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Barbque North of the Mason Dixon


fedelst
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Face it, the North has been given a bum rap when it comes down to Bar-B-Que. Each state south of the Mason-Dixon boasts their own style, and each regional bar-b-que style is respected for what it is. We don’t see Memphis joints looking to emulate Kansas City style, and Texas wouldn’t dare produce anything that was not authentic Texas style.

So, why is it that the North East (and to the North, Canada) have not been given the right to establish their own Bar-B-Que style? Go into any Q joint north of the Mason Dixon, and you will see most every joint boasting ‘Memphis’ ‘Texas’ or ‘Kansas City’ style Q or sauces. God help you if you find Adirondack, Bangor, Cleveland or Seattle style Bar-B-Que as the selling point. I expect that someone in each of these regions has elaborated their own Q Style, but I have never seen it being marketed.

Is this to say, that anyone attempting to establish a Bar-B-Que style in any of these regions using their own unique taste would be insane? Or for that matter, if one were to open a Q joint in a region void of any true local bar-B-que could they possibly succeed in staking their own flag in the soil and start Q culture in their region?

Let’s consider virgin territory, Quebec, La belle Province. If you talk to anyone about bar-b-que, they think rotisserie chicken. Don’t even ask, This is what it is called here, and there is no way you can change that. We have established Montreal Steak Spice, which is a bit of a surprise as up until it was branded as such, it was just Steak Spice, pretty much the same mix as you could get anywhere, but the Montreal name makes it a bit more quaint and marketable. Other than our Rotisserie Chicken and famous steak spice, there is no true Q culture here.

A few weak attempts have been made in establishing Q in Quebec, yet none have gone in whole hog, and actually established a proper Pit team, and a menu focusing on Bar-B-que only. That is, not until recently. I respect the efforts of other establishments that offer Q as a part of their menu, but BowFinger at 5667 Sherbrooke St, West in Montreal actually went the distance. Having sampled a number of items from their menu, it is clear that this joint has established a clearly Canadian Bar-B-Que flavor. Smoking only on Maple, the Bowfinger product had a distinct flavor that screams Canadian. Add to this, their home made sauces, we find a product that does not resemble Texas, Arkansas, Tampa, or anywhere else, it is as distinct as the province of Quebec.

I appreciate the quality of the Bar-B-Que expertly prepared by most of the Bar-B-Que joints that I have sampled throughout the North East, but have to classify them as ‘Southern Extensions’ with their claims of ‘put the South in Your Mouth’ and the alignment of their menu to their attempt to emulate ‘authentic’ southern Q. It is a shame that more joints do not attempt to establish a distinct regional Bar-B-Que flavor, and take the lead from BowFinger. I believe that we will see with the success of these joints, that more will come on the wagon, and ultimately, we will have a defined and established regional Q style.

Veni. Vidi. Voro.

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I've always thought a distinctly northern style of barbecue, based on maple smoke, was a good idea. I agree that the most important ingredients for good Q, regardless of region, are a talented, dedicated pit boss and crew. But there seems to be an online body of opinion, particularly on that "other board", that the Q at Bofinger is very uneven. The ribs are not tender and suffer from too much dry rub, the pulled meat is not sufficiently smoky, and the sides are lousy. Also, I'm curious. Which of the sauces are "uniquely Quebec"? I understood they were supposed to mimic the table sauces used in various southern U. S. styles.

I'm sure that with perseverance, the current problems can be fixed and a more consistent Q produced. I hope that the above post is not an attempt to stave off criticism by declaring mediocrity a style. I'm sure that the owners of Bofinger's, if they ascribe to the ideas expressed in fedelst's post, will be more than willing come down to the U. S. and pit their "style" against other regional Q's in some of our many barbecue cook-offs and contests. I hope to see them there.

Edited by rcianci (log)
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I've always thought a distinctly northern style of barbecue, based on maple smoke, was a good idea. I agree that the most important ingredients for good Q, regardless of region, are a talented, dedicated pit boss and crew. But there seems to be an online body of opinion, particularly on that "other board", that the Q at Bofinger is very uneven. The ribs are not tender and suffer from too much dry rub, the pulled meat is not sufficiently smoky, and the sides are lousy. Also, I'm curious. Which of the sauces are "uniquely Quebec"? I understood they were supposed to mimic the table sauces used in various southern U. S. styles.

