Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

eG Foodblog: Peter the eater - Nova Scotia Eats


Recommended Posts

Checking in late while I lunch at my desk...

Where to start - how about my kitchen?

I don’t think I will bother with the traditional image of my fridge’s innards – it wouldn’t be very interesting anyways, mostly unlabelled containers and bags of whole milk (did I mention I have twins?) plus a dizzying array of condiments. It is also undersized and undercleaned; I think a new one is pretty high on our list of major appliance new purchases.  We have a chest freezer in the basement, also not very photogenic. Having just looked, I can say that it has inside several small whole chickens, a pork shoulder, bags of wild blueberries we picked last August, some raspberries from our garden, a whole salmon, and possibly some popsicles. And some of those blue cold packs in various sizes – the ones you take in your cooler when going on a picnic. I am sure there’s more stuff down there that needs to be chiseled away from the icy freezer walls. Sometimes there is venison from friends who hunt or mackerel when they are running in our bay (I’ll talk about that later).

Objection, Your Honor!

There is no such thing as an unphotogenic refrigerator. Like one's desk, it's a window to the soul. Your fridge -- and your desk -- can't be messier or more haphazardly arranged than my own, and there are photos of both in my first foodblog. It's your call, but I implore you to honor the tradition.

But while we're on the subject of soul, your kitchen has a lot of it, judging from the photos you did provide.

Here’s a context shot:

gallery_28661_4647_51019.jpg

[...]Here’s a closer shot of the pantry shelf contents:

gallery_28661_4647_21112.jpg

Moving right along:

That object hanging on the right side of the shelves is a giant iron ladle. It tends to collect car keys and loose change. I have a thing for over-sized kitchen equipment; it’s a borderline Claes Oldenburg fetish, really. He’s that Swedish (?) sculptor famous for crazy stuff like the 50 foot spoon and bus-sized jackknife. It is inherently amusing to me when a familiar object is absurdly large, I cannot explain it. Maybe that’s a whole new thread I should start, if someone hasn’t already!

I've filed this for the "Must Include in My Third Foodblog" file.

Philadelphia is home to two Oldenburg sculptures. One of them, directly across from Philadelphia City Hall, is the best-known outdoor meeting place in the city, "the Clothespin," which also marks the entrance to the central subway and regional rail stations. (I've been told that the name the sculptor gave this work is "The Kiss.")

The other one is a huge broken button in front of the main library at the University of Pennsylvania.

We have a good weekend market downtown; like many it has a nice “crunchy granola” vibe meaning lots of organics and ecologically sound food and art. It’s not as big as it could be but that has more to do with the venue than popularity I think. The vendors are set up inside an old brewery and spread throughout like rabbits in a warren. We don’t get there as much as we’d like, but I’m bloggin’ this week so look out! It should make for a few good images anyways. This part is for my newly discovered eG neighbor Shaya:

gallery_28661_4647_33026.jpg

gallery_28661_4647_61492.jpg

gallery_28661_4647_31221.jpg

I know that you are in Acadia, but I don't think I've seen a more British streetscape anywhere in North America. That market, small though it may be, looks absolutely charming.

Good local cheese made the old world way:

gallery_28661_4647_14157.jpg

So tell me a little about Dragon's Breath Blue. What's its taste? Raw milk, I assume?

Everything looks wonderful. You say in a later post that you are learning food photography; I'd say you have already mastered the fundamentals.

I noticed that the dulse was identified as a "Product of Atlantic Canada." I have heard that when the Quebecois repeatedly threatened to split Canada in two, there were people in the Atlantic provinces who thought that eastern Canada should either go it alone or join the United States. Was that sentiment at all widespread? Is it still alive, now that it looks like Quebec separatism is in retreat?

Hi Peter:

I'm loving your blog.  I'm originally from New Hampshire where poutine (french fry/gravy kind) is very popular.  I miss the Northeast!

Live Free or Die!

I think that New Hampshire has a larger concentration of French-Canadian descendants than any other US state (a fact that cost Edmund Muskie of next-door Maine dearly in 1968), so I'm not surprised to hear that poutine is popular there. I guess I didn't know where to look for it on my regular forays to Manchester in 1980.

Edited to add: Blog on, Peter; you're doing a fantastic job so far!

