Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

"The Perfect Scoop" by David Lebovitz on ice cream


Recommended Posts

even with full fat yogurt, i drain the yogurt for a few hours to overnight through cheesecloth to get rid of excess moisture. i think this might be your problem.

you can always use middle eastern yogurt called: kefir or labne...this is tangy, delicious and already drained. sort of like an extra thick sour cream, but with cultures. delicious!

Link to post
Share on other sites
even with full fat yogurt, i drain the yogurt for a few hours to overnight through cheesecloth to get rid of excess moisture.  i think this might be your problem.

you can always use middle eastern yogurt called: kefir or labne...this is tangy, delicious and already drained.  sort of like an extra thick sour cream, but with cultures.  delicious!

Was wondering about draining. The recipe implies that draining wasn't required if using the Greek style yogurt. But draining makes sense- I likely have an excess of ice?

:checking previous posting: tejon drained her yogurt and had the same issue.

Huh- freezing kefir... We have alot of Kefir in town. Though I don't think its the same as what you are talking about. Ours is produced by Nancys yogurt and is a runny drinkable yogurt. But very tangy. Definitely not drained tho. Likely a name bastardization by the Nancy's people?

thanks!

flavor floozy

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep - I used Mountain brand full fat yogurt, drained overnight. The texture was the same as labne by the time I ended up stirring in the sugar and vanilla.

Kathy

Cooking is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all. - Harriet Van Horne

Link to post
Share on other sites

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

Link to post
Share on other sites

I made the Salted Butter Caramel this past weekend; when I discovered that somehow only fine sea salt was in my boyfriend's cabinets, I used Kathy's suggestion on modifying for that and it worked perfectly. Suffice it to say that there is no more.

Which means that it's time for more ice cream this weekend! I was planning on trying David's recipe including the cookie-dough mix-ins (as a favor to someone whose absolute favorite treat is DQ's cookie-dough blizzard) but left the book at home like a big dummy. Called around to the local B&Ns, Sur La Tables, locally-owned places and NOTHING!

Which means it's the frozen yogurt for us unless anybody has more search tips. Any more ideas on preserving the texture after freezing overnight? I'll be using whole-fat Greek yogurt, drained.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Search tip: check your local public library. I often check out cookbooks to decide if I want to purchase them. This one's a keeper.

"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

Link to post
Share on other sites

Speaking of the library, that's where I just got my copy! Although I'm sure, after looking through it, that it's going on my birthday list. So many exciting flavors, and I love the mix-in suggestions and recipes, because I am a big big fan of chunky ice cream.

So far I have tried the strawberry sour cream and the milk chocolate. I very much liked the strawberry sour cream, and found that it actually firmed up really fast. I don't usually even like strawberry ice cream, but this one really tasted like strawberries. I didn't think it was extremely sour, but it was enough to cut the sweetness. And I think the brand of sour cream I used-organic, without any thickeners-was particularly sour, so that may have helped.

I added brownie (the chewy brownies from the back) and cocoa nibs to the milk chocolate ice cream. I think the brownies do, as promised, keep their chewiness and flavor in the ice cream, which was a pleasant surprise. However, two cups might have been a little too much for some people-I sort of taste the brownie more than the ice cream. It is a nice background for the brownie though! And the cocoa nibs were a welcome crunch. I did have a little trouble getting this one to firm up-but I think that might have been because I have a cheapo Donvier ice cream machine, the kind where you freeze the canister, and I only let it freeze for six hours in between the strawberry and milk chocolate ice creams.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I knew I had to do something about the ever increasing variety of containers in my freezer. Since today was Sunday, I thought why not have an old-fashioned Ice Cream Sundae Social. I served the following:

Ice Creams & Sorbets

Roasted Banana Ice Cream

French Vanilla Ice Cream

Strawberry-Sour Cream Ice Cream (made with home grown Fraise des bois berries)

Chocolate Coconut Sorbet

Toppings

Classic Hot Fudge (made with Valrhona Guanaja – simply wonderful)

Candied Sour Cherries

Fresh Fraise des bois berries (tiny wild strawberries from my garden)

Ripe Bananas

Toasted Almond Slivers (slivered almonds with Kirschwasser and a little sugar, toasted)

Whipped Cream

70% Dark Chocolate Chips

What a wonderful evening; we were all kids again enjoying our hot fudge sundaes!

