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11 hours ago, Pastrypastmidnight said:

To be sure, you should temper the commercial product too. But you can partially melt the bottle, agitate it a lot to seed the melted cocoa butter with the solid tempered cocoa butter still in the bottle, cross your fingers, pray and use ;) . 

 

I think that I have heard someone say that if you spray cocoa butter with airbrush, the "airbrush" will temper the cocoa butter when you are spraying? Due to the cooling of the cocoa butter when blown out as small particles with cold air :) 

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4 hours ago, Madsandersen said:

 

I think that I have heard someone say that if you spray cocoa butter with airbrush, the "airbrush" will temper the cocoa butter when you are spraying? Due to the cooling of the cocoa butter when blown out as small particles with cold air :) 


One thing I've learned is everything involved with chocolate work will have 20 different people doing it 20 different ways and they all seem to work for the person doing it. Somewhere in all that, you just do what works for you. 

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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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4 hours ago, Madsandersen said:

I think that I have heard someone say that if you spray cocoa butter with airbrush, the "airbrush" will temper the cocoa butter when you are spraying? Due to the cooling of the cocoa butter when blown out as small particles with cold air :) 

 

Yes, that's written in one of those books that everyone have. Not sure which.

 

I never temper the cocoa butter except going down to 30 degrees or whatever, can't remember now. That guy in Belarus temper it though, cool it down to one state, and then heat it with a heat gun. 

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20 hours ago, Tri2Cook said:

One thing I've learned is everything involved with chocolate work will have 20 different people doing it 20 different ways and they all seem to work for the person doing it. Somewhere in all that, you just do what works for you. 

 

20 hours ago, Rajala said:

I never temper the cocoa butter except going down to 30 degrees or whatever, can't remember now. That guy in Belarus temper it though, cool it down to one state, and then heat it with a heat gun. 

 

To illustrate @Tri2Cook's point, I always temper my cocoa butter by heating it to 45C, then cooling with plenty of movement (i.e. stirring) to 31C before use.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Normally i partially melt the CCB without worring about the temp, and stir stir until its around 30-32

when i need a full temper i melt all the CCB to 50C, then let it set in the freezer until it gets around 26C and you can see some cristal floating at the top, then reheat to 32C.

 

hope it helps, no marble slab needed 😀

 

 

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  • 2 years later...

I'm curious if anyone has attempted to temper cocoa butter in a tempering machine (i.e. Chocovision Mini  Rev)?  Usually, when I decorate my molds, I use a contrasting chocolate.  This year I'm attempting all Vegan chocolates so my Vegan brother can enjoy some.  So I'm challenging myself to try coloring cocoa butter as decoration for that reason.  I'm worried about having similar troubles as @gfron1 did.  When I worked as a chocolatier, I watched my kitchen manager go through similar struggles with the cocoa butter sticking to the mold or just looking bad and out of temper if it did unmold, and she ended up scrapping the whole idea altogether.  I've been timid to try it on my own since.  Reading through this thread, it seems using a tempering machine may be a bit overkill, but I was hoping it might insure success.  Also, if it is a good option, I'm guessing you would use the dark chocolate setting (as it was mentioned earlier in this thread that dark chocolate temps are used)?  Thanks in advance!  😊

 

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47 minutes ago, Aria Dawn said:

I'm curious if anyone has attempted to temper cocoa butter in a tempering machine (i.e. Chocovision Mini  Rev)?  Usually, when I decorate my molds, I use a contrasting chocolate.  This year I'm attempting all Vegan chocolates so my Vegan brother can enjoy some.  So I'm challenging myself to try coloring cocoa butter as decoration for that reason.  I'm worried about having similar troubles as @gfron1 did.  When I worked as a chocolatier, I watched my kitchen manager go through similar struggles with the cocoa butter sticking to the mold or just looking bad and out of temper if it did unmold, and she ended up scrapping the whole idea altogether.  I've been timid to try it on my own since.  Reading through this thread, it seems using a tempering machine may be a bit overkill, but I was hoping it might insure success.  Also, if it is a good option, I'm guessing you would use the dark chocolate setting (as it was mentioned earlier in this thread that dark chocolate temps are used)?  Thanks in advance!  😊

 

Well yes - dark chocolate setting would be the one - but I rarely would need to temper enough coloured cocoa butter to consider the use of a machine. You would lose more to the process than you would use to decorate I suspect. And what would you use for seed?