Edited by MarketStEl (log)

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As promised here are some shots from Pete's Frootique. It's food retail at its best and a great place to poke around and plan menus. I picked up some goodies to prepare later this week. . .

fiddleheads (today down to $3.99/lb)

[gallery_28661_4647_41407.jpg

more greens:

gallery_28661_4647_16279.jpg

nuts, dried stuff, etc.

gallery_28661_4647_5589.jpg

dried, smoked, cured meats:

gallery_28661_4647_38493.jpg

lots of European chesses, a couple are local:

gallery_28661_4647_21134.jpg

more cheese:

gallery_28661_4647_31968.jpg

frozen boar, emu, venison, duck, bison, etc:

gallery_28661_4647_82115.jpg

fresh sausage made on premises:

gallery_28661_4647_20859.jpg

rolled up stuff, haven't had, looks good:

gallery_28661_4647_51894.jpg

lots of fresh red meat:

gallery_28661_4647_8320.jpg

note the Nova Scotia jumbo squid:

gallery_28661_4647_49853.jpg

ribbit, ribbit:

gallery_28661_4647_29737.jpg

red snapper looks good:

gallery_28661_4647_39602.jpg

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So tell me a little about Dragon's Breath Blue. What's its taste? Raw milk, I assume?

Gabrielle Bright, The Canadian Living Test Kitchen says it well:

Described as a little brother to Stilton, Roquefort and gorgonzola, this black wax-covered cheese develops mould around the sides (stirring it up and waiting a couple of days help activate it even more). We loved its creamy yet chalky texture and mild blue flavour, but it sure does stink (hence the name).

I noticed that the dulse was identified as a "Product of Atlantic Canada." I have heard that when the Quebecois repeatedly threatened to split Canada in two, there were people in the Atlantic provinces who thought that eastern Canada should either go it alone or join the United States. Was that sentiment at all widespread? Is it still alive, now that it looks like Quebec separatism is in retreat?

Politics, eh? No comment. I'll just say this:

Nova Scotia + New Brunswick + Prince Edward Island = The Maritimes

The Maritimes + Newfoundland = Atlantic Canada

Atlantic Canada + Quebec + The Rest = Canada

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Peter, I noticed that prices are given by the pound, not the kilogram(me) in the supermarket. Is that a regional thing? I seem to remember that in Quebec and points west, the metric system is used pretty much exclusively.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

note the Nova Scotia jumbo squid:

gallery_28661_4647_49853.jpg

ribbit, ribbit:

gallery_28661_4647_29737.jpg

Good heavens. The prices on the shrimp and crawfish blew me away. I know the crawfish isn't local, but are there no local shrimp as well?

Around here, the crawfish, cooked, are $1.29-2.99 per lb and that size of cooked shrimp would run maybe $6-7 per lb.

At those prices, it is no wonder you went with the monkfish.

Preach not to others what they should eat, but eat as becomes you and be silent. Epicetus

Amanda Newton

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Peter, I noticed that prices are given by the pound, not the kilogram(me) in the supermarket. Is that a regional thing? I seem to remember that in Quebec and points west, the metric system is used pretty much exclusively.

It's not a regional thing, it's just a stupid thing - it drives me crazy! I often see stuff at both major grocery stores here priced by the pound but the scale nearby is metric. And vice versa, I would provide a picture but I have been forbidden to take photos. I can do the math, but we all have a breaking point.

I am proud that we live in a country with two official languages, but we are supposed to be metric. I like the Imperial system just as much, I just resent being offered a price in one and a scale in the other. If I wasn't so lazy I'd write a letter.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good heavens. The prices on the shrimp and crawfish blew me away. I know the crawfish isn't local, but are there no local shrimp as well?

Around here, the crawfish, cooked, are $1.29-2.99 per lb and that size of cooked shrimp would run maybe $6-7 per lb.

At those prices, it is no wonder you went with the monkfish.

I'm glad you saw that. I honestly don't know how the shrimp market works around here, but whenever I get the frozen bag it says:

cultivated cooked shrimp

product of: Thailand, Vietnam, China, India, Indonesia

By the way what's a crawfish?

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Peter, talk about feeding yourself and the kids during the day.  Breakfast, lunch and snacks.

