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Cookwithlove

Kitchen Thermometers

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Any expert here on thermometer? I wanted to post this subject here for somethings now but memory failed me. TodayI give I a go. Cooking is about playing with temperature.

How to distinguish and buy thermometer for the various cooking method for example;

a) Deep fryer(very important), to test the temperature of hot oil,

b) To test hot liquid like stock, sauce and hot water,

c) oven (if your built-in one is faculty,

Can't recall there are many more!

Keep the sharing coming in.

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For quick temperature readings, a fast-read Thermapen is expensive but really cool and precise. Flashing one will get you respect from the health department inspectors, because they use them too.

For something you can leave in the food, oil or oven and read remotely, Polder probe thermometers are indispensible and quite cheap.

Any expert here on thermometer? I wanted to post this subject here for somethings now but memory failed me. TodayI give I a go. Cooking is about playing with temperature.

How to distinguish and buy thermometer for the various cooking method for example;

a) Deep fryer(very important), to test the temperature of hot oil,

b) To test hot liquid like stock, sauce and hot water,

c) oven (if your built-in one is faculty,

 

Can't recall there are many more!

Keep the sharing coming in.

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I use a number of thermometers in the kitchen. My favorites and gotos are the probe electronic type. I like these because they can be left in the food for the whole cooking and because some have a wide range and they are usually pretty accurate. However, I also like photography thermometers that are accurate down to the degree for things like double-checking expensive steaks, setting custards, and other somewhat sensitive work. I also like accurate thermometers for proofing, fermenting, and sourdough whatnot that often requires long periods of near-room-temperatures that are within a degree of a target. Then there are the strip-type yeast thermometers that you get from red star. I like these and refer to them often when baking.

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Im looking for a professional thermometer for use in the restaurant. Been checking out some industry probes and would like anyone whose played around with any good ones if they could share a bit. Planning to spend between $50-150, with a really good temperature range -50 C to +300 C, with 0.1 C resolution and preferably 0.5 C accuracy.

Are the Thermapen's any good? Seem quite basic and simple, which is fine, but expensive so im guessing their quite durable. Also was looking into those combo thermometers, probe and infrared.

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I'm not sure if you're going to find anything that accurate in that price range--most are going to be +/- 1 degree.

I use a Fluke 561 infrared model that accepts type-K thermocouples and am quite happy with it. I've tried the comparable Thermoworks versions, and while they certainly come packed with more features, I found the build quality to be pretty sub-par, and whatever method they use to adjust the emissivity setting is pretty much a joke--there is simply no setting that will ever bring the infrared and thermocouple readings into agreement in any situation that I threw at it. The buttons underneath the display panel also stick underneath the housing if you aren't extremely careful to push straight down, and the trigger button is so sensitive that simply holding the unit in your hand will set it off, making it difficult to keep a reading on the screen long enough for you to look at it.

The Thermapens I have not tried, but if I were going to get one I'd go for the one that you can switch probes on.

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The Thermapens I have not tried, but if I were going to get one I'd go for the one that you can switch probes on.

Good point about the probes, i'll have to look into that. Thanks.

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Hi ... I'd like a recommendation for a simple, inexpensive, instant read thermometer. I want to stick it in meat and use it to measure the temp of my lemon curd. At this point I see no further use for it, but I don't know what else I may use it for down the road.

I have an inexpensive thermometer, but it took forever to reach the 170-degrees I was looking for while making my lemon curd this evening.

Thanks!

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Whatever you buy, calibrate it using crushed ice water to see what it reads when it should be reading 32ºF.

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I love my ThermaPen!!

PLus the company has many other great products--I have a dual probe with a ceramic probes for flare up temps, in grilling , I have thier IR Gun , and a basic insertion meat temp probe.

Cheers stay warm!!

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I have a Thermapen which I won in a cooking competition, and it is very good.

Previous to that, I bought a $3.00 digital probe thermometer on ebay. It is accurate for general cooking, not as fast as a Thermapen, but fast enough.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Digital-LCD-Cooking-Food-Probe-Meat-Kitchen-BBQ-Selectable-Sensor-Thermometer-/221349794803?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item338979d3f3

It has been 5? 6? 7? years, I am still using it, when I am smoking in the basement,

In general, the thinner the tip, the faster the reading.

dcarch

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I have several thermometers and all are from Thermoworks. The Super-Fast one - in the link from DiggingDogFarm is excellent. It is certainly fast and it is WATERPROOF, which is not true of other inexpensive units.

It can be thoroughly washed and rinsed in hot water, if one has happened to drop it into a pan of milk just getting to the desired temp of 180° F. Which (from personal experience) will "kill" most of the dial-type thermometers instantly.

Right now it is $19.00 and that is a great price. And that little ring on top - - means you can suspend the thermometer from a string and leave it in the liquid, if you want to leave it in something that is temp critical while you watch it at brief intervals.

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Thanks for all the useful responses. A few suggestions look like they warrant further investigation, although at the moment I'm inclined towards this one: http://www.thermoworks.com/products/low_cost/rt600c.html. They all look to be a lot better than the slow-as-sludge Taylor that I have. Fortunately, the Taylor was free.

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TP keeping it fresh. I already own 2 Thermopens. Original and splashproof. Hard to justify a new one but at least they are constantly improving

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I've got a few and almost all are from Thermoworks.  The DOT is the one I'm using the most now - it's the same probe size as the Thermapen, it can be left in product for monitoring or used as a hand held for quick checking..  I also like the Thermapens a lot and keep one for the kitchen and one for the grill.  And of course a two channel meter with K type probes for the smoker and the grill. 

 

 

dot_black_z_p.jpg

 

 

 

 

http://www.thermoworks.com/products/alarm/dot.html

 

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My most recent Thermoworks order arrived tonight.  I must have looked most pathetic wandering around the apartment with two cases of thermometers, looking for a surface upon which to set them down.*  I now have six thermometers from Thermoworks, not a few probes -- and my old standby from Hewlett-Packard...or whatever that company is called these days.

 

I really love how firmly the magnetic boot of the Therma Waterproof sticks itself to the dashboard of my stove.  That is beautiful engineering!  It would have been most useful two nights ago when I was following a Kenji recipe to heat a pan to between 600 and 700 deg F.

 

 

*they are currently on top of the guitar case along with the extra griddles for my DeLonghi grill.  The door is barricaded in the event anyone was thinking of an intervention.

 

 

 

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