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bleudauvergne

Liquorice in France

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Coming across this bag of twigs hanging with the candy treats in a neighborhood sundries shop the other day I asked Loic if he had ever gnawed on them as a child. 'But of course! That is licorice!' Um, ok.

Does anyone have fond childhood French memories of this 'delicious treat'? I found chewing into it unpalatable. I felt that licking it just to kind of taste the flavor was kind of nice but would never have amounted to a "secret d'enfance" unless maybe this is some remnant of a time when sugar was rationed and no candy or sweets were available.

Liquorice is really strong over here in Europe, that's for sure. Loic came back from Italy with a gift for me, assuming with proper married logic that because he loves liquorice I do too, never questioning that I would have a die hard love of hard liquorice flavor. These pastilles were just completely over the top and I have a hard time with just one. They will last years, I'm sure. Perhaps this is one of those things like cinnamon flavored candies being unpalatable to many French?

Should I wash the sticks?


Edited by bleudauvergne (log)

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I can laugh in recognition because I, too, am surprised at how popular and beloved licorice is as a flavor in France (and Holland, too, if Chufi is to be believed). I first encountered it unexpectedly in a package of Mentos I bought, because I didn't recognize the French word for licorice (reglisse). Ptui!!! Yuck!!! What is that horrible taste??? It took me a while to identify because I never eat it here.

Than I found out that many liquid medicines (such as cough syrup) are flavored with liquorice in France, just as we flavor them with cherry in the United States... :blink:


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The twigs you are referring to we, the Dutch, call zoethout (sweet wood) and they certainly bring back memories; of those wonderful candy stores where you could buy these and other goodies for a nickel. We chewed them in abundance in my youth, although after a while the strands of soggy wood would become a bit distasteful. Later in life they were quite helpful in kicking the smoking habit. Never heard of anyone washing them.

Now, having emigrated to the UK, "real" liquorice is what I miss most (that and real Dutch farmer's cheese and Indonesian food). When visiting, friends always bring along bags of liquorice and those never last more than a few days. Unfortunately French liquorice is just not the real thing. On the other hand, the thought of the Dutch Jamin shops with 20 or so different kinds, is mouthwatering. Ah, liquorice!

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Marianne have you seen this site:

liquorice heaven webshop, they are based in the UK and sell a pretty vast range of liquorice products.

I often make a tea with liquroice root to soothe coughs - I really like the flavour of liquorice root and get quite upset when candy is sold as liquorice but just tastes of aniseed.

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Marianne have you seen this site:

liquorice heaven webshop,

I have now, even ordered some. Thanks to you my day just started off sunny, despite the local overcast.

(By the way, perhaps you would like to try the sweet wood tea with a hint of fennel, quite nice)

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Oddly enough, when my doctor found out that I was using liquorice pastiles to soothe a cough brought on by a combination of meds, she gave me hell because "Liquorice will rasie your blood pressure!" Who knew? :shock:


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Oddly enough, when my doctor found out that I was using liquorice pastiles to soothe a cough brought on by a combination of meds, she gave me hell because "Liquorice will rasie your blood pressure!" Who knew? :shock:

Every once in a while they get on a kick of listing weird food and drug interactions. Liquorice is a big one and grapefruit too.

but I only like fake Red liquorice anyway

tracey


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I was in Paris, buying olive oil at some lovely shop just around the corner from Rue Cler, le Patron noticed my daughter with me and threw in a couple of liquorice sticks for her. She was unimpressed. So was I.

I was in Courchevel, eating at a Michelin 2-star, and one of the desserts featured wedges of pear skewered on a liquorish stick, which was, in turn, standing straight up, anchored in a poached pear swimming in some sort of lime foam. I was told to chew the stick, then eat the pears. I was impressed.


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Maybe context does have something to do with it, then. :smile:

This morning while doing a little straightening up I found a chewed stick on the coffee table. Apparently someone quite enjoyed it. :biggrin:

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The twigs you are referring to we, the Dutch, call zoethout (sweet wood) and they certainly bring back memories; of those wonderful candy stores where you could buy these and other goodies for a nickel. We chewed them in abundance in my youth, although after a while the strands of soggy wood would become a bit distasteful. Later in life they were quite helpful in kicking the smoking habit. Never heard of anyone washing them.

Now, having emigrated to the UK, "real" liquorice is what I miss most (that and real Dutch farmer's cheese and Indonesian food). When visiting, friends always bring along bags of liquorice and those never last more than a few days. Unfortunately French liquorice is just not the real thing. On the other hand, the thought of the Dutch Jamin shops with 20 or so different kinds, is mouthwatering.  Ah, liquorice!

Sometime last year, I encountered Dutch salt licorice. The medium salt version. Much spitting, hacking, and rinsing of mouth(s) ensued. What is it with that stuff, anyway?

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