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I'm a noob transplanted southerner........


nonblonde007
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I have lived nearly all my life in the far north, Wa. and Alaska. Just moved to Arkansas last fall, and loving it! Soooo much to learn and experience. On the upside, the food here is sinfully delicious! Everything is deep fried, seasoned and bacon-greased to perfection. I will have to definately exercise more! I've been introduced to fried pickles???? frog legs, fried corn, fried okra and green tomtoes,(Yum!) catfish...who knew it could be so good, what we got up there tasted like dirt! Oh, and not to forget Crawfish!!!!! Wow! I even learned to suck the heads! (I'm so proud of myself) :rolleyes: Cornbread. mmmmmmmmm Greens, I allways believed that you mustn't cook any veggy that long, I was sooooooooo wrong! I've discovered that there is No waste of any part of the animal, especially the pig. Still, I have so many questions............

The downside, which actually has an upside also, because I have had to learn to shop online and cook the things that aren't avaliable here, There isn't an asian market, sushi, or Pho for at least 200 miles from here! :shock: No fresh oysters and clams. The crab and salmon are Frozen. Ick! I would allmost kill for Korean! Thank god for the cooking forum!

All that aside, these are the most honest, kind, helpfull, sweet, and friendly people I have ever met. It seems that food, and the sharing of it, is the southern way of saying "welcome to our world, make yourself at home".

So, fill me in, I want to learn all there is to know about this slow and easy lifestyle and ways of cooking. What other delights of southern food and hospitality do I have yet to experience?

Thanks for the warm southern welcome to all.

Brenda

I whistfully mentioned how I missed sushi. Truly horrified, she told me "you city folk eat the strangest things!", and offered me a freshly fried chitterling!

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Welcome to the south, nonblonde007.

My husband and I lived in Little Rock for five years, until April of last year. I was raised in southwest Arkansas and agree that the food is wonderful. I hope someone told you about dipping your cornbread in the "pot liquor" left from the greens.

I love sushi and feel your pain. I have visited your part of the state and think it is beautiful, and also sadly lacking in any kind of ethnic groceries or cuisine.

My sister lives in Jonesboro, but does not really cook much so I don't know if there are ethnic grocery stores there. I know I saw one place there that sold sushi, but I can't vouch for it as the only restaurant we ever go to there is Omar's. (It is great!)

If you ever make it down to the Little Rock area, you will find many(at least by Arkansas standrds) ethnic restaurants and several Asian and Latino grocery stores.

Sorry I can't be of more help.

Preach not to others what they should eat, but eat as becomes you and be silent. Epicetus

Amanda Newton

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I would be surprized if you couldnt find those things in Fayettville. There is a great market there called Ozark foods. Their version of a Whole Foods, but with a lot of local stuff. The farmers market is really cool. A ton of local raised "salad bar"--grass fed meats.

Between you and Rogers is War Eagle Mill in War Eagle. They have what I believe to be the best stone ground grits as well as all flours ect.. Cool little place on a stream that turns the wheel that turns the milling stone.

Gorganzola, Provolone, Don't even get me started on this microphone.---MCA Beastie Boys

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davebr,

Thank you. I checked the map and Fayettville seems to be only around a hundred or so miles from me. Sounds like an Awsome reason for a road trip!! Its very difficult to get good cuts of meat here, I can't even find shank or soup bones. Odd, considering that there are cows all around me. I am currently looking for a couple of cow/calf pairs, and am even having a hard time finding those. I can't wait to have all of that beautifuly aged meat and every kind of "nasty bits" to experiment and play with. I am just learning grits, they are Faaabulous! Thank you so for all the advice.

shellfishfiend,

No one had to tell me about the pot liquor, I figured that one out instantly, seemed more polite than just tipping the bow up and licking the insides in public! Thanks for the welcome, and for sharing my sushi withdraws. Nice to know I'm not the only one. Everyone around here gets a fastinated, horrified glaze in thier eyes if I mention raw fish. For some reason a certain type of doctors name keeps comming up in conversation..........

kidding, well sort of.

:wink:

Brenda

I whistfully mentioned how I missed sushi. Truly horrified, she told me "you city folk eat the strangest things!", and offered me a freshly fried chitterling!

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a few things that come to mind...

1) if you're going to make tea, make it sweet.

2) grits are perfectly acceptable morning, noon or night.

3) bbq doesn't mean the same thing down here like it does in yankeeland.

Thank you, these I have learned.

1) I can't stand anything sweet in my drink, Love tea with lots of lemon. (I get very strange looks for that one!)

2) :smile: Grits mmmmmmmm can't get them up north, they don't even know what they are!

3) bbq means cooked on a grill and in the case of pork, smothered in sause. I have come to understand, it's entirely different here, meaning; smoked? no sause? and unbelievably delicious! The kids, however, don't care for it. Just as well, more for me!

