Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Recommended Posts

chantal   

Can someone elaborate on the red spicy sweet stuff in red tub? I'd love the name of it or how to make it. Oh and so If I heat my lodge griddle in the oven at 450 for 20 mins then pull it out, heat the electric burner using the griddle as a flame tamer and put my ceramic (spanish terracota) on that, , do you think this will work? Or should I just crank the terracota in the oven, pull it fill it with rice and return to oven for 5-10 minutes. Seems like that might work better. What do you all think? I am guessing I should oil the pot? Or do you want it to stick? I am wondering if I could get the rice crusty using a nonstick skillet and then transfer rice to a hot bowl?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jinmyo   
Can someone elaborate on the red spicy sweet stuff in red tub?  I'd love the name of it or how to make it.  Oh and so If I heat my lodge griddle in the oven at 450 for 20 mins then pull it out, heat the electric burner using the griddle as a flame tamer and put my ceramic (spanish terracota) on that, , do you think this will work?  Or should I just crank the terracota in the oven, pull it fill it with rice and return to oven for 5-10 minutes.  Seems like that might work better.  What do you all think?  I am guessing I should oil the pot?  Or do you want it to stick?    I am wondering if I could get the rice crusty using a nonstick skillet and then transfer rice  to a hot bowl?

Stuff in red tub: Gojuchang, Korean miso paste with chile.

No oiling, no sticking with stone. Terracotta will stick so you could try rubbing it with a mixture of a neutral oil like grapeseed with a few zots of sesame oil.

Crisping rice seperately then adding it is a foul and evil trick but worth doing.One could crisp rice on a silpat and cut intro triangles that one thrusts here and there into the faux bibimbap. Not that I would, I'm just saying. (A few extra on a plate with a nice shrimp paste dip are also nice. [Not that I would, I'm just saying.])

edit:

"wirth?" What?

"sperately?"

Who was typing this?

Probably that loose squirrel monkey all hopped up on Shangai bok choy again. Bloody menace, she is. Should be a law. Or just give me a taser and I'll shut her down.


Edited by Jinmyo (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
chantal   
Can someone elaborate on the red spicy sweet stuff in red tub?  I'd love the name of it or how to make it.  Oh and so If I heat my lodge griddle in the oven at 450 for 20 mins then pull it out, heat the electric burner using the griddle as a flame tamer and put my ceramic (spanish terracota) on that, , do you think this will work?  Or should I just crank the terracota in the oven, pull it fill it with rice and return to oven for 5-10 minutes.  Seems like that might work better.  What do you all think?  I am guessing I should oil the pot?  Or do you want it to stick?    I am wondering if I could get the rice crusty using a nonstick skillet and then transfer rice  to a hot bowl?

Stuff in red tub: Gojuchang, Korean miso paste with chile.

No oiling, no sticking witrh stone. Terracotta will stick so you could try rubbing it with a mixture of a neutal oil like grapeseed with a few zots of sesame oil.

Crisping rice sperately then adding it is a foul and evil trick but worth doing.One could crisp rice on a silpat and cut intro triangles that one thrusts here and there into the faux bibimbap. Not that I would, I'm just saying. (A few extra on a plate with a nice shrimp paste dip are also nice. [Not that I would, I'm just saying.])

Hey thanks. I actually wouldn't mind buying stone bowl but I have a tiny kitchen and I am really struggling as it is. I could do it in All-Clad couldn't I? I have a paella like casserole that might work better sice it has sloped sides. Also, how high should I heat the burner to crisp the rice? P.s. I am soooo jealous that you can get Shaoxing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As to the terracotta idea, I'm not sure 5-10 minutes would do the trick or that 450 would do it, either. Your rice might dry out a bit on the top while you're waiting for a sufficient crust to form. To get the degree and type of heat you'd want to make noohreunghi (the toasty rice crust), I'm inclined to say (very preheated) cast iron might do the trick better than terra cotta.

Just an FYI on gochujahng: while it is a bean paste in the sense that it is made with beans, as is miso, I would say it's more of a chili paste, as that's the dominant flavor/usage. The closer Korean condiment to miso is actually something called dwehnjahng, which is closer in both color and flavor to miso.