I'm sure that with perseverance, the current problems can be fixed and a more consistent Q produced. I hope that the above post is not an attempt to stave off criticism by declaring mediocrity a style. I'm sure that the owners of Bofinger's, if they ascribe to the ideas expressed in fedelst's post, will be more than willing come down to the U. S. and pit their "style" against other regional Q's in some of our many barbecue cook-offs and contests. I hope to see them there.

Good points.

Let me state for the record, that I have nothing to do with Bofinger (am not associated), and am typically very critical of any meal that I eat in a restaurant. It is my perspective that if I am going to pay for a meal, I should be presented with a product that is worthy of the price paid.

I have discussed with one of the partners at Bofinger their concept, and asked why they chose to open a Q joint, in a city that has had limited success in establishing such an operation. I also discussed their mixed reviews. Instead of providing a lengthy explanation, he came out with the menu items in question. Specifically the potato salad, and Brisket. As I already had Pulled pork on my plate, I got to sample this as well.

Having been smoking (food) for the past 25+ years, I have developed an appreciation for properly smoked food, and the ability to identify creosote coated junk. If your smoker is billowing thick clouds of smoke, you do not want to eat what is in that smoker. Smoking is a process requiring time, patience, good quality raw materials, and above all clean wood.

The pulled pork at Bofinger has an unmistakable Smokey taste to it. It is a clean product, as in, it is not pulled and soaked in a thick sauce cloying the flavor of the meat. It is kept moist with its own juices and a small addition of a vinegar based sauce. I believe the review you were referring to was an article in one of the free papers, where the reviewer tries to come off as an expert on Q. [if you re-read this review, you will find that a lot of his commentary is actually plagiarized from Chowhound. This would not be the first time a supposed ‘restaurant critic’ had borrowed copy. I can cite one critic who had taken complete paragraphs from David Rosengarten’s journals].

The brisket has a smoke ring around the perimeter of the sliced meat, a sign that the meat was slowly smoked at low temperatures. If anything, I find the prevalence of smoke in the brisket a bit strong; but considering that the brisket just came out of the smoker, and had not been left to sit, it had not been given the opportunity to mellow.

As for the sides… The slaw is a thick hand cut oil and vinegar based salad, laced with mustard seed, and herbs. It may not be your typical St. Hubert variety, but it certainly is a good slaw. As for the Potato Salad, the owners suspect that their reviews were based on single visits, and in the first 5 weeks of operations (when the reviews were published). They state that what had started out as a small batch recipe had been multiplied over time to accommodate a higher volume of business. Honestly, I could care less. What matters is, is the potato salad worth eating? or is it as awful as the reviews pan it… The answer is, the potato salad is made with fresh red bliss potatoes, in a not too heavy mayo based dressing, with herbs, and I believe green olives. The Potato salad was well seasoned, very fresh, and I would certainly say it rivals a good home made product, and would definitely order it again (a bit of snipped dill would be a great addition (in my humble opinion)).

My comments about distinct Q style are based on the fact that the pit crew are not working on recipes from other locales, and have based their product entirely on maple wood smoking. Although this works well for most meats, I find it too strong and not suitable for seafood or fish. But then again, they don’t serve seafood or fish. They have invested in a good sized professional smoker, and are capable of producing a consistent quality product. The sauces, although named for other regions, are atypical of these regions, except for the base concept. Rather, although the sauce may be called Atomic Alabama or Memphis Magic, these are their own twist on a cider based or a Tomato based product. Actually, I find the Atomic Alabama sauce to be on the relatively medium side, and heavily based on simmered onions, Closer to a spicy Sabrette’s sauce than anything typical of Alabama Q.

Bofinger may not be the world’s best Q, but it is good Q, and represents what I see as a contender for what I would define as a distinct flavor typical of Quebec tastes, and resources. Having tried Q throughout the US, and smoking my own, I have come to appreciate the regional differences, and can identify good from bad.

