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Nashi are kind of apple-shaped pears.

Sorry about that!

In the US at least they are referred to as Asian pears.

Nashi season is from about September to November, so they should be appearing in stores soon, especially the Asian markets.

A great time to try out the recipe!

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
torakris, I do something much the same but use mirin and no sugar, sake or Shaoxing, and about two and a half times the black pepper.

For the fruit, I find that Fuji apples and pears work well.

I usually double the amount of pepper myself, but i find that even 1 tablespoon freaks most people out and they end up using only about a teaspoon. It is really the black pepper that makes the dish, don't be afraid of it folks! Even at 2 Tablespoons there is only a hint of it!

My recipe is similar to these - same ingredients - slightly different proportions.

In the summer, I use a flank steak. Score it well on both sides. Then, cut the scored steak across the grain into strips about 1" wide. Marinate the strips for several hours or, best, overnight. Cook outside on BBQ.

In the winter, I also use a flank steak, but freeze it first. Then slice across the grain into very, very thin strips. This is easy to do for bulgogi, or pepper beef or whatever, if the meat is frozen while you're slicing it. Then marinate for several hours. Then I either fry it in a wok, or broil in oven.

BUT - for the marinade, I use Korean soy sauce.

And, MOST IMPORTANT, I ALWAYS add, in addition to the black pepper, several whole pods of those fabulous dried red Asian hot peppers that you get in Oriental markets, and that you see in many dishes in Asian restaurants. Have lived a few places where they were not available, so didn't use them. I can tell you for sure, bulgogi isn't as good without them. At least not in my opinion.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Awesome information--thanks everyone for this great thread!

I'm in the Chicago-area but I've never had Blind Faith's rendition.

Maybe I'll give it a try, although my last few experiences there were also not so good.

Probably my best bet is to make it myself which I think I can actually do after reading all these great posts.

=R=

"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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If you add a little bit of sesame oil, it gives the whole thing a really nice flavor.

I love sesame oil.

I read somewhere that it's really a good moisturizer to put on your face, and that Liz Taylor uses it exclusively.

I tried it. What a mess. And worse, I kept having an irresistable urge for Korean.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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I read somewhere that it's really a good moisturizer to put on your face, and that Liz Taylor uses it exclusively.

I tried it.  What a mess.  And worse, I kept having an irresistable urge for Korean.

Really? I heard that olive oil is a really good moisturizer.

Of course I get a feeling if I tried it, I would totally break out...

Some korean meats are dipped into sesame oil and sea salt as a condiment. Yum.

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I don't know where the stress goes in words like "dolsot", "banchan" and "gomasio", so I guessed. I play a bit loose with "kimchee", stressing it on the first syllable in one case, and on the last in another. Also, I have no idea whether Dalton Trumbo ever had panache. Let's say he did.

Bibimbap!

A fortnight ago, at a bistro I frequent,

I set out to order myself something piquant.

With all the panache of a young Dalton Trumbo

I hailed a waiter and ordered the gumbo.

The gumbo arrived. It was cold and translucent.

And much as I hate to be seen as a nuisance,

I yelled, "Please remove this gelatinous slop,

And bring me a bowl of your best Bibimbap!

"Bibimbap, sir?" the waiter inquired,

"And what, may I ask, did this craving inspire?

We have on our menu eclectic selections

So trendy they'd give Paul Bocouse an erection.

Our chef uses all of the latest ingredients,

Assembled on platters with utmost expedience.

The dish is just rice cooked with meat, is it not?

Is that what you mean when you say 'Bibimbap'?"

I cradled my head and silently wept.

Why was I cursed with this grossly inept

Little twerp of a waiter who calls himself "Reed",

Is all of nineteen, listens only to Creed,

And hasn't yet tasted life's bitterest dregs.

"You might as well say that an omelette's 'just eggs',"

I exclaimed in a voice that rang out like a shot:

"There's much more than that to a good Bibimbap!"

"'Bibim' means 'stir things together', and 'bap'

Is Korean for 'rice'. But it's what goes on top

Of the rice once it's boiled that makes it a dish:

Vegetables, tofu, some meat, even fish!

But first, take your dolsot (a bowl made of stone)

And get it real hot on the top of the stove.

Throw in a test grain of rice. If it pops,

You're ready to start making your Bibimbap!

Fill the hot dolsot two-thirds full of rice

Add kimchee, chopped scallion, fried tofu is nice,

Some steamed greens, perhaps microgreens, if you care,

Some red chile powder, or threads, if you dare.

Or you can use banchan, which, like DNA,

Can be combined in such wonderful ways.

