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Guacamole


KARENR65
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I love, love, love guacamole. I have tried everything to keep it from discoloring but nothing really seems to work WELL. I have tried the "keeping the pit in it" and have not had much luck. What works best for me is putting into a seal-able container and putting plastic wrap on it so it is touching and then put the top on. Seems to work ok but in about a day or two, I get a thin layer of discoloration. Any suggestions, ideas???

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I love, love, love guacamole. I have tried everything to keep it from discoloring but nothing really seems to work WELL. I have tried the "keeping the pit in it" and have not had much luck. What works best for me is putting into a seal-able container and putting plastic wrap on it so it is touching and then put the top on. Seems to work ok but in about a day or two, I get a thin layer of discoloration. Any suggestions, ideas???

Hey KarenR65 -

Sorry to say you are doing it the best way possible. Guac is one of those things that has to be consumed fresh. Like pico de gallo, it will suffer with time.

John S.

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I agree. Keep doing what you're doing, but you should eat it within a couple of days any way.

Maybe this is a new topic, but how do you make your guac? My husband considers in heresy to use anything but avocadoes, lime juice and s&p, but I have a friend who makes an awesome version with avocadoes, cilantro, tomato, onion, jalapeno and s&p. He pulverizes half of the mixture with a mortar and pestle, then mixes it into chunks of the rest. So it has a great chunky texture, but the flavors are well mixed. When I make it this way, though, I do add lime juice.

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I mash up a few avocados with a fork (I like it somewhat chunky) a little scallions or onions, minced garlic, jalapeno (if I have it), lime juice and s&p. I could eat this by the spoonfuls. I thinking of trying on some sort of sandwich in place of mayo or mustard.

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I mash up a few avocados with a fork (I like it somewhat chunky) a little scallions or onions, minced garlic, jalapeno (if I have it), lime juice and s&p. I could eat this by the spoonfuls. I thinking of trying on some sort of sandwich in place of mayo or mustard.

I agree! Guac should never be eaten beyond 24 hrs at the most.

I would try using a wooden spoon to mix though. Metal might affect coloring and taste.

Edited by rconnelly (log)
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I mash up a few avocados with a fork (I like it somewhat chunky) a little scallions or onions, minced garlic, jalapeno (if I have it), lime juice and s&p. I could eat this by the spoonfuls. I thinking of trying on some sort of sandwich in place of mayo or mustard.

I agree! Guac should never be eaten beyond 24 hrs at the most.

I would try using a wooden spoon to mix though. Metal might affect coloring and taste.

Thanks - I never thought of that!

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I mash up a few avocados with a fork (I like it somewhat chunky) a little scallions or onions, minced garlic, jalapeno (if I have it), lime juice and s&p. I could eat this by the spoonfuls. I thinking of trying on some sort of sandwich in place of mayo or mustard.

Grilled chicken, ripe tomatoes, and a big pile of guac an a soft roll...or dig out the middle of a chewy roll

my avocado should be ready by tomorrow

oh yeah I use everything mentioned so far plus hot sauce and no cilantro

tracey

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What's worked best for me is covering a piece of plastic wrap with a thin film on lemon or lime juice, then pressing the plastic wrap juice-side down flush against the guacamole surface.

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Soak the avocados with the skin on in water that's maintained at about 100F for 45 min to an hour. You'll get 2-3 days out of it before it turns an unappetizing brown. The hot water denatures some of the proteins that oxidize and cause browning, I believe.

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I find that adding finely chopped crunchy bacon prevents browning - Guacamole thus adulterated has yet to last long enough for any discoloration to occur.

Really! Add the bacon. Try it. Mmmm.

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I mash up a few avocados with a fork (I like it somewhat chunky) a little scallions or onions, minced garlic, jalapeno (if I have it), lime juice and s&p. I could eat this by the spoonfuls. I thinking of trying on some sort of sandwich in place of mayo or mustard.

Your combo sounds delicious and you should DEFINITELY try it in place of your other condiments on a sandwich. I'm amazed by how many foods taste better with guac, especially almost any kind of sandwich. Try it with omelettes, too.

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I agree. Keep doing what you're doing, but you should eat it within a couple of days any way.

Maybe this is a new topic, but how do you make your guac? My husband considers in heresy to use anything but avocadoes, lime juice and s&p, but I have a friend who makes an awesome version with avocadoes, cilantro, tomato, onion, jalapeno and s&p. He pulverizes half of the mixture with a mortar and pestle, then mixes it into chunks of the rest. So it has a great chunky texture, but the flavors are well mixed. When I make it this way, though, I do add lime juice.

I think your friend's way is THE way. I always roast (blacken) the roma tomatoes and let them cool first. Improves the flavor. Many restaurants make it at your table!

John S.

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Why bother saving guacamole?  It's so easy to make only as much as you want to eat in one sitting.

Same sentiment here - my guac mash up contains haas avo, diced white onion, minced serrano (tasted first to seee how hot it is), diced tomato, cilantro, s & p, and a bit of lime juice.

And there's never any left over!

