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RICE


Ben Hong
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When I say cup, I mean the measuring cup that comes with the rice cooker...not your standard western measuring cup

Oh, ok. I lost the cup that comes with the rice cooker long ago, so i've just been guessing, and putting in 2 cups of dry rice with 2.25 cups of water.

One more question - for anyone who makes joongzi, do you use regular water or broth ?

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One more question - for anyone who makes joongzi, do you use regular water or broth ?

Regular water.

The filling will flavor the rice.

When I saw your question, echocolate, I thought you meant jook (Chinese rice soup)and not joongzi (sticky rice in bamboo or other kinds of leaves). As milady replied, use water. Broth would be a waste for boiling joongzi. You can, however, use broth to make jook.

Sheena: Throw some bay leaves in with your bag of rice. They keep moths out of cupboards, so they should work in the rice.

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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  • 8 months later...

Any suggestions for which brand of rice to buy for white and brown rice? I'm looking for the best overall, with price no object, as well as the best bang for buck rice in terms of price to quality.

There's a Ranch 99 fairly close to where I work, but I find all the different brands and choices overwhelming. Or, do I need to go to a Japanese supermarket to get the best rice?

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It really depends on the type of rice you want (long grain, short grain, medium grain, etc.).

If you're looking for recommendations for a short grain Japanese rice, then you might want to post in the Japan forum. There is some discussion of Californian Japanese rices in this thread:

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=69939

Baker of "impaired" cakes...
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It really depends on the type of rice you want (long grain, short grain, medium grain, etc.).

If you're looking for recommendations for a short grain Japanese rice, then you might want to post in the Japan forum. There is some discussion of Californian Japanese rices in this thread:

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=69939

I'm looking for a short grain, although I'm willing to try all different varieties.

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  • 2 years later...

What type of rice is appropriate in Chinese cooking? I am taking about the typical rice to be served with almost every meal; not sticky rice. What types of rice that are commonly sold in the USA are closest to the types used in China? Are there regional types of rice that are favored or is the preferred type the same throughout the nation?

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What type of rice is appropriate in Chinese cooking? I am taking about the typical rice to be served with almost every meal; not sticky rice. What types of rice that are commonly sold in the USA are closest to the types used in China? Are there regional types of rice that are favored or is the preferred type the same throughout the nation?

Jasmine. Long grain. Product of Thailand or Texas.

My favorite brand:

Buddha Thai Fragrant Rice

Like in this package:

http://www.alibaba.com/product-free/214489156/Buddha_Thai_Fragrant_Rice.html

W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"
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Currently in the pantry are:

Arborio for ristto

White and Brown Basmati to go with curries, byriani, kedgeree, etc.

Jasmine rice for Chinese/Thai food

American Brown Long Grain for Jamaican rice and peas

and last but not least Pudding Rice for err..rice pudding.

The trouble I find with brown rice is that it takes so damn long to cook. On the plus, side it is more difficult to over cook!

if food be the music of love, eat on.

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I don't get much choice in my rice brands at the moment because I live in a small tow, but in general I prefer long grain brown rice. As I eat a lot of Chinese food, the choice of rice may seem weird, but I love the whole grain flavor with some of the potent Chinese sauces--in particular Sichuan style dishes.

After reading so much about Jasmine rice, I will definitely get a bag. I also sometimes like to throw in some long grain white rice or a bit of the Botan calrose rice. By this point I have nearly exhausted my choices of rice, so I will move on from there.

Luckily, I'll be in Atlanta after about two months, so I will get to expand my selection somewhat.

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I was listening to an Indian chef (Atul Kochhar) on TV recently and he mentioned that in India rice is often 'put down' for a period of time before consuming. By this he inferred that bags of rice where stored in a cellar for a while before eating (in a similar way to wine, but not for as long). According to Mr Kochhar, this helped develop the flavour of the rice.

This was not something that I had come across before. Is it an Indian thing or do other rice eating nations do this also?

if food be the music of love, eat on.

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I was listening to an Indian chef (Atul Kochhar) on TV recently and he mentioned that in India rice is often 'put down' for a period of time before consuming. By this he inferred that bags of rice where stored in a cellar for a while before eating (in a similar way to wine, but not for as long). According to Mr Kochhar, this helped develop the flavour of the rice.

This was not something that I had come across before. Is it an Indian thing or do other rice eating nations do this also?

The first time I heard about "aged" basmati, I was revolted...because in my cultural tradition, the best rice is new crop!

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Medium grain rice is my choice.

It is nice when rice has a flavor all it's own, but to me I like the chewy texture of the medium grain, and having the flavor come from whatever I'm eating with it. When sauce, from a dish is on the rice, the rice stands out because of that texture. It also sticks together enough so that you can get a chopstickful in one scoop.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I agree with Kat Tanaka, the best rice is fresh rice.

I used to prefer Jasmine rice (my Dad would buy that for the family in the Philippines when I was growing up), but now I love the Icheon rice here in Korea. It is short, sticky, sweet and very fragrant. And surprisingly makes good fried rice too (once you've put in in the fridge overnight).

Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

"Nobody loves pork more than a Filipino"

eGFoodblog: Adobo and Fried Chicken in Korea

The dark side... my own blog: A Box of Jalapenos

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I prefer most any rice with bran on it to rice without, and these days I buy probably about twice as much Thai sticky black rice to brown basmati, and except for a few dishes like Mujadarrah (just wouldn't look right with a black or medium grain rice), I tend to interchange rices depending on my whim that day: wehani, japonica, Thai red rice, short grain Chinese black 'forbidden' rice....

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