Susan, that is a good question because at this stage every week seems to be different. I stopped worrying about individual meals and started asking "has it been a good food day or week?" My guys who are almost two years are total mimics, so if I sit down with them and make sounds of joy as I eat the oatmeal they will usually follow suit.

So we had some pasta and cheese together for lunch the other day:

gallery_28661_4647_46280.jpg

gallery_28661_4647_53516.jpg

gallery_28661_4647_11802.jpg

gallery_28661_4647_27115.jpg

gallery_28661_4647_31419.jpg

gallery_28661_4647_48780.jpg

gallery_28661_4647_3392.jpg

We also made some BBLT's - back bacon lettuce and tomato sandwiches.

Also known as CBLT's - Canadian bacon lettuce and tomato sandwiches -

either way worthy of a national title.

gallery_28661_4647_54920.jpg

gallery_28661_4647_72468.jpg

Snacks are usually around 10:30 am and 3 pm. Any kind of fruit, juicy or dried, are very popular. We try to have real raisin toast with imaginary tea in the afternoon. My modus operandi is to offer good stuff to them, pretend to eat it with them, and when they don't, I do so undetected.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another kid fave is chicken strips.

This is thigh strips in egg and whole wheat flour:

gallery_28661_4647_6499.jpg

gallery_28661_4647_15660.jpg

And they're just now liking local pickled herring and blue cheese:

gallery_28661_4647_27686.jpg

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pickled herring, right?

How'd it get the name "Solomon Gundy"?

Isn't that a Mother Goose rhyme? ("Solomon Gundy, born on a Monday...")

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am loving this blog. My gr-grandparents were from Halifax (my gr-grandfather was president of the college there) and we keep talking about going for a long weekend to visit some of the sights.

I'm curious about the cultural influences in your area. Is it mostly Scottish/English? I ask because it looks like my family migrated to NS from Scotland and England (the Brits via Boston -- um, some of my ancestors weren't very revolutionary) and I don't see many French names in the family tree.

Diana Burrell, freelance writer/author

The Renegade Writer's Query Letters That Rock (Marion Street Press, Nov. 2006)

DianaCooks.com

My eGullet blog

The Renegade Writer Blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think the Acadian poutine is different.  I might have asked about it on eGullet before (maybe to Shaya?), but I can't remember.  My former co-worker said it was sort of like arancini, but made with mashed potatoes instead of rice, and steamed in cheesecloth.  I can't remember what usually went in the middle, though.

Does she have any good Scottish recipes you'd care to share during your blog?   :smile:

I was not aware there was a special Acadian poutine, but its such a "grassroots" food I shouldn't be surprised. The story I know is that poutine was invented somewhere near Montreal like 50 years ago. For me, classic poutine is, from the bottom of the bowl up:

1. rough cut french fries

2. fresh white cheddar cheese curds

3. thick chicken-based gravy

4. black pepper and ketchup

pretty decadent if you ask me!

Sorry to interrupt your blog.

Acadian poutine has nothing to do with the poutine from Quebec. It is generally made with a mixture of mashed potatoes and grated potatoes, often contain a piece of stewed meat. It is ball shaped, boiled and served with broth. Nothing like its Quebec fastfood cousin. You can find it on the Acadian coast of New-Brunswick but I don't think it is widely available elsewhere.

Ha! now we can get back to your blog! :biggrin:

The Acadian 'poutine' (meaning colloquially 'mess', or 'pudding (steamed)') is also known as 'rappie pie'. Again, sorry to interrupt... :smile:

"The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears, or the ocean."

--Isak Dinesen

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm curious about the cultural influences in your area. Is it mostly Scottish/English? I ask because it looks like my family migrated to NS from Scotland and England (the Brits via Boston -- um, some of my ancestors weren't very revolutionary) and I don't see many French names in the family tree.

(Sorry to butt in here, but years of junior high school history classes are aching to be put to use, finally!)

Nova Scotia is latin for New Scotland; owing to a number of Scottish settlers who began and continued to immigrate to various parts of Nova Scotia beginning in the 17th century, probably because they found they weather more temperate (ha ha, I kid, I kid). Fewer than 5% of the population in Nova Scotia is Francophone Acadian. We have our own tartan, and are the only province to have been created by a royal charter. (Take that, Ontario!) I'd say more people consider our background to be Scots/English than French.