Brenda

I whistfully mentioned how I missed sushi. Truly horrified, she told me "you city folk eat the strangest things!", and offered me a freshly fried chitterling!

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I'd strongly recommend that you read Being Dead is No Excuse, the southern lady's guide to throwing the perfect funeral.

Although it's written by the ladies of the Mississippi Delta, and they're so "southern" that sweet tea runs in their veins and they make Arkansas look like a bunch of yankees, it still will give you an excellent glimpse into the styles, customs and culture of the south.

It's also hilarious, and chock full of great southern recipes.

I'm sort of in your neck o' the woods - Springfield MO - and also used to live in Alaska (Fairbanks). You should take your family to Eureka Springs for a weekend outing. It's a wonderful little artsy town and there's lots to do.

I really admire your positive, upbeat attitude. I've lived over 38 places in my lifetime and long ago discovered that you can either whine and complain about what you don't have in the new spot, or you can concentrate on what's wonderful. You clearly have adopted the latter approach and I applaud you.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Welcome to nonblonde007, There is a source of very good breads in your part of the world. It is Serenity Farm Bakery over by Leslie on highway 65. Here is a picture of what to look for when you wander over that way.

As for those grits from War Eagle, they are wonderful, I cook them slowly, sometimes with a little cream. They also take spices pretty well. And to finish with some cheese, yum, cheese grits. And for all those Yankees who have never had grits, every time they wax poetic over a plate of Polenta, Italian grits.

If you need an Asian Fix, head on down to Little Rock.

The farmers market in Fayetteville is great. It is located around the town square in downtown. Awesome vegies, and tomatoes should be coming in soon.

I used to go visit friends in Heber Springs and restaurant choices there, you just could not be chosey, the Red Apple Inn was a nice place to stay especially if you all golf.

And Eureka Springs is a little victorian mountain town with excellent arts and some decent restaurants. There are lots of shops, all locally owned, no mall stores, lots of little b&b's or a couple of old hotels left over from the late 1800s that have been updated to stay at. It is perfect for a weekend getaway.

It is good to be a BBQ Judge.  And now it is even gooder to be a Steak Cookoff Association Judge.  Life just got even better.  Woo Hoo!!!

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Jaymes,

So, first thing this morning.......I rush to Amazon and order 2 things, Being dead is no excuse and Bones, by Jennifer McLagen. (the latter just because I HAD to.) :biggrin:

I took the boys to Springfield to drop my hubby at the airport, and we had a wonderful time exploring! They were so excited......."look Mom, a MALL" Hadn't seen one since our visit to New Orleans, they are soooooooooo deprived! Branson is the cutest town around. Had to do the go-carts and of course, SUSHI! Sadly, having allways been coastal, it wasn't exactly fresh to my tastes and I stuck with the time-honored basics, to be safe. but still, siiiiggghhh.

Where in Fairbanks were you? I grew up homesteading 100 acres around Salcha on the Tanana River. In a lot of ways there are some similarities to the lifestyles between here and there. Everything we ate, we hunted, and nothing was wasted. If we couldn't eat it or make something of it, we used it as bait or gave it to the dogs. Hunting and fishing were not only a way of life, but life itself. I had learned many great lessons in my early years, could catch my own dinner and cook it up by the age of 8. Hospitality was a given. People, few and far between depended on each other for life itself. Powdered milk :wacko: Nasty! (once a month trip into Fairbanks if we could make it out)

The south, at least this part, I have noticed is though milder, the same. Everyone hunts and fishes, and actually Eats what they catch! (don't tell anyone in Washington, they would be Outraged!) There is little waste here, all the parts will find a way to be used. Neighbors rely on each other to allways "keep an eye", and are so friendly and helpfull. It seems that like in Ak., people here truly Get it, life is about living, and all those around you are part of it. not seperate from it.

EWWWWW! I sound close to preachy! Please Stop me!

Thank you joiei, for the great tips.

I was grinning as I read your Polenta line, I tried to tell a friend of mine in Wa, who Loved Italian and wrinkled her nose at me when I mentioned yummy grits,(I could just see it through the phone) that polenta and grits are basicly the same thing, kissin cousins, and she would have None of hearing that! I guess grits are the red-headed stepchild. I gave up. We are off to Little Rock, the airport again, next week, I am looking forward to finding and Asian market and *fingers crossed* either Korean or sushi.

Brenda

I whistfully mentioned how I missed sushi. Truly horrified, she told me "you city folk eat the strangest things!", and offered me a freshly fried chitterling!

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As a transplanted Northerner myself, I try not to talk too much about the South, where I live now, for it is much more fun to listen to Rachel, much much more, and the others, too. My speech lilts and sings only sometimes, and always in response to someone that's talking that way to me, but I love it here and would guess you might too, nonblonde.