And while you probably will never see dwehnjahng given as the "sauce" (so to speak) for your bibimbahp in a restaurant, I love to doctor it up and use it instead, or in addition to, gochujahng when I make bibimbahp at home. Minced garlic, chopped green onions, sesame oil, sesame seeds, and just a pinch of sugar to round out the saltiness usually do the trick for me - oh and some chopped jalapeno is nice for added heat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
chantal   
As to the terracotta idea, I'm not sure 5-10 minutes would do the trick or that 450 would do it, either.  Your rice might dry out a bit on the top while you're waiting for a sufficient crust to form.  To get the degree and type of heat you'd want to make noohreunghi (the toasty rice crust), I'm inclined to say (very preheated) cast iron might do the trick better than terra cotta.

Just an FYI on gochujahng: while it is a bean paste in the sense that it is made with beans, as is miso, I would say it's more of a chili paste, as that's the dominant flavor/usage. The closer Korean condiment to miso is actually something called dwehnjahng, which is closer in both color and flavor to miso.

And while you probably will never see dwehnjahng given as the "sauce" (so to speak) for your bibimbahp in a restaurant, I love to doctor it up and use it instead, or in addition to, gochujahng when I make bibimbahp at home.  Minced garlic, chopped green onions, sesame oil, sesame seeds, and just a pinch of sugar to round out the saltiness usually do the trick for me - oh and some chopped jalapeno is nice for added heat.

Wow that was good. Thanks you guys!!! The cast iron suggestion was a good one. Got nice and crispy. Had a Korean roomate a long time ago who used to boil tofu then put a little sauce on it then top with green onions and seseame seeds. Would this little sauce be soy sauce, sesame oil, and chili oil. Does that sound right? Thanks again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Stuff in red tub: Gojuchang, Korean miso paste with chile.

Really?

the best bibimbap i've ever had was made by a Korean kid at a youth hostel on North Shore Oahu. Simple, simple, simple. I mean, have you ever seen hostel kitchens? And no exotic ingredients. Button mushrooms, bean sprouts, scallions, egg. It's the sesame oil and the red spicy-sweet stuff. Thats the key.

That's not bibimbap, that's bap with stuff mixed in, delicious to be sure, but not bibimbap.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As we've discussed before on other threads, Korean Americans in Hawaii have their own evolved Korean food traditions, especially with plate lunches like Bulgogi. It wouldn't suprise me that they have their own version of Bibimbap as well.

Stuff in red tub: Gojuchang, Korean miso paste with chile.

The "miso paste with red chile" is very likely Saemjang, of which there is a lot of variety between brands in terms of actual ingredients used . Gochujang (Wikipedia) as it is commercially sold in Korean supermarkets is mostly red pepper paste (yeah, its got rice powder and a small amount of fermented soybeans as well) which is added to other things to add spice, and there are a number of gochujang-based sauces as well -- a lot of Korean-style steak sauces contain it, as does korean-style "sashimi sauce". Saemjang, on the other hand, is an almost entirely fermented bean condiment that is used on a lot of dishes including bulgogi and kalbi, and again, there are some differences between brands, particularly in how fermented it is or how chunky it is. There are other variations of it, such as cheonggukjang which is even more fermented and is actually used to make a certain type of soup (jigae). My wife and I call it "funky sauce" for lack of a better description, its an acquired taste to be sure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks, Chris - very helpful suggestions.

The meal went really well.  I did most of my shopping at the Korean grocery in town, and that was quite the experience as hardly anything was in English.  But I managed to find all of the things that I needed.  I stopped at a few other stores to pick up other items.

Tammy - where is the Korean grocery? And which is your favorite bibimbop place - the one at Kerrytown?

We love Kang's Coffee Break on South U.

Our favorite Japanese restaurant here in Toledo (Kotobuki) is owned by a Korean, and they make an amazing bibimbop. They also have a bunch of other Korean dishes, though they aren't listed anywhere - I think they have them around just for staff meals.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tammylc   
Thanks, Chris - very helpful suggestions.

The meal went really well.  I did most of my shopping at the Korean grocery in town, and that was quite the experience as hardly anything was in English.  But I managed to find all of the things that I needed.  I stopped at a few other stores to pick up other items.

Tammy - where is the Korean grocery? And which is your favorite bibimbop place - the one at Kerrytown?

We love Kang's Coffee Break on South U.

