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eG Foodblog: Peter the eater - Nova Scotia Eats


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Two! Two-year olds! And you find time to cook. Oh my. I've got just the one. I'm in awe. I'll be following along, just hoping some of whatever it is you've got, will rub off.

Neat spice cabinet & ladle/key-collector. Doesnt matter how big you build it, there is never enough room for the seasonings.

I had to keep reminding myself its not California - all those jars with no door or shelf-lip.

"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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Sorry to interrupt your blog.

Acadian poutine has nothing to do with the poutine from Quebec. It is generally made with a mixture of mashed potatoes and grated potatoes, often contain a piece of stewed meat. It is ball shaped, boiled and served with broth. Nothing like its Quebec fastfood cousin. You can find it on the Acadian coast of New-Brunswick but I don't think it is widely available elsewhere.

Ha! now we can get back to your blog!  :biggrin:

Brilliant! I had no idea, and neither did the search engines I tried.

I wonder what the origin of the word is . . . anybody?

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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Hi Peter,

As a Cajun born and bred in Louisiana, I'm eager to see all of Acadia that you can show us.

As a mother of two small children, I'm wondering how in the world you keep yours away from those glass canisters on the butcher block.  :shock:

I'll do my best to relate Acadie, there are some amazing places here in Nova Scotia with the food and language and (perhaps best of all) music of their ancestors.

My guys can't quite reach the lids - yet.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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Sorry to interrupt your blog.

Acadian poutine has nothing to do with the poutine from Quebec. It is generally made with a mixture of mashed potatoes and grated potatoes, often contain a piece of stewed meat. It is ball shaped, boiled and served with broth. Nothing like its Quebec fastfood cousin. You can find it on the Acadian coast of New-Brunswick but I don't think it is widely available elsewhere.

Ha! now we can get back to your blog!  :biggrin:

Brilliant! I had no idea, and neither did the search engines I tried.

I wonder what the origin of the word is . . . anybody?

Ask and ye shall receive!

According to my Dictionnaire des canadianismes, the word "poutine" comes from the English "pudding". This doesn't seem to make sense at first, until you consider that there are three food-related definitions given, and the first is "Generic term applied to a wide variety of desserts". And if you look in Anita Stewart's A Taste of Canada, there is indeed a recipe for an apple-based dessert called poutines à trou. (The other two definitions given in the dictionary are for poutines râpées, which are the Acadian dish we've been discussing, and which can be bought canned around here, and the well-known Quebecois French fry-based... uh... delicacy.)

I'd just like to add that I look forward to following your blog. I've been living in New Brunswick for a couple of years now, and Halifax has been something of an oasis of food for me during that time. I'm moving back to Ontario in a couple of weeks, but I'll be intrigued nonetheless to see your perspective on the Nova Scotia food scene.

Edited by mkayahara (log)

Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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Yay! A blogger from my hometown! (Okay, I'm technically from Dartmouth, but don't hold it against me.) Will your visit to the valley coincide with the Apple Blossom Festival? Will you be visiting Pete's Frootique? Is Pete's Frootique still a going affair? Is Ca Hoa Pan-Asian grocery still open at the corner of Queen and Victoria (the best place in Halifax IMHO for Asian groceries)?

And most importantly.....

Does Pizza Corner pizza still taste like rubber?

Blossoms are a bit late, but I am hopeful.

Just went to Pete's Frootique (no relation to me), got permission to take photos - they were very cool about it unlike other major grocers in the region.

Don't know about Ca Hoa, but will investigate. I always go to South & Henry Streets.

Pizza corner is still going strong - I'll go there for more "research".

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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Wow!  Those are beautiful photos.  When I read The Shipping News, that is what I pictured: the terrain, the water and boats, the lighthouse.  Just gorgeous.

You are fairly close to the north coast of Maine, I'm assuming?  My younger son spent a summer there at the Oceanography Institute; we fell in love with the place. 

