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St. Germain


Nathan
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two iced down rocks glasses.

2 oz Mitcher's Rye (US1-4yo)

1 oz St. Gemain

2-3 "healthy dashes" of Peychaud's Bitters

The Sazerac is one of my favorite cocktails, and I've tried several of the suggestions here for uses of St. Germain (and enjoyed every one of them). This looks like another one well worth giving a try! Thanks.

Mike

"The mixing of whiskey, bitters, and sugar represents a turning point, as decisive for American drinking habits as the discovery of three-point perspective was for Renaissance painting." -- William Grimes

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two iced down rocks glasses.

2 oz Mitcher's Rye (US1-4yo)

1 oz St. Gemain

2-3 "healthy dashes" of Peychaud's Bitters

The Sazerac is one of my favorite cocktails, and I've tried several of the suggestions here for uses of St. Germain (and enjoyed every one of them). This looks like another one well worth giving a try! Thanks.

let me know what you think...

any votes on a name? or does it already have one?

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two iced down rocks glasses.

2 oz Mitcher's Rye (US1-4yo)

1 oz St. Gemain

2-3 "healthy dashes" of Peychaud's Bitters

The Sazerac is one of my favorite cocktails, and I've tried several of the suggestions here for uses of St. Germain (and enjoyed every one of them). This looks like another one well worth giving a try! Thanks.

let me know what you think...

any votes on a name? or does it already have one?

I've been having my own bit of fun with St. Germain for the past couple of months, and I tried this one over the weekend...I think it was Monday actually, the day you posted. As Brinza said, the Sazarac is one of my favorite cocktails and this certainly sounded like a good combo.

It was maybe my favorite use for the St. Germain yet. The play of the St. Germain with the Pernod was really intriguing. I do like it in a Manhattan as described upthread, but I think maybe the Sazarac was better. Possibly more research is needed to come to a definative conclusion !!! :wink::biggrin:

Thanks for posting this, it's in my repertoire now for sure. And I'll cast my vote for the St. Saz.

--Roberta--

"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley

Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

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  • 2 weeks later...

Stumbled across another interesting St. Germain combination from the weekend that someone with more ingredients on hand may want to play with - equal parts St. Germain and Domaine de Canton ginger liqueur. The Domaine de Canton's got quite a bit of gingery burn to it - the St. Germain mellows that out very nicely, and the Domaine de Canton keeps the St. Germain from getting too cloying.

Unfortunately, this happened at a party to which I took the Domaine de Canton as a gift/contribution, so I now am going to have to go out and buy bottles of both (and a new cabinet to store the rapidly expanding pile of stuff) if I want to experiment further.

"Tea and cake or death! Tea and cake or death! Little Red Cookbook! Little Red Cookbook!" --Eddie Izzard
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A few weeks ago I had an excellent cocktail at Death & Co called the Celine Fizz. Based on the menu, and a bit of trial and error on my part, this is my guess at the recipe:

1.5 Plymouth

1 grapefruit juice

.5 lemon juice

.5 St. Germain

1 egg white

orange bitters

The aromatic character of the grapefruit really complements the St. Germain. You can also make this without the egg white but I think the fizz is particularly good at amplifying the aromatics of the drink.

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My local liquor store, (in bumble-foo NJ) never ceases to amaze me and they always have at least 1 dusty bottle left of whatever I'm looking for (and a good selection of Ryes!). I picked up a bottle of St. Germain yesterday. I'm not very good at experimenting with my own cocktails quite yet, but will be searching around (and in this thread) for some cocktails. I'm a rye guy so I might try the sazerac above.

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A few weeks ago I had an excellent cocktail at Death & Co called the Celine Fizz. Based on the menu, and a bit of trial and error on my part, this is my guess at the recipe:

1.5 Plymouth

1 grapefruit juice

.5 lemon juice

.5 St. Germain

1 egg white

orange bitters

The aromatic character of the grapefruit really complements the St. Germain. You can also make this without the egg white but I think the fizz is particularly good at amplifying the aromatics of the drink.

We do it as an up drink, but that formula is broadly similar to one that's been relatively popular for us lately:

Dos Hermanos

1 oz Blanco tequila (we're using Herradura)

.5 oz Reposado (I like the Corralejo)

.5-.75 St. Germain

juice of 1/2 lime

juice of 1/8 grapefruit

dash grenadine

Shake, strain, up

I kind of feel like a tad of aperol might be the ticket here, but we don't stock it at work.

-Andy

Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

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How much is the juice of 1/8 of a grapefruit? Doesn't that vary widely?