Our favorite Japanese restaurant here in Toledo (Kotobuki) is owned by a Korean, and they make an amazing bibimbop. They also have a bunch of other Korean dishes, though they aren't listed anywhere - I think they have them around just for staff meals.

Hi Danielle! First things first - have you had your baby yet?

Now that the important questions have been asked...

Manna is the name of the Korean grocery, and it's on Broadway right near where it becomes Plymouth. It's a little tricky to find, especially since they used to be in this little shopping center, but that location closed and they moved right across the street!

I honestly haven't eaten much bibimbop in Ann Arbor other than the stuff at Kosmo in Kerrytown. I've been to Steve's Lunch once I think - not sure if I've been to Kang's (but a couple peopel have mentioned it so clearly I should give it a try).

There's a group in Ann Arbor that's starting a bibimbop tour - they want to try a different place each week until they've had them all. Alas, weekday lunches are more suited to students than working moms.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Danielle!  First things first - have you had your baby yet?

Now that the important questions have been asked...

Manna is the name of the Korean grocery, and it's on Broadway right near where it becomes Plymouth.  It's a little tricky to find, especially since they used to be in this little shopping center, but that location closed and they moved right across the street!

I honestly haven't eaten much bibimbop in Ann Arbor other than the stuff at Kosmo in Kerrytown.  I've been to Steve's Lunch once I think - not sure if I've been to Kang's (but a couple peopel have mentioned it so clearly I should give it a try).

There's a group in Ann Arbor that's starting a bibimbop tour - they want to try a different place each week until they've had them all.  Alas, weekday lunches are more suited to students than working moms.

Yes! He came three weeks early, on August 7 - we are doing great.

I'll have to check out that grocery - I can't wait to move back to Ann Arbor.

I hated Steve's lunch when I went - Kang's is much better - let me know what you think when you make it there.


Edited by daniellewiley (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tino27   

I have just recently been turned onto the joy that is Bi Bim Bap and found a local Korean place where I can order it. My dilemma though is that I am having trouble conveying to the chef that I want my egg sunny-side up so that I can break the yolk and mix all of the eggy goodness into the rest of the bowl. No matter what I try (and I've tried three times now), I can't seem to convey my message correctly. 3 times I've ordered it and 3 times the egg comes out completely cooked all the way through. The rest of the dish is fantastic though.

Any thoughts from you fellow Bi Bim Bap lovers out there? :blink:

I must have impressed my server (who I think was the wife of the cook/owner) because at the end of the meal she offered me a glass of soojunggwa (which was quite delicious).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kleatius   

Hey, a Bimbimbap thread! Nice!

Anyone know anything about the proper way to serve Gojuchang? If you eat it straight from the tub it doesn't have the same taste or consistency as when I've had it at Korean restaurants. I usually try making a sauce with Gojuchang, rice vinegar and sugar and it turns out pretty close to the real deal. Anyone have a proper recipe?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kleatius - what you're doing is right. Just mix a little rice vinegar, sugar and a little water to thin out the gochujang, put into a ketchup squeeze bottle and you have gochujang that is served in bibimbap restaurants. I'll try to see in my pics if I have a picture of that ketchup squeeze bottle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chufi   
Hey, a Bimbimbap thread! Nice!

there's another great bibimbap thread here!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jfrater   

Hey all - it is nice to see a bibimbap thread here! I thought I would post a photo of the most recent one I made (well my partner made it under my watchful eye and I plated it - normally I do all the Korean cooking). This is in the jeonju style - the area from which bibimbap first came - it has more vegetables than one normally finds on bibimbap and it also has gingko nuts, walnuts, and pine nuts.

5896614484_89378c57a8_b.jpeg

It was delicious :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By Kasia
      Courgette cutlets
       
      I found the recipe for courgette cutlets at www.gotujzcukiereczkiem.pl. It appealed to me at once for three reasons. Firstly, the courgette is my favourite vegetable. Secondly, cutlets, pancakes and crumpets are my children's favourites dishes. Thirdly, this dish is fast, simple and is always a success. You must not use FB while frying, because it may end with you ordering pizza for dinner 

      The cutlets are mild and their flavour is spiced up with feta cheese. You can complement them with your favourite herbs. In my kitchen there is always basil, dill, peppermint, rosemary and thyme. This time I chose dill (in accordance with the recipe) and thyme.

