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docsconz

Fancy Food Show July 8-10 2007

34 posts in this topic

I am hoping to attend this year's Fancy Food Show at the Javits Center in July.

Since this will be my first experience there and the volume of the show appears daunting, I would love to see what tips, tricks and strategies eGullet Society members have used and recommend for getting the most out of the show. Here, here, here, here

here and here are topics on previous years' shows.

I am particularly interested to know which eGullet Society members may be exhibiting, what they will be exhibiting and where they will be.


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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Hey Doc

Mayhawman (Brooks) is usually there as am I, but he is actually working :blink:

My advice....

good shoes, loose pants, no rings.

Think before you put that in your mouth if it doesnt really sound good it might not be.

If you have any sodium issues be even more carefull/ and drink lots of water at the aisle ends

Now the fun part, this thing is freeking amazing the Entire Javits Center filled with food and its all yours

They set up rows of States downstairs and Countries upstairs, I usually start downs stairs to the right just for the hell of it ( and there used to be waffles over there)

They offer clear plastic shopping bags for your Literature, if you are careful you can tuck samples in there Officially no samples to be removed, no cameras either. You dont want to carry anything into the show.

I may be on my own this year on the Sunday if anyone wants to meet-up.

tracey


The great thing about barbeque is that when you get hungry 3 hours later....you can lick your fingers

Maxine

Avoid cutting yourself while slicing vegetables by getting someone else to hold them while you chop away.

"It is the government's fault, they've eaten everything."

My Webpage

garden state motorcyle association

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How many days can you attend? That'll make a big difference in the answer. (I go every year.)


Overheard at the Zabar’s prepared food counter in the 1970’s:

Woman (noticing a large bowl of cut fruit): “How much is the fruit salad?”

Counterman: “Three-ninety-eight a pound.”

Woman (incredulous, and loud): “THREE-NINETY EIGHT A POUND ????”

Counterman: “Who’s going to sit and cut fruit all day, lady… YOU?”

Newly updated: my online food photo extravaganza; cook-in/eat-out and photos from the 70's

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Here are some additional tips:

1. Preregister. Otherwise, you will be waiting on long lines at the registration booth. You can register on the show's web site, here.

2. If you go on Sunday, it will be very crowded. Even though the show is supposedly open to the trade only, the trade can register "guests." Sunday in NY.... free food. If they're not at Zabars or the Hamptons, they're at the show. Sharpen your elbows.

3. The above web site includes links to floor plans and lists of exhibitors. Each exhibit booth is numbered. If you know in advance that you want to visit specific vendors, you can find their locations on the floor plans. Plan this out now so that when you arrive, you'll have specific destinations.

4. A printed guide will be available near the registration area. It contains the exhibitors and floor plans. Browse through it to get a sense of who is located where. It also cross references vendors by product type.

5. As noted by rooftop1000, the international pavilions are on the first level. So are the large wholesale distributors. The lower level is divided into regions or States. Because of my interest in regional products, I have always enjoyed the lower level where the exhibitors tend to be made up of smaller and/or newer companies.

6. Both floors have many independent vendors who are not part of larger categories. There is no rhyme or reason to their location. So the charcuterie purveyor will be next to the chocolatier who is next to the soy smoothie or gummi candy vendor.

7. Do not eat a large breakfast and don't plan on lunch. You will spend the day tasting dozens of items in random order, as noted in #6.

8. I agree with Markk; number of days attending will make a difference. I've done it in one day, traveling r/t from Albany. Exhausting and not recommended.

9. Most of all, enjoy. It's an awesome experience.


Ilene

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How many days can you attend?  That'll make a big difference in the answer.  (I go every year.)

I will probably be able to do a day and a half - most likely Sunday and part of Monday.

Beanie, thanks for your thoughtful recommendations. Are there any specific producers that you consider "must" visits?


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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How many days can you attend?  That'll make a big difference in the answer.  (I go every year.)

I will probably be able to do a day and a half - most likely Sunday and part of Monday.

You can probably see a great portion of the show in that time.

As to your question about what producers to see (though it wasn't directed at me), I'd suggest that you lose a lot of time if you try to pick them out and go from one to the other. I think a better way is to start at one end and work your way through, and I think that you can accomplish a lot in a day and a half, and finding things in strange juxtaposition is quite interesting.