Would Bofinger win in a cook off? Well certainly in Montreal, and probably in Canada. As for compared with others at a US National cook off, they may not be the first prize winner, but you would not see the judges spitting and gagging.

I give them credit for their effort, and their ability to establish a decent Q joint in Montreal….. and for the fact that they serve the ever critical draft beer to go with their meals. I challenge any critic to go back for a second or third visit. If after these visits they declare that the food is not smoked enough, or the sides to be unfit for consumption, then I question the ability of the critic.

Veni. Vidi. Voro.

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The pulled pork at Bofinger has an unmistakable Smokey taste to it. It is a clean product, as in, it is not pulled and soaked in a thick sauce cloying the flavor of the meat. It is kept moist with its own juices and a small addition of a vinegar based sauce. I believe the review you were referring to was an article in one of the free papers, where the reviewer tries to come off as an expert on Q. [if you re-read this review, you will find that a lot of his commentary is actually plagiarized from Chowhound. This would not be the first time a supposed ‘restaurant critic’ had borrowed copy. I can cite one critic who had taken complete paragraphs from David Rosengarten’s journals].

I was referring to the opinions expressed on Chowhound by people who have eaten at Bofingers. I hadn't read any newspaper reviews.

The brisket has a smoke ring around the perimeter of the sliced meat, a sign that the meat was slowly smoked at low temperatures. If anything, I find the prevalence of smoke in the brisket a bit strong; but considering that the brisket just came out of the smoker, and had not been left to sit, it had not been given the opportunity to mellow.

A smoke ring in the meat sounds promising. Is it also moist? Brisket is the hardest to get right because of the long smoking times required.

Bofinger may not be the world’s best Q, but it is good Q, and represents what I see as a contender for what I would define as a distinct flavor typical of Quebec tastes, and resources. Having tried Q throughout the US, and smoking my own, I have come to appreciate the regional differences, and can identify good from bad. 

Would Bofinger win in a cook off? Well certainly in Montreal, and probably in Canada. As for compared with others at a US National cook off, they may not be the first prize winner, but you would not see the judges spitting and gagging.

I give them credit for their effort, and their ability to establish a decent Q joint in Montreal….. and for the fact that they serve the ever critical draft beer to go with their meals. I challenge any critic to go back for a second or third visit. If after these visits they declare that the food is not smoked enough, or the sides to be unfit for consumption, then I question the ability of the critic.

The world of barbecue does not lack for people who like to brag. :biggrin:

That's why it has contests.

New Hampshire State Barbecue Championship

Anheuser-Busch Brewery

Merrimack, NH

June 23-24

Harpoon BBQ Championship of New England

Harpoon Brewery Windsor, VT

July 28-29

Hudson Valley Ribfest

New Paltz, NY

August 17-19

and most importantly

Canadian National BBQ Championships

Whistler, B. C.

August 4-5

Edited by rcianci (log)
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  • 1 month later...
  • 1 month later...

I had my first opportunity recently to visit Bofinger.

First impressions of Bofinger: this place is packed. Young, old, families… either the people in NDG can't/won't cook or they're hooked on the food.

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All the tables outside were full (not that I enjoy eating al fresco to begin with) and the booths were full so I sidled up to the front window counter. Bottles of ketchup, rolls of paper towel.

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Orders of 6 pork ribs with beans and 6 beef ribs with mac&cheese and fries came out in pie plates. Didn't try brisket or pulled pork or coleslaw and potato salad (something about mayonnaise in a warm environment doesn't seem too inviting). Service is jovial but somewhat disorganized; completed eat-in orders are called out (fine by me) but the pork came without sauce and the beef came without bread.

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Portions are more than generous; there are actually eight (8) ribs in each order. Shot of a beef rib; you can see the smoke ring.

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Spice rub and sauces

Bofinger's rub is more subtle and I had difficulty detecting whether it complemented the meat and the smoke.

I tried the Texas and Alabama sauces; the former is a tomato-ey concoction similar to what I had in Houston (though not quite on; the TX sauces was better) while the other one is cider-based and spicy. Both were pretty good and enhanced the ribs in different ways.