It's too late for me to steal your "recessed spice jars" idea for my kitchen, but I'll steal it for another use.  :smile:

Hope to see some more recent photos of Griffin and Iris!

Haven't read Shipping News, but a good film shot here and in Newfoundland.

Halifax to Bangor is around 500 miles - probably less in a cigar boat. Or helicopter.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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Two! Two-year olds!  And you find time to cook. Oh my. I've got just the one. I'm in awe. I'll be following along, just hoping some of whatever it is you've got, will rub off.

Neat spice cabinet &  ladle/key-collector. Doesnt matter how big you build it, there is never enough room for the seasonings.

I had to keep reminding myself its not California - all those jars with no door or shelf-lip.

When it comes to storage space, it doesn't matter because we are all like an ideal gas - which will expand to fill the volume of its container.

Are you referring to seismic features?

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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We have a good weekend market downtown; like many it has a nice “crunchy granola” vibe meaning lots of organics and ecologically sound food and art. It’s not as big as it could be but that has more to do with the venue than popularity I think. The vendors are set up inside an old brewery and spread throughout like rabbits in a warren. We don’t get there as much as we’d like, but I’m bloggin’ this week so look out! It should make for a few good images anyways. This part is for my newly discovered eG neighbor Shaya:

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Fiddleheads baby! It’s that time of year for these awesome little ostrich ferns.

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Lots of seafood: salmon, halibut, haddock, scallops, mussels, lobster, ocean perch, and even monkfish.

I got offered and therefore ate a free sample of a raw scallop.

It was succulent and sweet, but a little heat or acid makes it even better:

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Here is a bunch of smoked and flavored salmon:

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This is dulse. Can anybody out there in eG land elaborate?

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Flowers and herbs:

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Prepared Asian foods:

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Not food but incense, it looks tasty to me:

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Good local cheese made the old world way:

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Bakery:

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Seafood chowder, quiche, and lasagna:

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Sausage samples:

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I bought some back bacon aka Canadian or peameal bacon (top right):

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More Asian treats:

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The crepe people:

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Patisserie:

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Theodore tugboat (did I mention I have twin toddlers)

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Guess I had better get cooking.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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Dulse is seaweed pried off rocks in tidal waters. Last time I tried it was from a large brown paper bag, collected in Grand Manan. It had seagull crap and little star fish attached. Salty, tasting of fish and iodine - not my taste.

My ex and his mother would eat it by the pound then sit around and let rip the most vile sulfurous emanations.

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Really enjoying this Peter. My Grandmother grew up in Halifax so I've heard lots about it, but never been.

Theodore tugboat (did I mention I have twin toddlers)

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Guess I had better get cooking.

This made my weekend! I have two sons as well (although in their teens now) and spent many mornings watching Theodore, Foduck, Emily and the Harbourmaster in The Big Harbour!

I've noticed a large influence of Asian cuisines so far in your blog. Any part of Asia in particular?

Have fun!

A.

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Dulse is seaweed pried off rocks in tidal waters.  Last time I tried it was from a large brown paper bag, collected in Grand Manan.  It had seagull crap and little star fish attached.  Salty, tasting of fish and iodine - not my taste. 

My ex and his mother would eat it by the pound then sit around and let rip the most vile sulfurous emanations.

Wow, what an unfortunate image. I don't mind chewing a bit now and then (when I crave electrolytes) but it is an acquired taste. I have never seen a recipe but have tried doing things with it like flavoring oil, making a salty purple glaze, etc. It has a good colour and definitely "resonates with a strong marine note" but its hard to work with.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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Sorry to interrupt your blog.

Acadian poutine has nothing to do with the poutine from Quebec. It is generally made with a mixture of mashed potatoes and grated potatoes, often contain a piece of stewed meat. It is ball shaped, boiled and served with broth. Nothing like its Quebec fastfood cousin. You can find it on the Acadian coast of New-Brunswick but I don't think it is widely available elsewhere.

Ha! now we can get back to your blog!  :biggrin:

Brilliant! I had no idea, and neither did the search engines I tried.