Aside from Beanie's excellent suggestions, here's my take:

I like to start in the North East hall - where you'll see the banners that say "Italy", but that may be because I can eat my body weight in prosciutto and Parmiggiano-Reggiano. I work my way back to the main entrance, and then I do the north-west part of the hall, where I find lots of interesting things. Except for the fact that D'Artagnan is sometimes in the South Hall (south-west corner last year), I don't have great luck in that hall. I do a fast walk through, and then head downstairs, where the booths are smaller, as a rule, and very intresting as well.

Of course, I'm not a candy or chocolate or dessert person, so I usually bypass those booths, and if I have spotted one that I must try, I try to end up there at the end of the day.


Edited by markk (log)

Overheard at the Zabar’s prepared food counter in the 1970’s:

Woman (noticing a large bowl of cut fruit): “How much is the fruit salad?”

Counterman: “Three-ninety-eight a pound.”

Woman (incredulous, and loud): “THREE-NINETY EIGHT A POUND ????”

Counterman: “Who’s going to sit and cut fruit all day, lady… YOU?”

Newly updated: my online food photo extravaganza; cook-in/eat-out and photos from the 70's

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There's an introduction to the show on the podcast on this link. It's geared toward the trade.

I agree with Mark about starting on one end and working your way through. Even when I've planned out an "itinerary," I've found myself wandering up and down aisles, just checking out the exhibits that interested me. One thing that I've enjoyed is the Focused Tastings, located usually at the rear of the lower floor (I think). Each year they pick a few categories of foods to feature, such as salsa, olive oil, etc., and offer tastings of several dozen products in the category.

Also, to clarify my previous post, I referred to the "first level" where many of the international pavilions are located. This is actually Level 3 -- the main exhibit floor that Mark refers to. Level 1 is downstairs, and international vendors are located there, too.


Ilene

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If you can go all 3 days, go for all 3 days. The NASFT show is alot of fun for foodies. Sunday is when all the vendors expect the non-professionals to attend to sample food. Monday & Tuesday is when business deals are made. If you have time, go Tuesday and linger until they're about to close. That's when you score big at the booths. Depending on the vendor, they'll just give stuff away to anyone because they don't want to lug it back home. Wear comfortable shoes & clothes but try to be a step above casual. Vendors respond better if you don't look sloppy.

Just my thoughts...


Edited by Gastro888 (log)

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If you can go all 3 days, go for all 3 days.  The NASFT show is alot of fun for foodies.  Sunday is when all the vendors expect the non-professionals to attend to sample food.  Monday & Tuesday is when business deals are made.  If you have time, go Tuesday and linger until they're about to close.  That's when you score big at the booths.  Depending on the vendor, they'll just give stuff away to anyone because they don't want to lug it back home.  Wear comfortable shoes & clothes but try to be a step above casual.  Vendors respond better if you don't look sloppy.

Just my thoughts...

When you say "non-professionals", are you implying that there is a way for people not in the trade to attend this show? If so, give us Eg-ers a heads-up!

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If you can go all 3 days, go for all 3 days.  The NASFT show is alot of fun for foodies.  Sunday is when all the vendors expect the non-professionals to attend to sample food.  Monday & Tuesday is when business deals are made.  If you have time, go Tuesday and linger until they're about to close.  That's when you score big at the booths.  Depending on the vendor, they'll just give stuff away to anyone because they don't want to lug it back home.  Wear comfortable shoes & clothes but try to be a step above casual.  Vendors respond better if you don't look sloppy.

Just my thoughts...

When you say "non-professionals", are you implying that there is a way for people not in the trade to attend this show? If so, give us Eg-ers a heads-up!

Certain nefarious individuals have been know to register a sham business in order to get into the show...

I don't know anyone like that, nope, not a one....

:cool:

this year, I'm press... whoa, free pass :cool:


does this come in pork?

My name's Emma Feigenbaum.

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If you can go all 3 days, go for all 3 days.  The NASFT show is alot of fun for foodies.  Sunday is when all the vendors expect the non-professionals to attend to sample food.  Monday & Tuesday is when business deals are made.  If you have time, go Tuesday and linger until they're about to close.  That's when you score big at the booths.  Depending on the vendor, they'll just give stuff away to anyone because they don't want to lug it back home.  Wear comfortable shoes & clothes but try to be a step above casual.  Vendors respond better if you don't look sloppy.

Just my thoughts...

When you say "non-professionals", are you implying that there is a way for people not in the trade to attend this show? If so, give us Eg-ers a heads-up!