(One nice thing about this type of party: you can do everything ahead of time and just enjoy your guests when they arrive.)

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

Link to post
Share on other sites
Well I knew I had to do something about the ever increasing variety of containers in my freezer.  Since today was Sunday, I thought why not have an old-fashioned Ice Cream Sundae Social

Clever! I'm dying to try a new recipe, but I've still got three containers in the freezer. There IS a limit to how much ice cream a single woman needs in her freezer at any given time.

This brings up something I've been wondering about anyway – how long do homemade ice creams keep fresh?

I'm gonna go bake something…

wanna come with?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Well I knew I had to do something about the ever increasing variety of containers in my freezer.  Since today was Sunday, I thought why not have an old-fashioned Ice Cream Sundae Social

Clever! I'm dying to try a new recipe, but I've still got three containers in the freezer. There IS a limit to how much ice cream a single woman needs in her freezer at any given time.

This brings up something I've been wondering about anyway – how long do homemade ice creams keep fresh?

That’s a good question and I’m not exactly sure of the right answer. I think that because these recipes don’t use any stabilizers, they’re meant to be eaten fairly quickly. Surely they’ll last several weeks; however, the texture may degrade over time becoming more grainy.

Loved that scene in the Albert Brooks / Debbie Reynolds movie Mother when she offers her son some ice cream and he complains that it has gone bad. No it’s still good under the protective covering of ice, she replies. Too funny!

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

Link to post
Share on other sites

homemade ice cream is meant to be eaten within a couple of days. you can increase the shelf life by placing plastic wrap directly on the surface of the ice cream to prevent ice crystals from forming...but as john says, the texture does degrade after a while.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I made the Gianduja Stracciatella Gelato and served it in a bowl made from David's Ice Cream Cone recipie.

gallery_40084_4727_128137.jpg

I used some of my bulk Callubeut dark chocolate for the stracciatella to ensure it was top quality.

The cone batter was pretty thick and not that easy to spread into an even circle on the baking paper, but it was managable. Not owning a cone form I pressed the circles over an upturned bowl. This proves that you don't require a press to make cones or bowls on your own.

It all worked out rather well and my wife pronouced the gelato superb.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Am I the only one who's been making ice cream???

I made the chocolate-peanut butter ice cream a week or two ago, and while it is very tasty, I realized while churning it that it's really more of a winter ice cream. It's been hovering in the 110's here, temperature-wise, and so I can only handle this ice cream's richness when it's paired with a vanilla or some fruit. Also it froze rock hard, much harder than the other ice creams I've made from the book.

I also made the French-style vanilla and the olive oil. The vanilla was very good, of course, but almost a bit tooo rich. I think I might go for Philadelphia-style next time.

I decided to try the olive oil on a whim and because it sounded sort of refreshing. While cooking the custard, I used a whisk instead of a spatula, because the spatula hadn't worked that effectively for me with the vanilla. Even then, I had a few cooked egg pieces that I had to be careful to not push through the strainer-the same happened with the vanilla. I'm keeping it on just below medium heat and stirring constantly, but I think next time I'm just going to cook it on a double boiler. It'll take longer, but I have an egg phobia!

Anyway, the olive oil ice cream tastes undeniably of olive oil. The first spoonful is a bit of a shock, but after that I thought it was very good. It's much better paired with some peaches than it is by itself, I think, just like how you wouldn't eat olive oil on its own. I gave some to my mother to try, and she described it as "too avant-garde", but I think I would make it again, as long as I had some good summer fruit to pair it with.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Am I the only one who's been making ice cream???