Edited by weinoo (log)

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Well, if you're making it to spread on sandwiches, you might not want a whole avocado's worth of guacamole on one sandwich! Though it should be easy to eat enough guacamole-laced sandwiches over two days, before the worst of the discoloration sets in. :wink:

Of course, if you're putting it on sandwiches, it probably doesn't matter what colour it is, either. I've never found the discoloration to affect the flavour, though I don't have very much experience with guacamole that's past its prime.

Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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If you use a non-reactive container, and place a peice of plastic wrap directly on the guac, and another layer of plastic wrap over the container, it should keep you in good stead for a couple of days.

Another poster mentioned using just-starting-to-color guac on sandwiches, and that is what we did at a restaurant I worked in. The super fresh stuff got served where the customer could see it, and the no-so-super-fresh stuff got put into sandwiches.

-Sounds awfully rich!

-It is! That's why I serve it with ice cream to cut the sweetness!

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I add in some red onion, jalapeno pepper, maybe some cilantro and a bit of garlic. salt. pepper. also, a bit of cayanne pepper and some cumin. And then lime juice. I'll then transfer it to a serving container and put plastic wrap directly in contact with the guac until I'm actually ready to eat it. (which may not be for an hour or so)

Even with the lime juice, it eventually turns brown after sitting out for a few hours. I'll have to give bryanz's trick a try next time. I wonder is this is what gets done in a restaurant like Chipotle? I know they make it fresh several tiems a day.. But I would imagine even then, it must sit a few hours between re-freshes. I've also seen local grocery stores sell it in their fresh bulk sections (with olives and salsas and the like). I've never seen it brown. Maybe they add some sort of color preservative??

Edited by jsmeeker (log)

Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"

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Most commercial places do add the vitamin c, as mentioned above.

Supposedly, it also helps to keep the pits and put them in the container when you save it. Then definitely the plastic wrap on the surface of the guac.

I've got about sixteen different ways I make guacamole. I started out with the recipe from Rick Bayless's cookbook... But tweaked it. I started adding a bunch of garlic to the tomatoes, onion, jalapeno, cilantro and lime juice.

Most recently I've been super lazy and buying salsa verde and just mixing it with the avocado. It's actually really tasty. You get that great acidity of the tomatillos. Depending on the salsa, I'll add a little lime juice and salt. Always salt. This way, also, I just make one avocado and it usually ends up being dinner.

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Why bother saving guacamole?  It's so easy to make only as much as you want to eat in one sitting.

Well, if you're making it to spread on sandwiches, you might not want a whole avocado's worth of guacamole on one sandwich! Though it should be easy to eat enough guacamole-laced sandwiches over two days, before the worst of the discoloration sets in.

I have a couple of thoughts here...

First, is that you can easily make half an avacado's worth of guacamole, wrap the half with the pit tightly in cling wrap and have minimal discoloration for a day or two. Even if there is light discoloration, you can simply cut that part off before you use the rest of the avodcado. Even the tightest-wrapped guacamole will discolor and deteriorate because of all the oxygen and inevitable bacteria, etc. that were introduced when the avodado was cut up and mixed with a bunch of other stuff.

Second, if you're making a sandwich, why not simply cut a few slices of avocado, add a few thin slices of onion, a few sprigs of cilantro, whatever instead of making up guacamole? It's a lot less likely to come squirting out the sides of the sandwich when you bite into it.

--

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Thanks for all the responses. When making it for myself, there are no leftovers. However, last month we had a small 80th birthday party for my father and I made way too much. I was able to keep it for a few days doing the "plastic wrap directly on the guac" and when it discolored, I just scooped that portion away.

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Why bother saving guacamole?  It's so easy to make only as much as you want to eat in one sitting.

Well, if you're making it to spread on sandwiches, you might not want a whole avocado's worth of guacamole on one sandwich! Though it should be easy to eat enough guacamole-laced sandwiches over two days, before the worst of the discoloration sets in.

I have a couple of thoughts here...

First, is that you can easily make half an avacado's worth of guacamole, wrap the half with the pit tightly in cling wrap and have minimal discoloration for a day or two. Even if there is light discoloration, you can simply cut that part off before you use the rest of the avodcado. Even the tightest-wrapped guacamole will discolor and deteriorate because of all the oxygen and inevitable bacteria, etc. that were introduced when the avodado was cut up and mixed with a bunch of other stuff.

Second, if you're making a sandwich, why not simply cut a few slices of avocado, add a few thin slices of onion, a few sprigs of cilantro, whatever instead of making up guacamole? It's a lot less likely to come squirting out the sides of the sandwich when you bite into it.

Both good points!

Actually, I was just speculating as to why the OP might be asking for tips on preventing guacamole from discolouring, in light of her (I'm assuming KARENR65 is a "she") comment about trying it in place of mayo on sandwiches. Turns out I was wrong anyway...

Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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Anyone have any input on FoodSavers and guacamole?

So we finish the eighteenth and he's gonna stiff me. And I say, "Hey, Lama, hey, how about a little something, you know, for the effort, you know." And he says, "Oh, uh, there won't be any money. But when you die, on your deathbed, you will receive total consciousness."

So I got that goin' for me, which is nice.

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