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Kool-Aid Pickles!


GlorifiedRice
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Wow. :shock: With all of the creative, ingenius culinary minds here I would have thought there would be an onslaught of suggestions on how to best enhance the "Koolickle" experience. A blogger fascinated with the same subject matter even suggested that the instant breakfast beverage, Tang, might be a suitable alternative to the Kool-Aid. :blink:

Any suggestions for the appropriate ice cream to pair with these day glo treats? Häagen-Dazs Vanilla Swiss Almond to accompany the cherry flavored ones perhaps? :raz:

Inside me there is a thin woman screaming to get out, but I can usually keep the Bitch quiet: with CHOCOLATE!!!

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Diva? I already am "Brewing" 2 jars!

Cherry and Lemon Lime. In two weeks Ill let ya all know!

I made em with Claussens.

OH......... MY............ GAWD! :shock: I can't wait to see the "fruits" of your labor. :smile: I have another flavor combo suggestion: grape Kool-Aid mixed with lemonade Kool-Aid, in tribute to a childhood favorite, grape Kool-Aid with lemon slices. And please don't forget photos of the finished products and perhaps one of you actually eating a Koolickle. :wink:

Edited by divalasvegas (log)

Inside me there is a thin woman screaming to get out, but I can usually keep the Bitch quiet: with CHOCOLATE!!!

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They sort of remind me of those red-apple slices from the southern American cooking canon - you don't see them too much anymore, but they are round cored apple slices (gosh, are they pickled? :shock: maybe, or maybe just poached) which are then set in a marinade that includes red-hots cinnamon candies (or so I seem to remember, but all this is just vague memory so I do hope someone jumps in here to add some intelligence :biggrin: ) that makes them bright red when finished. Served as a side, sort of like a pickle.

What does all this have to do with Kool-Aid pickles? Hmmm. I'm just thinking that in addition to the Kool-Aid in the recipe, maybe some sorts of candies like red-hots could be added too, for extra savor. :wink:

The only one I can think of at the moment is lemon drops, but then I don't hang around the candy counter too much so I have a lack of candy ideas to choose from in my mind. :sad:

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They sort of remind me of those red-apple slices from the southern American cooking canon - you don't see them too much anymore, but they are round cored apple slices (gosh, are they pickled?  :shock: maybe, or maybe just poached) which are then set in a marinade that includes red-hots cinnamon candies (or so I seem to remember, but all this is just vague memory so I do hope someone jumps in here to add some intelligence  :biggrin: ) that makes them bright red when finished. Served as a side, sort of like a pickle.

My grandmother didn't make those red apple rings, but she did use red hots to sweeten and flavor her apple butter, so red hots might well have played a role. The apple butter was not, in the end, bright red, but instead a very subtle red, and certainly prettier than plain brown apple butter.

Can you pee in the ocean?

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I am dying to try this--I love weird food--but the recipe was unclear--you steep the pickles in just the Kool aid mixture--the brine is discarded, right?

I'm wondering if there's enough sugar to keep this safe--or maybe the pickles are preserved enough from the brining--anyone thinking about this?

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They sort of remind me of those red-apple slices from the southern American cooking canon - you don't see them too much anymore, but they are round cored apple slices (gosh, are they pickled?  :shock: maybe, or maybe just poached) which are then set in a marinade that includes red-hots cinnamon candies (or so I seem to remember, but all this is just vague memory so I do hope someone jumps in here to add some intelligence  :biggrin: ) that makes them bright red when finished. Served as a side, sort of like a pickle.

My grandmother didn't make those red apple rings, but she did use red hots to sweeten and flavor her apple butter, so red hots might well have played a role. The apple butter was not, in the end, bright red, but instead a very subtle red, and certainly prettier than plain brown apple butter.

They still make those Apple Rings

http://www.knouse.com/ShopItem.aspx?ProductID=62

Wawa Sizzli FTW!

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I am dying to try this--I love weird food--but the recipe was unclear--you steep the pickles in just the Kool aid mixture--the brine is discarded, right?

I'm wondering if there's enough sugar to keep this safe--or maybe the pickles are preserved enough from the brining--anyone thinking about this?

I opened the jar, poured 1/8th out, added 1 cup sugar and a pack unsweetened KoolAid and put the lid on and shook til dissolved, and its steeping for two weeks...

Wawa Sizzli FTW!

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I'm just speechless. I've always agreed with those who have talked about the courage of the person who ate the first oyster or artichoke.

Where in the hell did Kool Aid pickles come from? Who was the first idiot to think of it? I agree: Oh. My. Gawd.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Update!

I just looked and the lime KoolAid pickles have shrunk to half their size in the jar! I dont know what this means...

Hey GlorifiedRice! :smile: Thanks for the update. I've never made pickles or conducted any experiments with them of this nature, but I wonder if the amount of sugar used combined with ascorbic acid in the Kool Aid was drawing out whatever liquid present originally in the pickles? How long have they been marinating btw?

Inside me there is a thin woman screaming to get out, but I can usually keep the Bitch quiet: with CHOCOLATE!!!

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I wasn't crazy about the color I got from adding double-strength Kool Aid to the pickle brine, and the flavor wasn't noticeably different from a dill pickle (contrary to what the article describes), so rather than start from scratch, I just dumped the liquid and added Kool Aid mix and sugar to the jar -- the sugar drew enough liquid out of the pickles to immerse them in brine by the end of the day. We'll see how those go.

In the meantime, these came out just right:

Kool Aid Watermelon Pickles

all amounts are approximate

2 cups watermelon rind, peeled and sliced

1 cup water

1 cup white vinegar

1 1/2 cups sugar

2 packets cherry Kool Aid

Combine all ingredients and simmer until rind is tender. Remove rind to container with slotted spoon and reduce liquid until a little thicker. Jar, chill.

They come out a brilliant stop-sign red, all the way through.

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OMG Diva? you arent JUST a Foodie, but a Food Geek too! LOL

Theyve been marinating over 2 weeks.

I cut a piece off each lime and cherry..

The lime were yummy, a lil sweet and a hint of lime, same with the cherry.

I recommend them highly.

The cherry ones would be great chopped in chicken salad.

Edited by GlorifiedRice (log)

Wawa Sizzli FTW!

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  • 2 weeks later...
OMG Diva? you arent JUST a Foodie, but a Food Geek too! LOL

Theyve been marinating over 2 weeks.

I cut a piece off each lime and cherry..

The lime were yummy, a lil sweet and a hint of lime, same with the cherry.

I recommend them highly.

The cherry ones would be great chopped in chicken salad.

That photo was even scarier than one the NYT ran.

So you're saying these pickles are more than just a joke? They might actually have some culinary uses?

Todd A. Price aka "TAPrice"

Homepage and writings; A Frolic of My Own (personal blog)

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I used a big jar of Claussens. I poured off about 1/3 cup of brine.

I bought these

http://www.kraftfoods.com/koolaid/2001/ka_...rs_singles.html

And used 8 packets and closed it back up and shook it and let it steep

for 3 weeks.

I tried using a unsweetened lime Kool Aid pack and a cup of sugar in the second jar but it made the pickles shrink.

Wawa Sizzli FTW!

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Kudos to you GlorifiedRice! I think the results look fabulous; something to bring out the kid in all of us.:smile: Have you actually eaten one of these? I would. People have been pickling all sorts of things in creative ways forever, so hey why not? Didn't you mention that you might use them in chicken salad?

Inside me there is a thin woman screaming to get out, but I can usually keep the Bitch quiet: with CHOCOLATE!!!

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