People get in through various means - friends of people exhibiting/attending the show, registering online early (when they don't check creds), etc. You can get in, but I don't know the other ways besides those two.

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Just a reminder, tomorrow (Friday July 6) is the last day to pre-register at $35. It'll be $60 and a lot more hassle at the door.

I think I'll be there on Sunday, possibly Monday. Should be fun!

---Guy

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Does anyone know if they check photo id at the entrance to the show if you already have a badge?

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If you already have a badge, there is no photo ID check at the door.

---Guy

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If anyone comes across any especially interesting characters or stories or trends at the show which would work for a feature story, please let me know. Thanks. I'll be there but it seems so huge I could use help from extra pairs of eyes (and mouths).


Edited by LilianNY (log)

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So what did everyone think of the Fancy Food show?

My take -- not too much new under the sun. Hybiscus is big this year as are Goji berries.

Take your minted water please. When I'm thirsty I want a drink not mouthwash.

I love all the cheese and the olives.

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So what did everyone think of the Fancy Food show?

My take -- not too much new under the sun. Hybiscus is big this year as are Goji berries.

Take your minted water please.  When I'm thirsty I want a drink not mouthwash.

I love all the cheese and the olives.

Not all minted waters (or other products were created equally) :wink: I thought the show was a load of fun. I'm working on a report that I hope to have ready soon.


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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I'd love to hear more about the show and what people thought of it this year. If you're not hard-core in the food business, would it still be a cool trip to take (i.e. next year for me)????

Please tell.


---------------------------------------------------------

"If you don't want to use butter, add cream."

Julia Child

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I'd love to hear more about the show and what people thought of it this year.  If you're not hard-core in the food business, would it still be a cool trip to take (i.e. next year for me)????

Please tell.

I had a blast. To borrow a cliche, it was like being a kid in a candy store, except that one actually got to taste most things.


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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The show was a good show as always. I tried so many wonderful things. I loved the Twelve bubbly tea beverage, the truffle pizza from Divine Pasta, HiBall energy drink, and pretty much any salumi I could eat.

My favorite was that I was able to sample some Indian mangoes. Unfortunately, I found out that they're more hype than anything else.

eta: Some people get in the shows by working for the exhibitors. Wages range from $10/hour to $150 a day. Local culinary schools will have postings for these positions.

I liked the pop rice crackers they had in the Korea area. I've had them before but it was a treat to eat them super fresh. There's not a whole lot to dislike at the FF Show. I mean, hello, it's a food show.


Edited by Gastro888 (log)

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I think the one in Jan'08 will be in San Diego ! Whoo hoo ! I am SO there..............

Love to hear more, please !

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The Jan 2008 one will be in San Diego. Try to get in and work the show, especially on the last day when exhibitors give away their goodies. One show last year, I went home with some truffle oil.

The FF show is a great event for foodies but I do want to advise people to be polite. Not that egulleters need that reminder but believe you me, some people were at the show with no home training at all. Ugh. I know you guys won't hararss the vendors, demand outrageous samples, and will say "Please" and "Thank you".

Selma's is a baked goods company that makes awesome marshmallow-Rice Krispies treats that are far better than anything I have had to date. Not overly sweet, no artifical taste, and a "clean" finish (if there is such a thing with this type of food).

I gorged on pasta at the show. (Normally I don't eat much pasta because I have to watch my weight) Using premium pasta makes a huge difference. The sauce does cling to the pasta better and you get this wonderful toothsomeness to it. So does cooking it properly. The Italian-American companies cooked their pasta past al dente while te European companies hit it on the mark. I'll try and find the name of this one company that makes bronze die cut pasta.


Edited by Gastro888 (log)

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  The Italian-American companies cooked their pasta past al dente while te European companies hit it on the mark. 

I'm curious what you mean about on the mark vs al dente--I haven't been to Italy so don't know what the true Italian way is--I cook pasta until there is just the slightest bit of bite to it--what do they do in Italy? Inquiring minds want to know!

Zoe

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What a fun day. Everything from the familiar to the exotic. More salumi and cheese and olives than I could imagine. Duck breast from D'Artagnian, Gelati from Ciao Bella, Blue cheese and port, very considerste to put the booths next to each other, peri peri from Africa, even the Harry Potter Jelly beans(my son, " That tasted like fart). The serrano ham was a treat and my favorite was the balsamic tasting. Not often you get to try an 80 year old vinegar. Five hours flew by. A foodie's wet dream.

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