Nope, I make ice cream pretty often during summer. I just haven't been making ice cream from the book this thread is about. I have the custards for a rose ice cream (made with rose petals from my neighbor's garden, she also gave me a big pile of rhubarb a few days ago so I've been busy with that as well) and a pomegranate ice cream chilling in the fridge right now.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Not at all! I just made some Dried Apricot-Pistachio Ice Cream the other day. My husband really loves dried apricots, so it was mostly for him (not a huge fan here). I have to admit, it was quite tasty. Little flecks of wine soaked apricot and the slight crunch of pistachios. Nice combination. Oh, and it made much more than the 3 cups indicated - I got a little bit over a quart after processing.

gallery_9138_54_224198.jpg

Kathy

Cooking is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all. - Harriet Van Horne

Link to post
Share on other sites

This topic is killing me. I LOVE ice cream and have been thinking about buying David's book for months, but I'm wondering if my $50 Cuisinart ice cream maker will do the trick. I've only used it a couple of times -- the sorbet I made was very good but an ice cream I tried was icy.

I'm hoping that I just had a bad recipe, but I'd hate to buy the book and get disappointing results.

Anyone else using the Cuisinart? (I think it's the ICE-20)

Link to post
Share on other sites
This topic is killing me. I LOVE ice cream and have been thinking about buying David's book for months, but I'm wondering if my $50 Cuisinart ice cream maker will do the trick. I've only used it a couple of times -- the sorbet I made was very good but an ice cream I tried was icy.

I'm hoping that I just had a bad recipe, but I'd hate to buy the book and get disappointing results.

Anyone else using the Cuisinart? (I think it's the ICE-20)

Should work just fine, the recipes are great and there is lots of advice in there on how to avoid icy.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I use that exact Cuisinart. Works really well, though the ice cream comes out on the soft side when you're finished (this happens with all cylinder style ice cream makers, not just this model). I usually pop the ice cream into an airtight container and freeze for another few hours to firm things up. Also, make sure the ice cream base is *very* cold when you start, and that the freezing cylinder has been in the freezer for at least 24 hours before processing.

Edited by tejon (log)

Kathy

Cooking is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all. - Harriet Van Horne

Link to post
Share on other sites

I churned up a batch of the sour cherry frozen yogurt yesterday. The yield was considerably less then the 3 cups stated. It was still quite soft last night when I sat down to try it.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

Link to post
Share on other sites

I love this book. I got the KA icecream bowl attachment this year for Mother's Day. I want to be able to tailor what I serve to my kids...I stay away from refined white sugars, and tend to use goat milk as it sits better with one of my kids.

So far I have had a lot of fun making berry sorbets. I made a banana icecream using a custard base too. But as soon as I got my hands on David's great book I knew I had to start with the roasted banana ice cream. It's wonderful. I used organic cane sugar throughout the recipe and used whole-fat goat milk; I think the goat milk balances the sweetness with a bit of tartness. However, I doubt most people would perceive its impact if they were not told about it... It was a huge hit with the whole family.

Roasted Banana Caramel Goodness...in the cuisinart - one could stop the recipe right here and eat the whole lot

gallery_41870_2503_47907.jpg

Roasted Banana Ice Cream - served soft as I churned it while making dinner and ate it within an hour of being chilled

gallery_41870_2503_20291.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw a beautiful display of sour cherries at the farmer's market and brought home a few baskets.

gallery_6902_4825_112228.jpg

Here they are ready to meet their maker :laugh: .

gallery_6902_4825_96148.jpg

So I thought I'd better make some of David's Vanilla - here's the base.

gallery_6902_4825_75532.jpg

And I ended up with this :smile:,

gallery_6902_4825_44802.jpg

Which I'm calling NYS Sour Cherry "Soup" with Vanilla Bourbon Ice Cream & Bing Cherry Sorbet.

Edited by weinoo (log)

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...