The ribs

The pork ribs appeared to be individual ribs from St Louis style slabs. They had a nice prominent smoke taste (I can smell maple but couldn't get a clean taste of it) but the ribs were chewier than expected and surprisingly dry. The meat stayed on the bone and there was some issues with respect to trimming the meat (slightly more residual fat and gristle).

Beef ribs: disaster. The ribs were wildly inconsistent, with a couple essentially inedible briquets while others were simply just very dry.

The dryness of these ribs as well made me wonder if the pit boss was having a bad day or if it was the team finishing everything off on the grill (I suspect the latter). Perhaps something to verify again at a later date, and perhaps compare to pork and brisket.

Sides

Fries are really good, and I liked them better with the two sauces.

Mac and cheese was so-so; a bit overcooked and somewhat lacking a clear cheese taste.

The beans are "tangy". I kept tasting them to see what made them so and then I hit on a sprig of dill. Pickle brine? Okay…

Comparison to Mesquite

Personally I think that barbecue is something that the Americans consistently do much better and we still have a way to go.

Both Mesquite and Bofinger have their strong and weak points in the kitchen but they're not really direct competitors. I think that Bofinger is really trying to be a barbecue pit, while I see Mesquite as more of a Louisiana place that happens to sell barbecue. It is nice to see a little competition in the local scene and I think that will improve both restaurants (better for us eaters).

Mesquite's spice rub is more pronounced than Bofinger's and its ribs are more tender and succulent than the ones I had at Bofinger. Its beef ribs are definitely better but then again, they're not a regular menu item.

Bofinger on the other hand smacks Mesquite on the sauce (Mesquite has one sauce and it's too damn sweet) and has better overall smoke flavor.

Sides? I'd err on the side of caution and stay with fries at both places; both are inconsistent in this regard.

The best I can say is "stay away from Mesquite's sauce and don't order Bofinger's beef ribs". Apart from that, try both, decide for yourself and go wild.

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I haven't tried the ribs, but on several visits have sampled the pulled pork, beef brisket, and chicken. Favourite is pulled pork by far, although the others were certainly good. All have a pronounced smoky taste, although I have found that this varies from visit to visit - yesterday's pulled pork sandwich was definitely smokier-tasting than the one I had last week. I agree that the best side is definitely fries. Now I'm hungry...

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  • 4 weeks later...
Does Bofinger have a smoker?

Certainly, Otherwise, they really could not call themselves a smoke house n'est pas?

If you get a chance to speak with Steph, one of the owners, he can tell you about the trials and tribulations of selecting the right smoker and manufacturer.

BTW as a side, the beans are worth a try, as is the Potato salad. I side with the pork ribs over the beef, and the brisket is juicy and properly smoked. Not over smoked, as most places do.

I have had too many less than enjoyable experiences at Mesquite to want to venture back. This is too bad, because I know the owner is capable in the kitchen. Yet, it seems when he is not there he trusts his kitchen to hacks. Try a dry over smoked chicken that was dropped in a deep fryer to reheat. or stiff stale buns on a pulled pork sandwich... What were they thinking as they sawed through the dry bun.. "oh, I am sure no one will notice this giant crouton"? ...NEXT.

Side note:

Remember, if you see billows of smoke coming out of a smoker, stay away, as the food is not being smoked, but embalmed with creosote... which the last time I checked was toxic. Proper smoking involves low and slow heat and almost a vapor of smoke.

I will never forget some road side joint in New Hampshire that has a tar coated shack that was just billowing smoke, and seeing dark chunks of their 'famous' smoked cheddar by the cash... Probably a good substitute for patch users.

Edited by fedelst (log)

Veni. Vidi. Voro.

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  • 1 month later...
Does Bofinger have a smoker?

Certainly, Otherwise, they really could not call themselves a smoke house n'est pas?

If you get a chance to speak with Steph, one of the owners, he can tell you about the trials and tribulations of selecting the right smoker and manufacturer.

