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Natto


chopjwu12
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Kirizai! I never knew it under that name, but that's how I learned to eat natto when I first ventured out of kansai to the slimy plains of Kanto!

I have just confirmed that kirizai is a local dish of the Uonuma district in Niigata. (I should have done that earlier.)

Kirizai is written as きりざい in katakana. (I thought it was written as 切り材.)

You can view a photo of kirizai here (pdf file)

http://www.naash.go.jp/kenko/kankou/pdf/ji...jiba-okazu3.pdf

(Japanese only)

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Do you add sugar to your natto?

I never do, but some Japanese do!

To learn more about this topic, visit http://weekend.nikkei.co.jp/kiko/map/soy_sugar/map.html

Orange (brown?): Prefecture with 10% or more of its residents adding sugar.

Light blue: Prefecture with less than 10% of its residents adding sugar.

White (beige?): Prefecture with none of its residents adding sugar.

To find the exact percentage of those who do, first click the area containing the prefecture of interest, then the prefecture, and a pie chart appears, the white sector indicating those who don't and the orange one those who do.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I just bought a package of natto with a light kombu type sauce. And the natto was all chopped up too...i actually prefer the whole beans versus the chopped. Seems like this brand or style of serving made the whole eating experience seem less natto like with the smell and texture. The sauce was A LOT sweeter than what I'm used to, I think it'd be good tossed with dried slivered seaweed and udon noodles.

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I just bought a package of natto with a light kombu type sauce. And the natto was all chopped up too...i actually prefer the whole beans versus the chopped. Seems like this brand or style of serving made the whole eating experience seem less natto like with the smell and texture. The sauce was A LOT sweeter than what I'm used to, I think it'd be good tossed with dried slivered seaweed and udon noodles.

You mean hikiwari natto, right?

I am no fan of hikiwari natto. My children (8 and 5) still crave for it sometimes. According to this webpage,

http://www.mizkangroup.co.jp/newsrelease/2...ews/020617.html

(Japanese only)

hikiwari natto is liked by homemakers and young people including small children, and it accounts for 5% of the natto market.

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  • 1 month later...
  • 2 months later...

Kizami Natto no Ao-jiso Age: shiso-wrapped Natto tempura, a recipe from a Shojin Ryori (vegetarian Buddhist monk food) book I recently found.

Before frying: the natto was minced, mixed with a dab of karashi, and wrapped in a shiso leaf:

ShisoNatto1.jpg

After very briefly frying in a (too thin) tempura batter:

ShisoNatto.jpg

Well.....it still tasted like natto...I still think my shiso plants are weak, even though i used the youngest leaves this time.

Also shown is yamato-imo no nori-maki: grated mountain yam rolled in a piece of nori and fried until lightly golden brown, then rolled in a shoyu-ginger sauce, which was pretty good! A nice new way to enjoy yamaimo!

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After reviewing this thread I have seen that Natto is frequently eaten for breakfast and is considered good for lowering cholesterol. Are there any other health benefits or positive side effects? Would you say that Natto is good for ones energy like gensing? Does it act like an aphrodisiac (as gensing is purported to)? How does it compare, in this regard, to other sticky cuisine, such as okura, mountain yam/potato?

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Thanks for the link on Nattokinase. I hadn't heard of it.

Another question: I have read that Natto may be mixed with fresh raw egg, as well as soy sauce and mustard. It there a particular type and quantity/proportion of mustard that one should use (I hesitate to mix Natto with New York style deli mustard).

Edited by mascarpone (log)
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Thanks for the link on Nattokinase. I hadn't heard of it.

Another question: I have read that Natto may be mixed with fresh raw egg, as well as soy sauce and mustard. It there a particular type and quantity/proportion of mustard that one should use (I hesitate to mix Natto with New York style deli mustard).

The mustard you should use is karashi, the Japanese mustard. Most packs of natto come with a small pack of it included. Add it it to taste, I probably like my natto spicier than most people... :biggrin:

Also I don't use a whole egg just the yolk.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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gallery_16375_5_132467.jpg

I usually use the packets of mustard and natto sauce that come with the pack of natto, and add some additional sauce (store-bought noodle soup, not shown in the photo).

For packs of natto without a packet of mustard, I use the mustard tube, shown on the left in the photo.

I don't like adding eggs to my natto, but I know there are some who do.

According to this questionnaire survey, 87% of the respondents say that they use the supplied natto sauce for seasoning and 50% soy sauce; and 63% use "shredded negi (leek) as a condiment and 33% use raw eggs.

To my surprise, 69% say they eat natto for dinner, 48% for breakfast, and 29% for lunch. The Japanese are changing! :blink:

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I don't know if I've said this before... but I used to fry natto on a yakiniku grill (on the portable gas burner) with small pieces of bacon. The flavor is lovely, you get some nice charring all around.

But the smell is horrific.

I did this in the days when I was single. My husband would never let me do this now.... He doesn't even like to kiss me after I've eaten natto :biggrin:

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I don't know if I've said this before... but I used to fry natto on a yakiniku grill (on the portable gas burner) with small pieces of bacon.  The flavor is lovely, you get some nice charring all around.

But the smell is horrific. 

Is the natto directly on the grill or wrapped in the bacon?

natto and bacon..... I used to think bacon good went with everything, but I had never considered natto before. :blink:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

The other night I had a strange craving for natto so I whipped it up with some sliced okra and a handful of shiso (it is growing wild this year in my backyard...) and it was great! I am going to start putting shiso in my natto everytime from now on!

I have tried the packs of natto that have the shiso flavored saucebut it can't compare to the taste of fresh.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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I just heard of natto for the first time, and have yet to try it. I think that the following link, though, is a thorough, well-written introduction:

Chaka Kahn! (I can't use "clickety," it's already been done).

Frau Farbissma: "It's a television commercial! With this cartoon leprechaun! And all of these children are trying to chase him...Hey leprechaun! Leprechaun! We want to get your lucky charms! Haha! Oh, and there's all these little tiny bits of marshmallow just stuck right in the cereal so that when the kids eat them, they think, 'Oh this is candy! I'm having fun!'"
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  • 2 months later...
At the Imaiya restaurant (site of Tokyo egullet first ever get together) part of our final course included natto, it was actually a mix of two different kinds of natto, one from the Kanda area of Tokyo  and the other from Yamagata.

The Yamagata natto was called shio (salt)  natto and it was flavored as well as having the additions of konbu and kouji.

My husband fell in love with this stuff and our wonderful waitress kindly answered all of our questions and even went back to the kitchen to bring us the package to show us what the bag looked like.

The first thing my husband did when he got home was look it up on the internet and we found it:

http://www.rakuten.co.jp/toichiya/434914/434975/

I have been unable to find this shio natto anywhere near my house..

Last summer a friend brought back a couple packs after visiting family in Yamagata, but last week my MIL brought over 6 packs that she found at a depachika near our house. They were having a special fair with foods from Yamagata.

Last night I mixed it with a bit of boiled melokhiya, tossed it with soem soy sauce and karashi and put it all on top of tofu.

gallery_6134_1003_25078.jpg

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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