I wonder what the origin of the word is . . . anybody?

Ask and ye shall receive!

According to my Dictionnaire des canadianismes, the word "poutine" comes from the English "pudding". This doesn't seem to make sense at first, until you consider that there are three food-related definitions given, and the first is "Generic term applied to a wide variety of desserts". And if you look in Anita Stewart's A Taste of Canada, there is indeed a recipe for an apple-based dessert called poutines à trou. (The other two definitions given in the dictionary are for poutines râpées, which are the Acadian dish we've been discussing, and which can be bought canned around here, and the well-known Quebecois French fry-based... uh... delicacy.)

I'd just like to add that I look forward to following your blog. I've been living in New Brunswick for a couple of years now, and Halifax has been something of an oasis of food for me during that time. I'm moving back to Ontario in a couple of weeks, but I'll be intrigued nonetheless to see your perspective on the Nova Scotia food scene.

When you think about it, poutine râpée is a kind of pudding: a ball of dough cooked in a liquid. But I would like to add that the word poutine was used by some people in Quebec to describe weird mixtures before the creation of the Quebec fast food dish. My guess is that the Acadian use of the word predate the more widely known Quebec poutine... the meaning probably got lost between the Acadian peninsula in New Brunswick and the Bois Franc region in Quebec. The funny thing about poutine is that I have seen some interesting regional adaptation including a lobster poutine in the Gaspe Peninsula... After all that talk on poutine, maybe Peter will create his own local version... :laugh:

Edited by Magictofu (log)
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Peter, Happy Victoria Day.  It's great to see a Canadian blogging - and from a place I've never been. 

Big question:  Did you eat anything today?  :biggrin:

I think the old bird (Queen Victoria) would have been 188 this week. We had some Earl Grey tea with scones but I forgot to take pictures.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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Those are awesome photos of the farmer's market. They are indeed bursting at the seams. There is talk of moving to a larger, more permanent venue; I personally am rooting for the move.

Yay! A blogger from my hometown! (Okay, I'm technically from Dartmouth, but don't hold it against me.) Will your visit to the valley coincide with the Apple Blossom Festival? Will you be visiting Pete's Frootique? Is Pete's Frootique still a going affair? Is Ca Hoa Pan-Asian grocery still open at the corner of Queen and Victoria (the best place in Halifax IMHO for Asian groceries)?

And most importantly.....

Does Pizza Corner pizza still taste like rubber?

Blossoms are a bit late, but I am hopeful.

Just went to Pete's Frootique (no relation to me), got permission to take photos - they were very cool about it unlike other major grocers in the region.

Don't know about Ca Hoa, but will investigate. I always go to South & Henry Streets.

Pizza corner is still going strong - I'll go there for more "research".

Pete's Frootique has always been a very motivating place to shop. I recently heard that they had been bought by a large grocery chain, but I have yet to have this confirmed. On my latest visits I have noticed a big change, though. The produce did not seem to have the same appeal, there was no sign of Pete anywhere - he is usually seen on the floor handling the produce, and most importantly, the piano player wasn't at his perch. Have you heard anything about this?

Pizza corner pizza is great for what it is; late-night or sunny afternoons when you need a quick bite and want to people-watch. It gives the city a lot of character. I take my kids down there during the summer and we sit up in the tall stools in front of the open window and feel the sun on our faces.

As for Ca Hoa, they are still going strong, both on the retail and wholesale side.

Peter, curious, how do you eat as a family? Do you cook separate meals for the kids? Do you eat at the same time as they do or do you opt for a more peaceful mealtime after they are snug in their beds? Do you go out for meals with the kids?

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Pete's Frootique is a real store?!?!?!?!? I always thought it was just a segment on Midday! I remember watching it whenever I went home for lunch in jr. high or high school. Now I have to go to Nova Scotia so I can visit Pete's Frootique!