Nova Scotia has mixed roots. Although there has been a lot of discussion about Acadia in this thread, in fact Halifax was a British garrison town, founded in 1749. It was founded to counterbalance the French fort at Louisburg, in Cape Breton (The large island in the eastern part of Nova Scotia). The Treaty of Utrecht ceded much of Nova Scotia and what is today New Brunswick (Acadia) to England in 1713. The French got to keep Prince Edward Island (Ile St-Jean) and Cape Breton (Ile Royale), where they built Louisburg in 1719.

The English asked the Acadians to swear allegiance in 1730, but later got nervous about the whole affair and shipped them off in the 1750s, most notably to Louisiana. Later, some of them came back, but were given the (relatively) crappier land along the Fundy Bay, the southern tip of Nova Scotia, and on the south and northern coasts of Cape Breton. They didn't get to go back to the middle bits, where all of the lovely arable lands lies, and where you can visit a statue of Evangeline, if you happen to find yourself in Wolfville for the Apple Blossom festival, or touring the local wineries there. Try the coffee at Just Us! Roasters down the road: it's really great.

Halifax has an English colonial history, and not a particularly notable place to taste poutine; Poutine is of course a Quebecois invention, and the Quebecois are culturally separate from the Acadians. I can't comment on Acadian poutine rapee, although I have gone on record about my feelings for rappie pie, a true Acadian dish.

How Acadian food evolved into Cajun food is another question entirely.

Now that I've thought about it a bit, I can't think of a particular dish strongly associated with Halifax. Donairs, perhaps?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Acadian 'poutine' (meaning colloquially 'mess', or 'pudding (steamed)') is also known as 'rappie pie'. Again, sorry to interrupt...  :smile:

Actually, the two seems related but they still differ slightly:

Poutine rapée (acadian poutine) is a different concoction... it is ball shapped and boiled or steamed. Rapie pie (rapure), although made in a similar way, is baked and is pie shaped. Rappie pie is mostly found in Nova Scotia while poutine rapée is mostly found around Moncton and toward the Acadian peninsule.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nova Scotia is latin for New Scotland; owing to a number of Scottish settlers who . . .

nakji, thanks for the historical synopsis. Halifax is a port city so there are lots of new Canadians, and its a college town so there are lots of international students.

I'd add that today the second most spoken language in Halifax is Arabic. There are thriving Lebanese and Greek communities here and its easy to find food associated with those cultures.

Now that I've thought about it a bit, I can't think of a particular dish strongly associated with Halifax. Donairs, perhaps?

I plan on getting a donair (aka gyro) for blog purposes but like poutine (aka disco fries) it helps to have the right conditions - after midnight, busy street scene, elevated blood alcohol, etc.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pickled herring, right?

How'd it get the name "Solomon Gundy"?

Isn't that a Mother Goose rhyme?  ("Solomon Gundy, born on a Monday...")

Yes it is pickled herring, with some onion and spices. The story I know is that the name comes from salamagundi which is an old English style of salad with all kinds of stuff in it, including fish.

Solomon-a-Gundy is mackerel and shad boiled together, from Jamaica.

Solomon Grundy with an r is a Victorian English nursery rhyme:

Solomon Grundy,

Born on a Monday,

Christened on Tuesday,

Married on Wednesday,

Took ill on Thursday,

Grew worse on Friday,

Died on Saturday,

Buried on Sunday.

That was the end of

Solomon Grundy.

Solomon Grundy is also a bad guy zombie in the comic books.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That chunk of monkfish looked like part of a human anatomy model.  :blink:  The way you smoked is very intriguing though.

Yes, the monkfish looked like the aftermath of whatever-ectomy operation. Tastes great though, especially if all you see is a juicy medallion on your plate. The wood added a tiny bit of smokiness and colour, but nowhere near that of a hot or cold smoked fillet. Cleanup was real easy too!

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lobsters!

For the few who don’t recognize this creature:

gallery_28661_4647_50929.jpg

gallery_28661_4647_36247.jpg

It’s a young lobster (Homarus americanus) weighing in at 325 grams which is almost 12 ounces or ¾ pound. They are cold water crustaceans and extremely delicious. The rubber bands are on the claws to protect other lobsters in the tank and to a lesser extent me (I did see a bigger one snap a pencil in half once). The bigger claw is the crusher and the other is the pincher. Somebody near here once caught a 45-pounder which I believe is the word record.

