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jturn00

Airbrush for chocolate

36 posts in this topic

Hi! I emailed Badger and asked about the safety of the compressor can for food and they do not recommend using it for food products. Thank you somuch for warning me. I clearly remember seeing a N.Love demo in which he used the can!!! I will have to order the compressor- I need so many things to start up a little business!!!

Lior

You're quite welcome.

You know, this raises an issue that really bugs me. You see these guys on TV who are telling people Hey, just run out to the hardware store and pick up this and that and make chocolate with it! Isn't it pretty!!!!

But you know, it's really NOT safe. I think it's our obligation, as cooks and confectioners, to be extra cautious when dealing with the health of our clients.


John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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Here is an email from Badger:

Many a chocolatier are using Badger's 100LG (gravity feed) Medium airbrush for decorating their creations. A gravity feed airbrush allows you to spray close to your work at a lower pressure...providing a tight line control, as well as the versatility of a 2" spray pattern.

I'd recommend Badger's # 180-10 diaphragm compressor with the # 50-053 regulator, which will allow you to adjust the airflow to the desired pressure.

Lior, I would suggest that you get a Michaels coupon and buy the compressor thru them. I know at a Michaels store in my city they carry that specific compressor so I am holding out for a 50% off coupon. Not too many people have any use for a compressor so it should be available when I'm ready to buy! I am assuming you live in North America.

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Hello! OOOOH! I am sooo jealous of those of you who live in north America-everything is so accesible- and believe me, cheaper. I ordered the badger 250, had it shipped here, paid customs, taxes and a security tax and it was not inexpensive after all that. So now I will order a compressor... Even the chefrubber colors, the natural ones, were a hassle to get. C'est la vie, I should not complain-sorry! I am still learning, I am quite new, and the process takes longer as it is hard to obtain the items. I just adore this forum, there is such sharing and help!

Thanks so much for everything-everyone.

Lior

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Hi !! I am back from a lovely course in Belgium with Jean Pierre Wybauw!! I enjoyed it a lot and learned much and improved- or at least now I will know what to practice in order to improve!

Anyway, I have the Badger 250-4 and I need a compressor. At Badger they told me that their 180-10 and 180-12 suit. They run at around 180$ t0 268$ . I was wondering if other compressors suit? I was told that at a hobby store called Michaels, they have coupons with 40-50% discounts on compressors. I could have a relative of mine who lives in the states pick one up for me, but HOW DO I KNOW WHat will suit my little airbrush? Does anyone know anything?

Thanks!!


Edited by Lior (log)

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Hi !! I am back from a lovely course in Belgium with Jean Pierre Wybauw!! I enjoyed it a lot and learned much and improved- or at least now I will know what to practice in order to improve!

Anyway, I have the Badger 250-4 and I need a compressor. At Badger they told me that their 180-10 and 180-12 suit. They run at around 180$ t0 268$ . I was wondering if other compressors suit? I was told that at a hobby store called Michaels, they have coupons with 40-50% discounts on compressors. I could have a relative of mine who lives in the states pick one up for me, but HOW DO I KNOW WHat will suit my little airbrush? Does anyone know anything?

Thanks!!

You'll have to share your Wybauw experiences with us... I think there's a thread elsewhere about him teaching. :smile:

I have a (similar) Badger 250-3. I bought a 180-10 compressor off of eBay for around $55 before shipping. If you bid carefully you (or your friend in the US) might be able to do similarly well. There is a Michaels in my neighborhood but even with the bi-weekly 40% off coupons, eBay worked out better.

And on my first try, I did get (white) chocolates with that showroom finish, but I was keeping it simple. :raz:


Edited by Nyago123 (log)

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Oh! Sounds good. I need 220V, but perhaps I can find it on ebay. I asume yours is 110? I didn't post anything about my course because there is a thread on it and I did not want to repeat or bore... And my photography is not too great. But I will be happy to post if you still want.

Thanks for the info!


Edited by Lior (log)

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Oh! Sounds good. I need 220V, but perhaps I can find it on ebay. I asume yours is 110? I didn't post anything about my course because there is a thread on it and I did not want to repeat or bore... And my photography is not too great. But I will be happy to post if you still want.

Thanks for the info!

I'd love it if you'd post about your Wybauw experience. There are always new things to learn.

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Oh! Sounds good. I need 220V, but perhaps I can find it on ebay. I asume yours is 110? I didn't post anything about my course because there is a thread on it and I did not want to repeat or bore... And my photography is not too great. But I will be happy to post if you still want.

Thanks for the info!

Ah, yes, mine is 110V... didn't think about that. But I hope you can find it. The compressor does make a little putt-putt noise, but nothing so bad that I'd be afraid to use it late at night even in an apartment complex. A big compressor is liable to be loud.

Of course, I learned that even with a "work box" to do the spraying in, it's probably better to do it outdoors. A fine mist of cocoa butter & white chocolate floated through the air as I was working. :rolleyes:

Thanks for posting your Wybauw pictures. I even learned something about the dipping fork from it. :biggrin:

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Oh! Sounds good. I need 220V, but perhaps I can find it on ebay. I asume yours is 110? I didn't post anything about my course because there is a thread on it and I did not want to repeat or bore... And my photography is not too great. But I will be happy to post if you still want.

Thanks for the info!

Ah, yes, mine is 110V... didn't think about that. But I hope you can find it. The compressor does make a little putt-putt noise, but nothing so bad that I'd be afraid to use it late at night even in an apartment complex. A big compressor is liable to be loud.

Of course, I learned that even with a "work box" to do the spraying in, it's probably better to do it outdoors. A fine mist of cocoa butter & white chocolate floated through the air as I was working. :rolleyes:

Thanks for posting your Wybauw pictures. I even learned something about the dipping fork from it. :biggrin:

And as Kerry said on another thread, that cocoa butter mist is probably not something you want in your lungs.


John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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