all around to see your efforts of 50 on your 50th!

I have thrown some large multicourse bashes in my day, how many days does it take to clean up and restore order in your kitchen after one of these events?

Morton Bay Bugs are a delicacy here, sort of like lobster. If I find a place that serves it, I'll order some but it's not something you see everyday around here.

Generally, the kitchen isn't too much of a mess after each party. Everyone pitches in and the entire thing can be clean in under an hour.

PS: I am a guy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This afternoon, my mum made some fresh hand rolled noodles with a chinese saurkraut sauce. The northern Chinese and the Germans seemed to have discovered saurkraut (suan cai) completely independantly but they both make them in almost exactly the same way. People where I come from are obsessed with this saurkraut and it used to be every person had a pickling barrel at home just for this. You pack finely sliced cabbage and salt together and let natural yeasts and bacteria get in to form the starter. Then, on every batch, you leave the old sour mix in the barrel and it ages and develops. People have had the same starter for many tens of years and when you go back, everybody's pickle barrel has a different taste. Sadly, I think the government had health concerns about home pickling so this practise is dying down and people are buying their saurkraut from stores. If you're ever in that area of China, order some saurkraut with fatty pork and rice noodles. It's a fantastic dish.

As a confirmed sauerkraut fan, I'd love to know more about Chinese sauerkraut. Is it made with what we Anglos call Chinese cabbage/napa, or some other type? Could I buy it by the jar in my local Asian grocery here in the States? Just did a quick Google search, and didn't find much info, so anything you have time to tell me would be most welcome. :smile:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As a confirmed sauerkraut fan, I'd love to know more about Chinese sauerkraut. Is it made with what we Anglos call Chinese cabbage/napa, or some other type? Could I buy it by the jar in my local Asian grocery here in the States? Just did a quick Google search, and didn't find much info, so anything you have time to tell me would be most welcome. :smile:

Google for Suan Cai. Northeastern chinese food is not popular in the west so I doubt you could find any traditional Suan Cai very easily but it's very easy to make your own. My parents used to do it all the time until they discovered Saurkraut at a german grocery store and started buying that instead. As far as I'm aware, every time I've eaten it, it's been made from normal cabbage but the wikipedia entry says it's normally made from Napa cabbage.

We just had some tonight in traditional chinese jiao ze (dumplings).

Sheena: this blog seems to have quite a bit on chinese pickles.

PS: I am a guy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I didn't say it was a bad addition, just that most of the places I visited in Australia (from Hungry Jacks to a stand at a market to the local pub I frequented) put beets, fried eggs and often sprouts on the burgers.  They were standard toppings. 

Eggs may be obvious candidates for topping, but I don't know of other countries that seem to have adopted them across the board. (But then, I haven't been to every country.)

Pam, it really is just one of those things. I don't think anyone knows where it started, but I will have a poke around if you like.

The beetroot is always pickled and tinned. Another popular addition is tinned pineapple, I am surprised you didn't get that. Apparently we are the only country in the world that eats the majority of our beetroot pickled.

I'm not sure what you mean by sprouts, but I can't think of any that are standard.

ETA link

The pineapple and beetroot are standard. If you do not say "No beetroot or pineapple", you will certainly get them. The egg normally is requested as it is included in "with the lot", so is bacon.

Edited by Syrah (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Maybe you glossed over it in my prior post, but could you tell me about Portuguese chicken and what distinguishes it from other varieties?

Nandos. I enjoyed the lemon/herb marinade. For those of us in North America, Nando's sauces used to be available here (they may still be, but my suppliers no longer carry them).

Nando's Web site suggests that their sauces are slowly spreading eastward across the US from the West Coast. The company has restaurants in Canada (mostly western Canada).

A quick search on "peri peri" using the Sauce-O-Matic at Peppers, the compleat hot sauce emporium in Rehoboth Beach, Delaware, turned up 10 sauces with peri peri peppers in them, including six peri peri sauces (African Rhino, from Florida, and Zulu Zulu, from Georgia -- three each), but no Nandos.

gallery_28660_4797_83328.jpg

Sheppard's Pie: Made with 100% free range Sheppards :biggrin:. I didn't realise how much of an evil influence Ling has had on me in Seattle until I tried to put in more than 2 tbsp of butter into the mashed potatoes and some dinner guests started complaining. I ended up making 1/4 "healthy" mashed potatoes with barely any butter and the rest with an entire stick of butter.

I'm of two minds about the whole "healthy" thing. On the one hand, life's too short to deny oneself true experiences, so I tend to prefer the genuine article over the better-for-you version. On the other hand, I could use fewer pounds on my frame. But watching total calorie intake and exercising IMO are better than cutting entire categories of foods out of your diet for weight loss' sake.

This duality sometimes expresses itself in the form of things like making mashed potatoes with 1/2 stick of butter and the water in which the potatoes were boiled. Half a loaf that's better than none? Maybe. Maybe not.

Wonderful dishes so far, and I enjoyed the personal history too.

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...