BTW as a side, the beans are worth a try, as is the Potato salad. I side with the pork ribs over the beef, and the brisket is juicy and properly smoked. Not over smoked, as most places do.

I have had too many less than enjoyable experiences at Mesquite to want to venture back. This is too bad, because I know the owner is capable in the kitchen. Yet, it seems when he is not there he trusts his kitchen to hacks. Try a dry over smoked chicken that was dropped in a deep fryer to reheat. or stiff stale buns on a pulled pork sandwich... What were they thinking as they sawed through the dry bun.. "oh, I am sure no one will notice this giant crouton"? ...NEXT.

Side note:

Remember, if you see billows of smoke coming out of a smoker, stay away, as the food is not being smoked, but embalmed with creosote... which the last time I checked was toxic. Proper smoking involves low and slow heat and almost a vapor of smoke.

I will never forget some road side joint in New Hampshire that has a tar coated shack that was just billowing smoke, and seeing dark chunks of their 'famous' smoked cheddar by the cash... Probably a good substitute for patch users.

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OOOps, Sorry about that (new here...)

Just my 2c.

I think that BBQ as we generally know it was born in the southern US (I don't want to spark a debate as to what the Arawaks were doing or cavemen for that matter...or even grilling vs BBQ....I think you know what I mean).

As such, I think, they developed good Q in the south and it became a benchmark.

And as everyone developed their own regional techniques and tastes, they themselves became 'standards', such as Carolina, Memphis, Texas, Kansas City, etc. Everyone wants to emulate the 'best' and thats why joints in the rest of the world advertise "Memphis Style" or "Kansas City BBQ" .

As for fuel, nobody was importing Brazilian hardwood charcoal. They simply used what was local, be it hickory, oak, mesquite. As their wood was accepted, they probably shrugged and just turned their nose to other woods.

Why do north eastern joints use maple? Not because it offers that perfect nuance, or flavor, but because its nearby, easy to get, and cheap. Ask locally for charcoal and the first thing a supplier will probably offer is the feuille d'erable 100% hardwood lump charcoal from Ste Christine/Cte Portneuf (brown bag, red and blue print, red maple leaf). (Queue de Cheval uses it, Chalet BBQ uses it, etc).

There are many techniques with smoking, some heavy, some light. I would like to think it depends on the application and the preference of the pit master. Can some stuff be oversmoked? Yessir. In the same breath, I'd say some stuff can be undersmoked. I think "embalmed with creosote" is a bit extreme. As for the health aspect, apparently any amount of smoke carries carcinogens (a risk I'm more than willing to take HAHA).

OK, that said, I don't think you can properly compare Bo Finger and Mesquite. I wholeheartedly agree with wattacetti here (and on many other points) that Bo Finger is trying to be a BBQ pit and Mesquite is a restaurant selling BBQ.

Both have a lot of potential and both fall short. Does this mean they're failing? Certainly not, as they are doing a brisk business (Bo Finger is apparently opening soon on the West Island).

I was just hoping for BETTER Q.

Mesquite, to me, was so lack luster that I simply lost interest.

Bo Finger's opening had me jacked up, but my first visit was disappointing, as most everything was way too dry. OK it was their first week, so I tried again 3 weeks ago. Samething.

I'm not that critical on their sides...they are after all only sides. What should be shining is the ribs, brisket, and sandwiches. But to my tastes, too dry.

I only hope they can resolve this.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Having read the mixed review from Sarah Musgrave, I was very skeptical on my first visit, and actually brought up the concerns raised in the review with Steph (one of hte owners).... who proceeded to bring out a sampling of the Potato salad in question, and some just out of hthe smoker brisket. The potato salad was very good, and perfectly dressed. The brisket was juicy, tasty, not over smoked (usually the sign of a beginner) and had a perfect smoke ring.

He had admitted that there were a few bumps in the road in the first few weeks, and I respect that. I have been back a number of times since, some meals being better then others.

From my perspective:

- the pulled pork, pork ribs, and brisket are my top picks for mains,

- the beans or potato salad for sides. The slaw works too, but the cucumber salad and mac don't do it for me.