      Ingredients:
      400g of courgette
      1 egg
      150g of feta cheese
      110g of breadcrumbs (+ 4 tablespoons for the batter)
      2 tablespoons of minced dill
      1 tablespoon of thyme
      salt and pepper

      Wash the courgette and grate it. Add salt and leave it in a bowl for 15 minutes. Drain it then mix in the egg, feta cheese, breadcrumbs and herbs. Spice it up with salt and pepper. Make small cutlets with the mixture and fry in oil. Serve with natural yoghurt.
       
       

    • By Bijay@Sugar Daddy Bakes
      I am a Baker and Cake Decorator in India. India has a huge Vegetarian Population that does not even eat eggs/gelatin. So I am constantly looking at finding vegetarian options.
       
      Issue at Hand:
      Regular Butter Cream - American Butter Cream ( Icing Sugar 10X + Butter + Milk/Lemon Juice / Cream) is an option ..and a lot of decorators use this as it sets hard, and they also add shortening into it ..and I am like , Nope I can't eat that , much less serve it. Its too Sweet /Gritty and Crusts and just tasteless. It has also made sure that people in my country to completely throw out any butter cream cake . You say Butter Cream and they say - too Sweet/gritty.
      I have been successful in the last two years to break that impression by making European Meringue based butter cream - I love Swiss Meringue Butter Cream . It is smooth, just sweet enough , takes colour well, pipes well , and is mostly temperature stable. But I can't serve it to people who don't eat eggs.
      I have so far been making a substitute - Ermine/Rue/Cooked Butter Cream - a Flour + Milk+ Sugar custard (AKA Pastry Cream minus the eggs) and whipping butter into it. It tastes good - people like it ..nut its a misery to work with - will not hold shape , will not colour well , and most of all weeps and weeps some more when we chill the cakes.
       
      So I am looking for suggestions on finding a starch that will not weep  when frozen in a custard? And my second approach is to move to Aqua Faba to build the meringue and make SMBC. The starch custard option is easy and economical and does not leave me with mountains of Chickpeas .
       
      would  love to hear thoughts . 
       
      Thanks  
    • By Kasia
      Creamy soup with broad beans
       
      During my last visit to the fruit and vegetable market I bought so many broad beans that I didn't want to risk cooking everything at once. I prepared a rich, creamy soup with them. The green soup, served with a bit of thick yoghurt and nigella, was very tasty.
       
      Ingredients (for 5 people):
      1 kg of broad beans
      half an onion
      1 clove of garlic
      1 tablespoon of butter
      4 sprigs of thyme
      1 tablespoon of caraway seeds
      vegetable stock
      5 teaspoons of thick natural yoghurt
      2 teaspoons of nigella
      2 tablespoons of sunflowers seeds
      salt and pepper

      Cook the broad beans in salty water with the caraway seeds, drain and peel them. Try not to eat everything. Chop the onion and garlic and fry them in butter. Put the peeled broad beans, onion, garlic and sprigs of thyme into a saucepan. Pour in the vegetable stock to cover the vegetables and boil for 10 minutes. Take out the thyme and blend the soup to make a smooth cream. Add vegetable stock until you have the right consistence. Roast the sunflower seeds in a dry pan. Serve the soup with thick natural yoghurt, nigella and sunflower seeds.

      Enjoy your meal!
       
       

    • By pat_00
      OK so it's a bit weird, but I need help making some fake animals out of tofu.
      It's for a vegetarian party, the tricky thing is i need to make it look like the real thing.
      I have a mold ready to use, but it's not really oven safe.
      My idea is to use a basic tofu meatloaf recipe, put it in the mold and chill it until it sets, then transfer it to the oven.
      Anyone have any helpful ideas, or comments?
    • By anchita
      I'd appreciate knowing more about 'vegetarian' stocks. (The "hot soups" thread in the Indian forum got me thinking about this.)
      I assume basic vegetable stock-making would involve simmering cut vegetables in water and then straining the mixture. But what about the specific combinations and proportions of vegetables, addition of herbs and spices, length of time for simmering, reduction etc.
      Beside its obvious use as the base in soups, what other uses could one put this to (assuming that it doesn't possess the thickening property of the meat-based stocks)?
      edit: I did try to see if this topic has been covered elsewhere, but didn't get a specific result. I'd appreciate any pointers to previous discussions, if any.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×