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Wow, now that's a market, Peter! I find myself incredibly hungry after that tour. The smoked items are especially inviting.

a couple observations:

I've also seen lots of Dulce here in Maine. They come in chewable bites and flakes in a shaker from Maine Coast Sea Vegatables in Frenchman's Bay. Apparently, the flakes are sprinkled on food instead of salt. They also have an applewood-smoked version.

I noticed the fiddleheads are kept in water at the market. They are always displayed for sale dry here in Maine. Seems like a good idea as I end up washing them for a long time when I get them home.

Blossoms are exploding here now that we have a warming sun - you should see that this week too. I'm enjoying your blog and thanks for the fishery update! :smile:

"I took the habit of asking Pierre to bring me whatever looks good today and he would bring out the most wonderful things," - bleudauvergne

foodblogs: Dining Downeast I - Dining Downeast II

Portland Food Map.com

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Pete's Frootique is a real store?!?!?!?!?  I always thought it was just a segment on Midday!  I remember watching it whenever I went home for lunch in jr. high or high school.  Now I have to go to Nova Scotia so I can visit Pete's Frootique!

Indeed it is. I remember those segments on Midday with Tina and Brent, I think Pete was at his store in Saint John NB.

He now has a store in Dartmouth (across the Harbour) and one in the downtown of Halifax. I took a bunch of shots the other day which I will post ASAP.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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I have never seen a recipe but have tried doing things with it like flavoring oil, making a salty purple glaze, etc. It has a good colour and definitely "resonates with a strong marine note" but its hard to work with.

Hi Peter:

I'm loving your blog. I'm originally from New Hampshire where poutine (french fry/gravy kind) is very popular. I miss the Northeast!

Dulse is delicious if prepared properly. It should be thoroughly rinsed to remove seagull droppings and starfish (if present). Wring out as much water as you can, then spread on a lightly oiled baking sheet. Bake at a low temperature until most of the moisture has evaporated. Remove from the oven, top lightly with a mild, grated cheese, then run under the broiler to melt the cheese. Watch carefully, as it will go from golden-brown to burnt in a nanosecond. (If the dulse has burned, just throw it out, as there is no hope for it).

The result is like a chewy, ocean-flavored nacho chip, and quite delicious. The dulse flakes are also a very tasty addition to potato salad.

Edited by kbjesq (log)
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We boiled the fiddleheads for ten minutes then served them with garlic butter, new potatoes and chicken+cauliflower from the gas grill. Ten minutes may seem like a lot but I say better safe than sorry (bacteria) plus the kids like them a little softer.

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Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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Wow, a blog from my hometown! What a treat! At least I'm in the area, now (New Brunswick) so I'm not as homesick as I might otherwise be.

Two of the vendors in your Brewery Market shots are among my very favourites: "That Dutchman" (used to be "That Damn Dutchman," but he toned it down) makes raw-milk Gouda and Edam cheeses...the real thing. Not to be missed, but I'd maybe hold off a couple of years before I fed it to the kids. Just in case. The bakery, Boulangerie la Vendeenne (sp?) is absolutely amazing. The owner is a classically-trained boulanger from France, and the breads there are some of the best I've ever had.

I wouldn't panic if Pete isn't around the store for a little while. He's a pretty hands-on guy, right enough, but he also travels a lot. And yes, Prasantrin, he's a real person...exactly the person you see on TV, in fact. Not one of those guys who puts on a face for the camera. You could walk into his store any day, pick an item, and say to Pete "Tell me about this one" and get the full-tilt rave, just like on TV. I took my kids in there one day, when they were small (8 and 4, maybe?) and he cheerfully took them on the big tour all around the store. Very personable guy, with twice the energy of most people twenty years younger.

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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Peter, it's great to see you blogging. I have been to Halifax and area many times, most recently this past Easter as we now have family there. I did all my shopping at Pete's Frootique, it is just so much better than the grocery stores there.

I purchased a Nova Scotia cheese while there by the name of Dragons Breath that was just wonderful.....I got it at Pete's as well.

Barbara Laidlaw aka "Jake"

Good friends help you move, real friends help you move bodies.

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