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Chocolate souffle photography


origamicrane
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Hi all

I am trying to do a photo shoot of a chocolate souffle.

The problem is that by the time I get the souffle out of the oven, demoulded it, sprinkled icing sugar on and placed it in the right position for the shot it has already started to deflate.

Does anyone know if there is a way to stablise the souffle so that it will not deflate (or not so quickly)?

it doesn't matter if the souffle is not edible as i'm only after the shot.

I'm thinking of just increasing the amount of corn flour in the souffle but not sure if it will effect the amount it rises?

will be grateful for any tips

thanks

"so tell me how do you bone a chicken?"

"tastes so good makes you want to slap your mamma!!"

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I don't have any tips for stabilizing the souffles, but what I do is, set up the shoot while they are baking, using a stand-in of some kind for the souffle so I can get the exposure and lighting the way I want. Then, when the souffles are ready, I can take them out, swap out the dummy, and immediately and get the shot I want before they deflate.

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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why are you unmolding the souffle? is this sort of a molten lava cake as opposed to a true souffle? i think half the drama of a souffle is the amount it rises above the ramekin...would this work for you or does it interfere with the way you're plating the dessert as a whole?

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Clement came up with an interesting experiment on his blog. You might want to try it!

http://www.alacuisine.org/alacuisine/2005/...late_sous_.html

Mark

The Gastronomer's Bookshelf - Collaborative book reviews about food and food culture. Submit a review today! :)

No Special Effects - my reader-friendly blog about food and life.

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why are you unmolding the souffle?  is this sort of a molten lava cake as opposed to a true souffle?  i think half the drama of a souffle is the amount it rises above the ramekin...would this work for you or does it interfere with the way you're plating the dessert as a whole?

bingo!

yep its the molten lava cake kind.

I want a shot where i can see the chocolate ozzing out.

just wondering if there is some ingredient that can be added to actually set the souffle once it has risen.

"so tell me how do you bone a chicken?"

"tastes so good makes you want to slap your mamma!!"

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I'd argue for keeping it real. yes, photographing food can be a bit tedious with all the details... but what's the point if you're just faking it (adding stabilizers and such)?

Sorry- not exactly what you asked for.

flavor floozy

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but what's the point if you're just faking it (adding stabilizers and such)?

I'm not a professional food photographer, but I think the answer to your question is the same answer to what's the point of being a food photographer! :biggrin:

Mark

The Gastronomer's Bookshelf - Collaborative book reviews about food and food culture. Submit a review today! :)

No Special Effects - my reader-friendly blog about food and life.

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Build a lightbox with heaters blowing into it to keep the temp up and you should get a few more seconds at least. As long as the camera body stays outside you should be able to steer clear of fogged film (or increased sensor noise if you're shooting digital).

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I'd argue for keeping it real.  yes, photographing food can be a bit tedious with all the details... but what's the point if you're just faking it (adding stabilizers and such)?

Sorry- not exactly what you asked for.

arrr...

I'm trying to capture that delicious moment then the souffle is at it peak of culinary perfection, before it collapses into a deflated lump :smile:

In the same way that if I ordered it in a restaurant and the souffle was served collapsed I think I would send it back.

"so tell me how do you bone a chicken?"

"tastes so good makes you want to slap your mamma!!"

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Harold McGee mentions that adding flour to the batter will stabilize it. The gluten network, he says, will form around the foam, so when the foam collapses, the souffle still stands. I don't think you'll be able to avoid a little bit of collapse, though, particularly if you're leaving an uncooked center. And adding flour will probably make it look (and taste) different, too. I dunno...there's probably something industrial that'll do it. Good luck!

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I think your best bet would be, to make a few, keep them warm in the oven to use as/when you need them. Get everything set up and have someone bring in the Souffle and split it immediately, ready for you to photograph.

Something like Souffle is not a one-person job.

Please take a quick look at my stuff.

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