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Megan Blocker

Aligot

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The aligot at La Maison de la Lozère in Paris (totally unrelated to the one in Montpellier) is, IMO, the best one can have in Paris, as is anything they serve with it. Booking is mandatory.

It's kind of a strange setup: they are only open from 19:30 to 22:00, and as far as I could tell, they don't turn over tables. We showed up right when they opened, without a reservation, and during the night, no one who sat down left and was replaced ... so, just one cover per table. They serve the aligot family-style: one bowl per table. If you finish it, they'll bring more :cool:

I've read about a place in the 6th (?) that also has aligot, but wasn't able to track it down in time.


Edited by jmhayes (log)

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I feel like it's now the right season to start thinking about making this. Maybe I'll do it for a November dinner party...


"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

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So Megan, did you ever make that aligot?

How easy is it to get this right at home? And where can I find tomme blanche/fraiche? I've heard one can get frozen aligot at Picard. Should I try that first so I know what it's supposed to taste like? Or should I go to the Maison de la Lozere?

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Pennylane,

Aligot is an easy recipe.

Tomme blanche may be found in any shop selling "produits d'Auvergne" (a quick Internet search should do it for Paris) or at any good fromager.

The frozen aligot sold by Picard is quite acceptable.

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Or should I go to the Maison de la Lozere?

Why do you have to choose? :cool:

Well I do really want to go to the Maison de la Lozere, but I'd have to drag my husband along or find someone else to go with me, and that could be weird because I'm vegetarian, so I'd have to try to get away with ordering just appetisers and stuff. Obviously I'm used to this kind of situation by now but it'd be kind of embarrassing to be the one insisting to go to a place and then not even be able to eat anything there...

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Since aligot weather is fast approaching, I made some yesterday.  Here's my first attempt.  All suggestions welcomed!

Looks like a great first attempt. What a treat to be able to find the right cheese. When I made aligot (a bastardized version of course - not having the right cheese), I found that after I added the cheese (I used a very young white cheddar cheese curd) that it didn't start to get stringy until I heated it a little more. And heaven forbid I beat it with a bamboo spoon instead of a wooden spoon.

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Since aligot weather is fast approaching, I made some yesterday.  Here's my first attempt.  All suggestions welcomed!

Looks like a great first attempt. What a treat to be able to find the right cheese. When I made aligot (a bastardized version of course - not having the right cheese), I found that after I added the cheese (I used a very young white cheddar cheese curd) that it didn't start to get stringy until I heated it a little more. And heaven forbid I beat it with a bamboo spoon instead of a wooden spoon.

Still NOT the right cheese. Plus stirring the Aligot is man's work & I'm not being chauvinistic; its the tradition because of the hard work.

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