Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Chris Amirault

The Last Bottle of Inner Beauty Real Hot Sauce

Recommended Posts

Hi,

  Thanks for the additional info, and for the Google research. It's interesting that you dug up some info on Sweet Papaya Mustard through Google. I could fine not a trace, but maybe my Google skills are not up to snuff. Well, at least that means I hopefully wasn't just hallucinating the existence of Sweet Papaya Mustard. It does sound likely that the less hot version of the Hot Sauce could be in the ballpark of what I knew as Sweet Papaya Mustard. Wonder if it was a different product, or just a re-branding of the less hot version of the sauce. I also love the taste of the "Real" hot sauce, but the Sweet Papaya Mustard was great in almost ketchup-like quantities on chicken sandwiches and the like. Something like that would be dangerous with the hot sauce. Thanks again! Might try my hand at Googling again, see if I can find what you found...

 

Ah, so I did another Google search, this time with quotes around "Sweet Papaya Mustard" and found a "Massachusetts Specialty Products Directory" from 1995 that lists all the Inner Beauty products at the time, which include the Hot sauce, Real Hot Sauce, Sweet Papaya Mustard and Blue Marlin Fish Sauce, which I had forgotten about (and didn't use much). Have now confirmed it wasn't all in my head. Now I'm curious if there is any way to find out what the ingredients were in the Sweet Papaya Mustard. I imagine not. Who ran the Inner Beauty company back then? Was it Chris Schlesinger...?


Edited by innerbooty additional comments (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/9/2017 at 0:38 PM, innerbooty said:

Hi,

  Thanks for the additional info, and for the Google research. It's interesting that you dug up some info on Sweet Papaya Mustard through Google. I could fine not a trace, but maybe my Google skills are not up to snuff. Well, at least that means I hopefully wasn't just hallucinating the existence of Sweet Papaya Mustard. It does sound likely that the less hot version of the Hot Sauce could be in the ballpark of what I knew as Sweet Papaya Mustard. Wonder if it was a different product, or just a re-branding of the less hot version of the sauce. I also love the taste of the "Real" hot sauce, but the Sweet Papaya Mustard was great in almost ketchup-like quantities on chicken sandwiches and the like. Something like that would be dangerous with the hot sauce. Thanks again! Might try my hand at Googling again, see if I can find what you found...

 

Ah, so I did another Google search, this time with quotes around "Sweet Papaya Mustard" and found a "Massachusetts Specialty Products Directory" from 1995 that lists all the Inner Beauty products at the time, which include the Hot sauce, Real Hot Sauce, Sweet Papaya Mustard and Blue Marlin Fish Sauce, which I had forgotten about (and didn't use much). Have now confirmed it wasn't all in my head. Now I'm curious if there is any way to find out what the ingredients were in the Sweet Papaya Mustard. I imagine not. Who ran the Inner Beauty company back then? Was it Chris Schlesinger...?

 

That is the name I've heard. Don't know him personally. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I finally got my hands on a bottle of the current "Todd's Inner Beauty" version. And I'm glad to say that it's really good. It tastes much more like I remember the Inner Beauty REAL Hot Sauce tasting, which I preferred to their regular Hot Sauce. In the intervening years I had searched various boards around the web for what people had considered the closest other commercially available hot sauces in flavor to the original Inner Beauty sauces. The ones that were repeatedly mentioned were Rasta Fire Hot Hot Hot, and Lottie's Yellow. The Rasta Fire was actually fairly close to what I remembered and quite good, with a notable habanero/Scotch Bonnet flavor to it. The Lottie's was more specifically mustardy and less integrated than I remembered the Inner Beauty (or the Rasta Fire). Lottie's does also make a red version called "Original" that has no mustard, but I haven't tried that, as it seemed a different style. 