I put him head first into an inch of boiling water for a quick kill then let him steam for 15-20 minutes. That’s it, pink and delicious! Some like them cold – an easy way to go when you’re cooking up a few dozen. Melted garlic butter is mandatory:

gallery_28661_4647_6362.jpg

gallery_28661_4647_16983.jpg

This guy is missing 3 ½ of his walking legs (amazingly, they can regrow them):

gallery_28661_4647_15207.jpg

gallery_28661_4647_68593.jpg

So you twist off the tail and snip up the centre of the underside, the tail meat should come out in one piece. Crack the claws and work the juicy white meat out. The green stuff (aka tomalley) is the liver equivalent and it is one of the best tasting parts, to me anyways. Like other creatures it also tends to be a place for toxins to accumulate so some skip it. I mix it with some of the garlic butter and smear it on a bun.

gallery_28661_4647_68949.jpg

gallery_28661_4647_25821.jpg

In order to grow they must molt. Most adults replace their entire shell every few months depending on a number of factors. This guy was likely preparing to molt since the meat was tightly packed inside a very hard shell. If you are lucky you might get a female with tens of thousands of flavorful eggs. The males are generally bigger but I can’t tell gender without seeing the eggs inside. There is a way; some kind of tiny anatomical thingy that I can never find.

After processing, I got around 120 grams of edible flesh and 150 grams of shell, etc. That’s 325 – 120 – 150 = 55 grams still in the pot.

gallery_28661_4647_48964.jpg

gallery_28661_4647_22996.jpg

So I put the shell bits back in and simmer the whole lot for lobster stock. That’s one of the reasons I don’t boil the lobster; way too much water to reduce into a flavorful broth. I’m going to add the stock to sautéed onions, then add frozen shrimp, sole and corn (celery, carrot, potato etc. to follow).

gallery_28661_4647_70616.jpg

gallery_28661_4647_54093.jpg

Here’s lobster served with some sliced beef, bib lettuce, Vidalia onion, and a Chianti.

gallery_28661_4647_59005.jpg

And a big glass of the chowder.

gallery_28661_4647_10429.jpg

gallery_28661_4647_21382.jpg

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On Mother's Day weekend, most of the grocery store chains in this area, had the canners on special for 5.99 each. I so wanted to buy some, but I was working all weekend and after coming home from work( where I cook), cooking is the last thing I want to do.

Yours look delicious.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why is it called a canner?

Canners or "shack" lobsters are too small to be legally exported as live whole lobsters, so they wind up at the roadside shack for local consumption or they get canned. Apparently Canada exports 90% of the lobster catch.

Mid-range lobsters re sometimes called "chickens" and the bigger ones around 5 lbs are "jumbo". Most people like them between 1 and 2 lbs.

Rules are a bit different in the USA for max. and min. legal sizes but both countries go by carapace length - from eye socket to start of tail. A female with a 5" carapace would be considered a big egg-layer and therefore goes back into the ocean. Here I think the min. carapace is 63.5 mm (2.5 inches)

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By Duvel
      The first week of November are „autumn holidays“ in the area where I live. We wanted to use that time to go to Paris, but when my parents-in-law somewhat surprisingly announced they‘d be coming over from Spain for the whole of November, we scrapped that idea and looked for something more German …
       
      So … Berlin. Not the best time to travel (cold & rainy), but with a couple of museums for the little one and the slightly older ones to enjoy together, plus some food options I was looking forward it was a destination we could all agree on. The Covid19 warnings in the Berlin subway support that notion …
       

       
    • By liuzhou
      Note: This follows on from the Munching with the Miao topic.
       
      The three-hour journey north from Miao territory ended up taking four, as the driver missed a turning and we had to drive on to the next exit and go back. But our hosts waited for us at the expressway exit and led us up a winding road to our destination - Buyang 10,000 mu tea plantation (布央万亩茶园 bù yāng wàn mǔ chá yuán) The 'mu' is  a Chinese measurement of area equal to 0.07 of a hectare, but the 10,000 figure is just another Chinese way of saying "very large".
       