Really, I wasn't going to say anything at all till I read this

the red-headed stepchild 

and realized it was a Call to Action for me. :smile:

There were several things you might enjoy that I've posted here before - the first one has gone missing but it was on my neighbor up the street when I lived in the rural south who one night choked on his roast groundhog and woke up the town with the emergency services going to his house. There were some good memories and notes on cooking groundhog in that thread if I remember correctly. So please let me know if you come across any new groundhog recipes.

It would also be interesting to know if you come across any regional recipes for Beans and Taters which we discussed in this thread . . . they have a place in my heart.

I found the South to be not only charming in the way of living close to the land but also in surprising one with its hidden layers of sophistication, similar to what occured in this thread when I lived in yet another rural area of the South.

In my own case, my food habits have just evolved or devolved, depending on how one looks at it, to fit the place I live. Any urges for things that don't exist here have lessened with time and have taken on the aspect of Victorian stuffed animals under glass - slightly dusty and not to be thought about too much. It might as well be a different country sometimes, from "here" where I live and "there" in the big city where I used to live.

But all in all, my preference is to live here and get on planes sometimes to go "there". Hope you enjoy your stay, too. :smile:

Edited by Carrot Top (log)
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...the south...with its hidden layers of sophistication...

Very perceptive.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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nonblonde007,

Here are some of the markets in Little Rock. Sam's Oriental was the one I went to most often. It was not always the cleanest, but was usually pretty busy and had a large selection.

My favorite sushi was at Sekisushi on N.Shackelford Road. Mt. Fuji, on Rodney Parham, was also good (but the service could be rude). There is a new sushi place downtown in the RiverMarket area, but I don't know much about it.

Let me know if you need other recommendations. I am sorry, I don't know of any Koren places.

(came off the UAMS website, so not sure how current)

MyAsian Foods & Gift Shop

3002 S. University Ave.

Little Rock, AR 72204

501.562.4087

Oriental Market and Seafood

350 Smokey Lane

North Little Rock, AR 72117

501.562.2720

Asian Groceries

9100 Rodney Parham Road, LR 72205.

501.221.9977

P I Oriental Mart

1525 W. Main St.

Jacksonville, AR 72204

501.982.0973

Oriental Food Store

408 W. Main St.

Jacksonville, AR 72076

501.955.0161

Sam's Oriental Store

3704 S. University Ave.

Little Rock, AR 72204

501.562.2720

San Jose Grocery Store & Bakery

7411 Geyer Springs RD, Little Rock, 72209

501.565.4246

Taqueria Karina Restaurant and Tortilla Factory

5309 W. 65th St.

501.562.3957

La Postosina

5412 Baseline Road

Little Rock, AR 72209

501.565.1238

La Regional

7414 Baseline Road

Little Rock, AR 72209

501.565.4440

Indian Grocers

11121 N. Rodney Parham Road,

Suite 3 - 4a

Little Rock, AR 72212

501.227.8203

Miles African Caribbean Food Store

8211 Geyer Springs Road, Suite P2

Little Rock, AR 72209

501.562.7211

Preach not to others what they should eat, but eat as becomes you and be silent. Epicetus

Amanda Newton

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WOW!

Great list, shellfishfiend, Thank you!

Brenda

I whistfully mentioned how I missed sushi. Truly horrified, she told me "you city folk eat the strangest things!", and offered me a freshly fried chitterling!

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  • 5 weeks later...
3)  bbq means cooked on a grill and in the case of pork, smothered in sause.  I have come to understand, it's entirely different here, meaning; smoked? no sause? and unbelievably delicious!  The kids, however, don't care for it.  Just as well, more for me!

I have to say it used to drive me nuts when people (here in CA and in Boston, too) say "we're having a barbecue!". And then you'd show up and find hot dogs and hamburgers cooking on the grill. Sorry, imo that's a cookout or some such thing, not a BBQ.

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3)  bbq means cooked on a grill and in the case of pork, smothered in sause.  I have come to understand, it's entirely different here, meaning; smoked? no sause? and unbelievably delicious!  The kids, however, don't care for it.  Just as well, more for me!

I have to say it used to drive me nuts when people (here in CA and in Boston, too) say "we're having a barbecue!". And then you'd show up and find hot dogs and hamburgers cooking on the grill. Sorry, imo that's a cookout or some such thing, not a BBQ.

and the choir said, "AMEN!". That is not a barbecue that is a cook out. Barbecue is pork, period, smoked, period, for a great length of time, period.

(I like your friend and his "offering". Having 3 & 1/2 out side cats--including a stray that spends half his time on our back deck--we have had more than our share of them.)

in loving memory of Mr. Squirt (1998-2004)--

the best cat ever.

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