 

Anyway, since I now have the Lottie's and the new Todd's Inner Beauty, I was able to do a side by side taste test, and for me the Todd's Inner Beauty is the clear winner. It's very balanced, with a bit of sweetness (presumably from the papaya and tropical fruit elements), and the mustard works as part of the whole without dominating. The Lottie's is good, but definitely more of a mustard sauce, and to my palate not nearly as special or as versatile. The Todd's is quite hot, and much closer to the former Inner Beauty Real Hot vs Inner Beauty regular. I feel like I successfully time traveled. I highly suggest getting some of the Todd's Inner Beauty, which can be had on Amazon (shipped from Todd's) or directly from Todd's on the web. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I learned about Todd's here and as a lover of good hot sauce, I ordered a bottle.  It is the best I’ve ever tasted.

i now have two more bottles on order, I want to put it on everything.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By Sheel
      Prawn Balchao is a very famous Goan pickle that has a sweet, spicy and tangy flavor to it. 
      For the balchao paste you will need:
      > 8-10 kashmiri red chillies
      > 4-5 Byadagi red chillies
      > 1/2 tsp cumin seeds
      > 1/2 tsk turmeric powder 
      > 1 tsp peppercorn
      > 6 garlic cloves
      > 1/2 tsp cloves
      > 1 inch cinnamon stick
      > Vinegar 
      First you will need to marinate about 250 grams of prawns in some turmeric powder and salt. After 15 minutes deep fry them in oil till them become golden n crisp. Set them aside and add tsp vinegar to them and let it sit for 1 hour. Now, make a paste of all the ingredients mentioned under the balchao paste and make sure not to add any water. In the same pan used for fryin the prawns, add in some chopped garlic and ginger. Lightly fry them and immediately add one whole chopped onion. Next, add the balchao paste amd let it cook for 2-3 minutes. Add in the prawns and cook until the gravy thickens. Finally add 1 tsp sugar and salt according to your taste. Allow it to cool. This can be stored in a glass jar. Let this mature for 1-3 weeks before its use. Make sure never to use water at any stage. This can be enjoyed with a simple lentil curry and rice.
    • By sartoric
      I make this a lot. Traditionally served with dosa, but great with all kinds of Indian food, even just scooped up with bread or pappads for a snack. Although it's slightly different every time, depending on the tomatoes and chillies used, plus the strength of the tamarind, it's easy, quick to make and always delicious.
       
      In a blender - half a medium red onion chopped, 7 dried red chillies broken up a bit, 2 ripe tomatoes chopped, 1 tsp of sea salt, 3 tsp tamarind paste.

       
      Whizz until purée like about 2 minutes.

       
      In a sauté pan over medium heat add 60 ml sesame oil (gingelly), when it's hot but not smoking add 1 tsp black mustard seeds.   

       
      Quickly cover the pan to prevent escape and sizzle for a minute.

       
      Add 1 tsp of urad dal (black lentils, skinned and split they are light grey).

       
      Fry until golden, another minute or so.

       
      Throw in about 20 curry leaves. These splatter so cover the pan again. 

       
      Lower the heat and add the  blender contents.

       
      Simmer, stirring frequently for about 10 minutes, until you get a runny jam consistency.
       
      Ta da !

    • By HoneyMustard
      Pennstation's Honey Mustard taste so good, but they don't sell it in stores like Big Boy Frisch's sells their tartar sauce.

      I am assuming they buy it in bulk from a certain name brand. Does anyone know what that brand is or at least a similar Honey Mustard recipe?
    • By Darienne
      Pannukakku has become a new favorite in the McAuley household. (LCBO Food & Wine, winter season 2016).  We've been using Maple Syrup...made with DH's help in a local sugar shack...but the recipe actually calls for birch syrup.

      Does anyone know where to buy it in Ontario?  Any grocery stores carry it?  Specialty stores?  Toronto? What about in the Cambridge/Kitchener/Waterloo area?
       
      Thanks.
    • By cyalexa
      Salsa Para Enchiladas  
      3 ancho chiles
      2 New Mexico chiles
      2 chipotle chiles
      1 clove garlic, sliced
      2 TB flour
      2 TB vegetable oil
      1 tsp vinegar
      ¾ tsp salt
      ¼ tsp dried oregano
      2 cups broth, stock, or (filtered) chili soaking liquid
      Rinse, stem and seed chiles. Place in saucepan and cover with water. Bring to boil. Cover and remove from heat and let soften and cool. While the chiles are cooling, gently sauté garlic slices in oil until they are soft and golden brown. Remove the garlic from the oil, with a slotted spoon and reserve. Make a light roux by adding the flour to the oil and sautéing briefly. Drain the chilies and puree them with the garlic slices and half of the liquid. Strain the puree back into the saucepan. Pour the remainder of the liquid through the sieve to loosen any remaining chili pulp. Add the roux to the saucepan and whisk to blend. Add the rest of the ingredients to the pan, bring to a boil then and simmer 15-20 minutes. Taste and add additional salt and vinegar if necessary.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×