- The Cuban is nothing like a traditional Cuban, (which I have yet to find a decent one in Montreal), but tasty, if not a bit oily from the Jardiniera.

- The beef ribs were also tasty but a bit too greasy for my liking.

- The burger, is well.. a burger. But you are not going there for a burger are you?

And most importantly, they have supremely cold beer.

I say, if you had a bad experience in the very early days, try it now. They have smoothed out a lot of the bumps in the road.

OOOps, Sorry about that (new here...)

Just my 2c.

I think that BBQ as we generally know it was born in the southern US (I don't want to spark a debate as to what the Arawaks were doing or cavemen for that matter...or even grilling vs BBQ....I think you know what I mean).

As such, I think, they developed good Q in the south and it became a benchmark.

And as everyone developed their own regional techniques and tastes, they themselves became 'standards', such as Carolina, Memphis, Texas, Kansas City, etc. Everyone wants to emulate the 'best' and thats why joints in the rest of the world advertise "Memphis Style" or "Kansas City BBQ" .

As for fuel, nobody was importing Brazilian hardwood charcoal. They simply used what was local, be it hickory, oak, mesquite. As their wood was accepted, they probably shrugged and just turned their nose to other woods.

Why do north eastern joints use maple? Not because it offers that perfect nuance, or flavor, but because its nearby, easy to get, and cheap. Ask locally for charcoal and the first thing a supplier will probably offer is the feuille d'erable 100% hardwood lump charcoal from Ste Christine/Cte Portneuf (brown bag, red and blue print, red maple leaf). (Queue de Cheval uses it, Chalet BBQ uses it, etc).

There are many techniques with smoking, some heavy, some light. I would like to think it depends on the application and the preference of the pit master. Can some stuff be oversmoked? Yessir. In the same breath, I'd say some stuff can be undersmoked. I think "embalmed with creosote" is a bit extreme. As for the health aspect, apparently any amount of smoke carries carcinogens (a risk I'm more than willing to take HAHA).

OK, that said, I don't think you can properly compare Bo Finger and Mesquite. I wholeheartedly agree with wattacetti here (and on many other points) that Bo Finger is trying to be a BBQ pit and Mesquite is a restaurant selling BBQ.

Both have a lot of potential and both fall short. Does this mean they're failing? Certainly not, as they are doing a brisk business (Bo Finger is apparently opening soon on the West Island).

I was just hoping for BETTER Q.

Mesquite, to me, was so lack luster that I simply lost interest.

Bo Finger's opening had me jacked up, but my first visit was disappointing, as most everything was way too dry. OK it was their first week, so I tried again 3 weeks ago. Samething.

I'm not that critical on their sides...they are after all only sides. What should be shining is the ribs, brisket, and sandwiches. But to my tastes, too dry. 

I only hope they can resolve this.

Veni. Vidi. Voro.

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Having read the mixed review from Sarah Musgrave, I was very skeptical on my first visit, and actually brought up the concerns raised in the review with Steph (one of hte owners).... who proceeded to bring out a sampling of the Potato salad in question, and some just out of hthe smoker brisket. The potato salad was very good, and perfectly dressed. The brisket was juicy, tasty, not over smoked (usually the sign of a beginner) and had a perfect smoke ring.

I know that Steph N. has been fairly successful in the past with his menus mainly because they are middle of the road with hints of “higher” cuisine.

This seems more of a family-type restaurant. Honest food? Yes. Great food? No. There is a fair amount of hype around this place and frankly I am wondering about the amount of praise some seem to be giving it...

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Hype?!??! No... Just glad to see someone out there bringing Bar-B-Que to a market void of anything worth a darn. We live in Quebec, a Province that typically calls rotisserie chicken Bar-B-Que... There is nothing Bar-B-Que about a rotisserie, except perhaps a place like Chalet that actually uses hardwood to smoke their chicken....

Perhaps this is not the worlds best Bar-B-Que, but there are precious few contenders in la belle province that actually put out anything that competes. Yes, it is honest food, I would say good food in most cases, Family friendly, yet, the cold beer and bar-b-que also has an appeal to the young adult crowd as well. I would not call it Tony Roma's, but then again, I would not position it at the other end of the spectrum and compare it to a place where your youngins' might end up being cooked and eaten like at Red Bones in Somerville Mass.