It averages out, in my experience, to a generous ounce. It does vary, but measurements like that are how I actually make the drinks, and the variation doesn't have a tremendous impact on the flavor or balance. Cutting a grapefruit into 1/8 sections by halving a quarter cross-wise (the peel ends up roughly triangular) is the easiest way for me to keep the grapfruit fresh and useful. This being Texas, the grapefruit should of course be a Rio Grande Ruby Red.

Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

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  • 2 weeks later...

I just want to say that The Marguerita --

I made a batch of Tequila por Mi Amante after reading about it on Cocktail Chronicles, and tried it in a standard 3:2:1 Margarita (delicious), but then decided to give it a try substituting the St. Germain for the Cointreau. Fruity, floral, and dangerously smooth.  For the next round I mixed the Amante with a bit of reposado, just to get a bit of peppery tequila bite.

1 oz Tequila por Mi Amante

1/2 Tequila reposado

1 oz St. Germain

1/2 oz lime juice

Shake, strain, sip contentedly.

-- is one of the greatest sours ever invented. Each time I make it I am in awe, sir.

Chris Amirault

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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  • 1 month later...

Picked up a bottle of Ikea elderberry syrup when in Seattle last week and just compared it to the mini-bottle of St. Germaine I picked up a while back. They are very different IMO. Interestingly the St. Germaine tasted sweeter and had sort of a melon flavor to me. The Ikea syrup was more acidic with less of a flower taste. I'd have to say that the St. Germaine taste was more interesting but both should be mixable. Needless to say, the Ikea price is more attractive.

Oh, and thanks Chris, the New Old Fashioned is quite tasty but I had to sub in Peychaud's bitters.

It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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  • 2 weeks later...
I just want to say that The Marguerita --
I made a batch of Tequila por Mi Amante after reading about it on Cocktail Chronicles, and tried it in a standard 3:2:1 Margarita (delicious), but then decided to give it a try substituting the St. Germain for the Cointreau. Fruity, floral, and dangerously smooth.  For the next round I mixed the Amante with a bit of reposado, just to get a bit of peppery tequila bite.

1 oz Tequila por Mi Amante

1/2 Tequila reposado

1 oz St. Germain

1/2 oz lime juice

Shake, strain, sip contentedly.

-- is one of the greatest sours ever invented. Each time I make it I am in awe, sir.

This really does sound good -- even on paper. I'm going to have to get working on a batch of the Tequila por Mi Amante. See you in three weeks after the tequila is done. Can't wait.

"A woman once drove me to drink and I never had the decency to thank her" - W.C. Fields

Thanks, The Hopry

http://thehopry.com/

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This really does sound good -- even on paper.  I'm going to have to get working on a batch of the Tequila por Mi Amante.  See you in three weeks after the tequila is done.  Can't wait.

A word of caution (or two, actually):

Though I'm still seeing beautiful looking strawberries at my local farmer's market, I've found when doing infusions that if the fruit is less than perfect, the infusion tends to highlight the imperfections. Test the fruit first, and if they're not sweet and delicious, I'd advise holding out until they are.

And, the recipe above worked for my 2007 batch of TPMA. This year's batch was quite a bit sweeter, so I found that a 50/50 blend of the TPMA/Reposado worked better. So, use the above a guide, and adjust accordingly. Also, I found that adding a quarter ounce or so of very tart grapefruit juice is a nice touch.

"Martinis should always be stirred, not shaken, so that the molecules lie sensuously one on top of the other." - W. Somerset Maugham

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  • 2 months later...

Right then. Here we are nearly 2 years after the first post about this.

And here I am, a Quebecer under the control of the state liquor board, which STILL doesn't stock St. Germain! But my luggage carried a small stash home from vacation for me. Tonight I did up a Champagne cocktail and my tastebuds cried. They CRIED, egulleters!

SAQ: Release me from your tyranny!!!

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Speaking of Champagne cocktails with St. Germain, I made up a French 75 variant for a party this past weekend.

.75 oz. gin (I used Tanqueray)

.75 oz. St. Germain

.5 oz. fresh lemon

Shake and strain into a cocktail flute. Top with champagne. Optional: Garnish with a lemon twist. These were quite refreshing on a freakishly warm March afternoon...

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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Speaking of Champagne cocktails with St. Germain, I made up a French 75 variant for a party this past weekend.

.75 oz. gin (I used Tanqueray)

.75 oz. St. Germain

.5 oz. fresh lemon

Shake and strain into a cocktail flute.  Top with champagne.  Optional: Garnish with a lemon twist.  These were quite refreshing on a freakishly warm March afternoon...