At last, lay a raw or fried egg on the top,

Gomasio sprinkles -- voila! Bibimbap!

The waiter, impressed by my bold exposition

Retreated, post haste, to the restaurant's kitchen,

From whence, in a heartbeat, some figures emerged,

And seventeen men at my table converged.

They lifted me up like a speck of kimchee

And bodily threw me right out on the street.

I picked myself up. Like a hero, I rallied,

And marched right back in, and ordered a salad.

--

ID

--

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Bravo.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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  • 1 month later...

Worked late last night, got home after riding bike through crappy Scottish cold rain for half an hour, wife sick in bed. Made bibimbapoid meal with chinese sausage, yellow beans, dried shrimp, greens, holy basil. Cracked egg on top. Question: I steamed rice with all ingredients mixed through (cracked egg on top for last five minutes) is this bibimbap or just a pilaw? Egg was excellent, white had texture of silken tofu and had taken up a lot of the aromatics.

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Worked late last night, got home after riding bike through crappy Scottish cold rain for half an hour, wife sick in bed. Made bibimbapoid meal with chinese sausage, yellow beans, dried shrimp, greens, holy basil. Cracked egg on top. Question: I steamed rice with all ingredients mixed through (cracked egg on top for last five minutes) is this bibimbap or just a pilaw? Egg was excellent, white had texture of silken tofu and had taken up a lot of the aromatics.

You steamed all of the ingredients together? Interesting!

Not exactly bibimbap in the traditional sense, but sounds good.

I had bibimbap for lunch this week at my Korean friend's house, complete with a side of homemade kimchi. Wonderful!

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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I had dolsot bibimbap for lunch yesterday. The place near my work has new ownership and has gone a bit downhill, but middling bibimbap is better than none. I really, really need to get my own dolsot.

Also, that poem is the best thing ever, I failed to mention earlier.

Matthew Amster-Burton, aka "mamster"

Author, Hungry Monkey, coming in May

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  • 4 months later...

I need to have this bibimbap.

I read with interest the Chicago-area spots where you can get bibimbap . . . don't care to go all the way to Evanston, and don't want vegetarian bibimbap my first time.

Meat!

Am in Chicago again this weekend, not doing any work, just going with a friend of mine to enjoy my new (soon-to-be) apartment and eat, eat, eat.

Where in Chicago proper can one get a good bibimbap?

Noise is music. All else is food.

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If I did, I'd have to find another rhyme for "selection".

Bibimbap deserves its due, tis' true

but don't forget the galbi.

Ribs, the short kind, flamed so nicely

are what we need to see.

Jon Lurie, aka "jhlurie"

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Hey I never claimed to be an Ivan. I just think that other things deserve poetry besides the 'bap.

Maybe an ode to Yum Nuer? An epic about Tonkatsu? We need more, obviously.

Jon Lurie, aka "jhlurie"

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we need a larb song.

(to the tune of the Ren and Stimpy "Log" song / the Slinky song)

All kids love Larb!

What's made from ground meat,

and tossed in a wok,

with enough chili to flatten a mob?

What's great for a snack,

and easy as heck,

It's Larb..Larb..Larb!!

It's La-rb, La-rb

It's spicy, its Thai,

It's wet!

It's La-rb, La-rb

It's better than bad

It's good!!!

Everyone want's a Larb

You're gonna love it Larb

Come on and get your Larb

Everyone needs a Larb

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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I first had bibimbap in grad school at the University of Michigan. There are-- or were at the time a few years ago-- three or so Korean diners in town (which always struck me as a little weird, for a town the size of Ann Arbor). Anyway, you could get a nice big bowl of bibimbap for like four or five bucks. I lived off the stuff for two years, and could probably eat it every day and be completely happy.

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I first had bibimbap in grad school at the University of Michigan.  There are-- or were at the time a few years ago-- three or so Korean diners in town (which always struck me as a little weird, for a town the size of Ann Arbor).  Anyway, you could get a nice big bowl of bibimbap for like four or five bucks.  I lived off the stuff for two years, and could probably eat it every day and be completely happy.

Great stuff isn't it? :biggrin:

nice to be talking about bibimbap again!

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Great stuff isn't it? :biggrin:

nice to be talking about bibimbap again!

I like Korean food, but I've never had bibimbop. Next time I eat Korean I'm going to have to try it.

BTW, anyone read the article in the NY Times dining section about Korean home cooking?

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Great stuff isn't it? :biggrin:

nice to be talking about bibimbap again!

I like Korean food, but I've never had bibimbop. Next time I eat Korean I'm going to have to try it.

Don't forget to have some yuke with your bibimbap! :biggrin:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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