      We were in Sanjiang Dong Autonomous County, where 57% of the inhabitants are Dong.
       
      The Dong people (also known as the Kam) are noted for their tea, love of glutinous rice and their carpentry and architecture. And their hospitality. They tend to live at the foot of mountains, unlike the Miao who live in the mid-levels.
       
      By the time we arrived, it was lunch time, but first we had to have a sip of the local tea. This lady did the preparation duty.
       

       

       
      This was what we call black tea, but the Chinese more sensibly call 'red tea'. There is something special about drinking tea when you can see the bush it grew on just outside the window!
       
      Then into lunch:
       

       

      Chicken Soup
       

      The ubiquitous Egg and Tomato
       

      Dried fish with soy beans and chilli peppers. Delicious.
       

      Stir fried lotus root
       

      Daikon Radish
       

      Rice Paddy Fish Deep Fried in Camellia Oil - wonderful with a smoky flavour, but they are not smoked.
       

      Out of Focus Corn and mixed vegetable
       

      Fried Beans
       

      Steamed Pumpkin
       

      Chicken
       

      Beef with Bitter Melon
       

      Glutinous (Sticky) Rice
       

      Oranges
       

      The juiciest pomelo ever. The area is known for the quality of its pomelos.
       
      After lunch we headed out to explore the tea plantation.
       

       

       

       

       
      Interspersed with the tea plants are these camellia trees, the seeds of which are used to make the Dong people's preferred cooking oil.
       

       
      As we climbed the terraces we could hear singing and then came across this group of women. They are the tea pickers. It isn't tea picking time, but they came out in their traditional costumes to welcome us with their call and response music. They do often sing when picking. They were clearly enjoying themselves.
       

       
      And here they are:
       
       
      After our serenade we headed off again, this time to the east and the most memorable meal of the trip. Coming soon.
       
       
    • By FoodMuse
      Hello everyone,
      eGullet was nice enough to invite me to write a food blog chronicling what I've made or eaten out for one week. I'm so excited about it! Thanks guys.
      About me:
      I dream about food, I wake thinking what's for dinner and I'm so excited to share it with you. I'm part of the food world in New York. By that, I just mean that I'm so fortunate enough to be invited to great events where I get to eat great food. I'm also a nerd and a part of the technology world. I produce, edit and sometimes host food related web videos and I'm also a part of the tech world.
      I'm launching a website called Please, Pass the Gravy. www.pleasepassthegravy.com We let you create a menu, invite friends and then collaborate on that menu. Never host another potluck with 8 pasta salads. You could use it now, but we're alpha launch, it works but it's ugly. It's my ugly baby. So, if you use it be kind and message me if you have improvement ideas. I thought it would be ok to write about it here because it is food related.
      I live in Brooklyn with a lovely guy who likes to eat and a small corgi mix dog. I cook pretty much every night and do a nice brunch on the weekend. I am not a crazy dog lady, but I do admit to cooking food for the dog. I have an excuse, beyond doting, he had seizures that have stopped since not feeding him dog food.
      Foods I cook:
      Spicy foods! If you look at my blog I have a simple papaya ketchup with habanero that is pretty darn good.
      I love great cheese. This may be the week for Beer Cheese Soup.
      I try to limit carbs, though I do cheat.
      In any given week C. and I probably eat cauliflower, broccoli and green beans as a side.
      Tonight's dinner will be Vietnamese inspired. We'll see how it goes. I'll post about it as soon as I can.
      Any requests? Questions? I'd love to hear from you.
      -Grace
    • By Duvel
      In these challenging times, a full summer vacation is not an easy task. For the last 1.5 years we have been mostly at home with the clear plan to visit Catalonia (or more precise my wife’s family) latest this summer. And it looked good for a while. Unfortunately, the recent rise in case numbers in Spain have resulted in …
       
      OK, let’s skip this part. Long story short - my wife and me are fully vaccinated, as are >90% of the people we care about in Catalonia. After some discussion (after all, Germans tend to prefer to be on the safe side of things) we simply fueled up the car, got each a test (for the transit through France) and started to drive …
       
      After a leisurely 11h drive we arrived at a small fishing town somewhat north of Barcelona around 3.00am. We unloaded the car and my wife an the little one went straight to bed. 
       