Katie,

I'm sure there were a lot of smiling people in that room! It's funny, because I was tempted to do that very French 75 twist today, but I thought the better of it so I could better enjoy my ever-so-tiny stash. I've read your posts before and am always impressed by your enthusiasm and vast knowledge of spirits. Maybe you can tell me more about the flavour profile of St. Germain. I've only had the chance to taste 50 mL of the stuff (more than half of that in the cocktail) so I'm still a little fuzzy... I'm going to go reread the thread, and relive past glories!

Edited by rubyred (log)
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rubyred:

Thank you so much for the kind words. I'd describe the St Germain as a less-sweet-than-usual liqueur that's well balanced with acidity and that has a not-too-cloying floral aspect. But I'd certainly check the St. Germain website for their description and the accolades of various members of the Cocktail Mafia, whose opinions carry a bit more weight than mine.

I know how it feels to hoard something you think you can't ever get more of. Been there, done that a bunch of times. Can you have a bottle shipped to you? Or shipped to a friend that's overdue for a visit?? Perhaps shipping is available to a <*cough*> neighboring state or province where you could pick it up? There has to be some way for you to get your hands on it. Necessity is the mother of invention. I've seen retailers turn a blind eye and ship plain brown boxes labelled "gourmet supplies" or whatever, to locales that ought not to be getting them. It isn't radioactive materials or bomb making supplies, ferchissakes! I think if you make some discreet email inquiries and befriend the shipping manager at a major retail outlet that ships to other places, they might hook you up. I know the international thing is tough, but perhaps a friend in another (non-controlled) province has a good relationship with their local store manager? There has to be a way.

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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  • 2 months later...

I made this Negroni plus one again, using Plymouth, wondering whether I had been off base the first time. Nope.

Quatroni

3/4 oz gin (Plymouth)

3/4 oz Punt e Mes

3/4 oz Campari

3/4 oz St. Germain

This is one of those drinks that is transformed by a fat, flaming orange twist. Oh my.

Chris Amirault

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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Chris:

Will most definitely be giving the Quatroni a test drive as soon as the bar at work is stocked. I might have to steal that and give you proper attribution in return (as well as a few drinks next time you visit, of course, of course). It sounds delicious!

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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I made my forst Daisy tonight. and Brandy Daisy. any thoughts on using St. Germain in a Daisy of some sort?

Cheers,

Craig

During lunch with the Arab leader Ibn Saud, when he heard that the king’s religion forbade smoking and alcohol, Winston Churchill said: "I must point out that my rule of life prescribed as an absolutely sacred rite the smoking of cigars and also the drinking of alcohol before, after, and if need be during all meals and in the intervals between them." Ibn Saud relented and the lunch went on with both alcohol & cigars.

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I made my forst Daisy tonight. and Brandy Daisy. any thoughts on using St. Germain in a Daisy of some sort?

Cheers,

Craig

If you use the Harry Johnson Daisy formula and sub the St. Germaine for the Yellow Chartreuse I could see it working very well indeed.

Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

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OT for a thread about St. Germain (which I like well enough), but the posts above about Tequila por Mi Amante have me very interested. Any suggestions on brand/bottling of tequila to use? Or even just thoughts on blanco vs. reposado (I'm assuming anejo would be right out)?

Cheers,

Mike

"The problem with the world is that everyone is a few drinks behind."

- Bogart

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OT for a thread about St. Germain (which I like well enough), but the posts above about Tequila por Mi Amante have me very interested.  Any suggestions on brand/bottling of tequila to use?  Or even just thoughts on blanco vs. reposado (I'm assuming anejo would be right out)?

The past two years I used Sauza Hornitos reposado (very reasonably priced at Trader Joe's), and was very happy with the results. This year, I did a few things differently. First, I gilded the lily a bit on the choice of strawberries. A few months ago I went to a panel discussion sponsored by Slow Foods LA on local farmer's markets and organic produce, and everyone on the panel was raving about one grower, Harry's Berries. So that's who I bought my strawberries from this year - organic Gaviotas at $5 per basket. About $2 per basket more than the average, yes, but absolutely THE BEST strawberries I've ever tasted. Secondly, I used a blanco, the Hacienda de Chihuahua sotol (I was seduced by the pretty bottle, and delighted with the price), and then topped it off with a cup or so of Cazadores reposado, for no other reason than to fill the jar. Without question, the best batch yet.

"Martinis should always be stirred, not shaken, so that the molecules lie sensuously one on top of the other." - W. Somerset Maugham

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