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53 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

Well yes - dark chocolate setting would be the one - but I rarely would need to temper enough coloured cocoa butter to consider the use of a machine. You would lose more to the process than you would use to decorate I suspect. And what would you use for seed?

 

I agree with what Kerry wrote.  I can't imagine a situation where you would need enough colored cocoa butter (of a single color) to use a Chocovision machine (recall that the machine needs extra to make sure the thermometer is covered at all times).  You can just follow one of the usual methods of tempering chocolate:  (1) raise the temp, then cool the c.b. down, then up again or (2) raise the temp, cool the c.b. down to around 93F/34C, then add seed (you could use fresh cocoa butter for that), then lower temp to 86F/30C, then test the c.b., you will have tempered c.b.  Just don't let the temp go down too low or up too high while using it or it will go out of temper.

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4 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

Well yes - dark chocolate setting would be the one - but I rarely would need to temper enough coloured cocoa butter to consider the use of a machine. You would lose more to the process than you would use to decorate I suspect. And what would you use for seed?

 

 

I would use my MiniRev for the decorating cocoa butter, which you can use a minimum of 4 oz. in (according to the manual), and the plan is to add oil-based color to plain cocoa butter myself.  So more of the plain for seed.  Any leftovers I would save and use again as one would with pre-made.  I'm curious if any of this is at all feasible or even wise.

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4 hours ago, Jim D. said:

 

I agree with what Kerry wrote.  I can't imagine a situation where you would need enough colored cocoa butter (of a single color) to use a Chocovision machine (recall that the machine needs extra to make sure the thermometer is covered at all times).  You can just follow one of the usual methods of tempering chocolate:  (1) raise the temp, then cool the c.b. down, then up again or (2) raise the temp, cool the c.b. down to around 93F/34C, then add seed (you could use fresh cocoa butter for that), then lower temp to 86F/30C, then test the c.b., you will have tempered c.b.  Just don't let the temp go down too low or up too high while using it or it will go out of temper.

 

 

Thanks.  I will try that method if I get any grave foreboding responses from anyone who's tried it with the machine.  😁

Edited by Aria Dawn (log)
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17 minutes ago, Aria Dawn said:

 

 

I would use my MiniRev for the decorating cocoa butter, which you can use a minimum of 4 oz. in (according to the manual), and the plan is to add oil-based color to plain cocoa butter myself.  So more of the plain for seed.  Any leftovers I would save and use again as one would with pre-made.  I'm curious if any of this is at all feasible or even wise.

 

Most people use an immersion blender to mix the cocoa butter with colorant.  That's what I have done.  It takes more effort than it might seem to get them mixed, so I'm wondering if the gentle action of the Chocovision bowl turning would accomplish that.  Some people also strain the mixture afterward to get out any remaining lumps.  If you use this method, be sure and have a deep container to prevent coloring your kitchen walls.

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4 minutes ago, Jim D. said:

 

Most people use an immersion blender to mix the cocoa butter with colorant.  That's what I have done.  It takes more effort than it might seem to get them mixed, so I'm wondering if the gentle action of the Chocovision bowl turning would accomplish that.  Some people also strain the mixture afterward to get out any remaining lumps.  If you use this method, be sure and have a deep container to prevent coloring your kitchen walls.

And yourself!

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36 minutes ago, Jim D. said:

 

Most people use an immersion blender to mix the cocoa butter with colorant.  That's what I have done.  It takes more effort than it might seem to get them mixed, so I'm wondering if the gentle action of the Chocovision bowl turning would accomplish that.  Some people also strain the mixture afterward to get out any remaining lumps.  If you use this method, be sure and have a deep container to prevent coloring your kitchen walls.

 

 

Thanks for the tips!  It's good to have a sense of what I'm getting myself in to here.  

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