       


      I found an expired beer in the elsewise pretty empty fridge and enjoyed the cool breeze on the terrace. Holidays, here we come …
       

    • By liuzhou
      Last week, Liuzhou government invited a number of diplomats from Laos, Malaysia, Indonesia, Myanmar/Burma, Poland, and Germany to visit the city and prefecture. They also invited me along. We spent Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday introducing the diplomats to the culture of the local ethnic groups and especially to their food culture.
       
      First off, we headed two hours north into the mountains of Rongshui Miao Autonomous County. The Miao people (苗族 miáo zú), who include the the Hmong, live in the mid-levels of mountains and are predominantly subsistence farmers. Our first port of call was the county town, also Rongshui (融水 róng shuǐ, literal meaning: Melt Water) where we were to have lunch. But before lunch we had to go meet some people and see their local crafts. These are people I know well from my frequent work trips to the area, but for the diplomats, it was all new.
       
      So, I had to wait for lunch, and I see no reason why you shouldn't either. Here are some of the people I live and work with.


       
      This lovely young woman is wearing the traditional costume of an unmarried girl. Many young women, including her, wear this every day, but most only on festive occasions.
       
      Her hat is made from silver (and is very heavy). Here is a closer look.
       

       
      Married women dispense with those gladrags and go for this look:
       

       
      As you can see she is weaving bamboo into a lantern cover.
       
      The men tend to go for this look, although I'm not sure that the Bluetooth earpiece for his cellphone is strictly traditional.
       

       
      The children don't get spared either
       

       
      This little girl is posing with the Malaysian Consul-General.
       
      After meeting these people we went on to visit a 芦笙 (lú shēng) workshop. The lusheng is a reed wind instrument and an important element in the Miao, Dong and Yao peoples' cultures.
       

       

       
      Then at last we headed to the restaurant, but as is their custom, in homes and restaurants, guests are barred from entering until they go through the ritual of the welcoming cup of home-brewed rice wine.
       


      The consular staff from Myanmar/Burma and Malaysia "unlock" the door.
       
      Then you have the ritual hand washing part.
       

       
      Having attended to your personal hygiene, but before  entering the dining room, there is one more ritual to go through. You arrive here and sit around this fire and wok full of some mysterious liquid on the boil.
       

       
      On a nearby table is this
       

       
      Puffed rice, soy beans, peanuts and scallion. These are ladled into bowls.
       

       
      with a little salt, and then drowned in the "tea" brewing in the wok.
       
      This is  油茶 (yóu chá) or Oil Tea. The tea is made from Tea Seed Oil which is made from the seeds of the camellia bush. This dish is used as a welcoming offering to guests in homes and restaurants. Proper etiquette suggests that three cups is a minimum, but they will keep refilling your cup until you stop drinking. First time I had it I really didn't like it, but I persevered and now look forward to it.
       

      L-R: Director of the Foreign Affairs Dept of Liuzhou government, consuls-general of Malaysia, Myanmar, Laos.
       
      Having partaken of the oil tea, finally we are allowed to enter the dining room, where two tables have been laid out for our use.
       

       
      Let the eating, finally, begin.
       
      In no particular order:
       

      Steamed corn, taro and sweet potato
       

      Bamboo Shoots
       

      Duck
       

      Banana leaf stuffed with sticky rice and mixed vegetables and steamed.
       

      Egg pancake with unidentified greenery
       

      Stir fried pork and beans
       

      Stir fried Chinese banana (Ensete lasiocarpum)
       

      Pig Ears
       

       
      This may not look like much, but was the star of the trip. Rice paddy fish, deep fried in camellia tree seed oil with wild mountain herbs. We ate this at every meal, cooked with slight variations, but never tired of it.
       

      Stir fried Greens
       
      Our meal was accompanied by the wait staff singing to us and serving home-made rice wine (sweetish and made from the local sticky rice).
       
       
       
       
      Everything we ate was grown or reared within half a kilometre of the restaurant and was all free-range, organic. And utterly delicious.
       
      Roll on dinner time.
       
      On the trip I was designated the unofficial official photographer and ended up taking 1227 photographs. I just got back last night and was busy today, so I will try to post the rest of the first day (and dinner) as soon as I can.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...