I have been smoking for over 25 years and I appreciate properly smoked food. These guys are the real deal. They know the difference between a proper smoking, and coating food with Creosote. Unfortunately many do not.

You are getting a plate of meat, and some sides. Fine Dining it is not.

Check it out yourself, tell us what you think.

Having read the mixed review from Sarah Musgrave, I was very skeptical on my first visit, and actually brought up the concerns raised in the review with Steph (one of hte owners).... who proceeded to bring out a sampling of the Potato salad in question, and some just out of hthe smoker brisket. The potato salad was very good, and perfectly dressed. The brisket was juicy, tasty, not over smoked (usually the sign of a beginner) and had a perfect smoke ring.

I know that Steph N. has been fairly successful in the past with his menus mainly because they are middle of the road with hints of “higher” cuisine.

This seems more of a family-type restaurant. Honest food? Yes. Great food? No. There is a fair amount of hype around this place and frankly I am wondering about the amount of praise some seem to be giving it...

Veni. Vidi. Voro.

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Hype?!??! No... Just glad to see someone out there bringing Bar-B-Que to a market void of anything worth a darn. We live in Quebec, a Province that typically calls rotisserie chicken Bar-B-Que... There is nothing Bar-B-Que about a rotisserie, except perhaps a place like Chalet that actually uses hardwood to smoke their chicken....

Perhaps this is not the worlds best Bar-B-Que, but there are precious few contenders in la belle province that actually put out anything that competes. Yes, it is honest food, I would say good food in most cases, Family friendly, yet, the cold beer and bar-b-que  also has  an appeal to the young adult crowd as  well. I would not call it Tony Roma's, but then again, I would not position it at the other end of the spectrum and compare it to a place where your youngins' might end up being cooked and eaten like at Red Bones in Somerville Mass.

I have been smoking for over 25 years and I appreciate properly smoked food. These guys are the real deal. They know the difference between a proper smoking, and coating food with Creosote. Unfortunately many do not.

You are getting a plate of meat, and some sides. Fine Dining it is not.

Check it out yourself, tell us what you think.

I have checked - hence why I find them so-so.

My review would echo wattacetti's.

Can time improve this place? Yes.

As much as I'd like to find great sushi in Montreal, that seems next to impossible. The same seems to go for great B-B-Q....

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No one said Great!!! But it is the best you will find in a restaurant in Montreal.

There surely is great Sushi in Montreal, I found it in that suburb called Toronto on Front Street at Take Sushi. :biggrin: Got to love a place where you are pretty much the only non-Japanese in the joint. Hell of a drive for dinner though...

Hype?!??! No... Just glad to see someone out there bringing Bar-B-Que to a market void of anything worth a darn. We live in Quebec, a Province that typically calls rotisserie chicken Bar-B-Que... There is nothing Bar-B-Que about a rotisserie, except perhaps a place like Chalet that actually uses hardwood to smoke their chicken....

Perhaps this is not the worlds best Bar-B-Que, but there are precious few contenders in la belle province that actually put out anything that competes. Yes, it is honest food, I would say good food in most cases, Family friendly, yet, the cold beer and bar-b-que  also has  an appeal to the young adult crowd as  well. I would not call it Tony Roma's, but then again, I would not position it at the other end of the spectrum and compare it to a place where your youngins' might end up being cooked and eaten like at Red Bones in Somerville Mass.

I have been smoking for over 25 years and I appreciate properly smoked food. These guys are the real deal. They know the difference between a proper smoking, and coating food with Creosote. Unfortunately many do not.

You are getting a plate of meat, and some sides. Fine Dining it is not.

Check it out yourself, tell us what you think.

I have checked - hence why I find them so-so.

My review would echo wattacetti's.

Can time improve this place? Yes.

As much as I'd like to find great sushi in Montreal, that seems next to impossible. The same seems to go for great B-B-Q....

Veni. Vidi. Voro.

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