Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Turning chocolate into chips/chunks


Fat Guy
 Share

Recommended Posts

Assume somebody gives me a 5kg block of Callebaut 70-30-38Basis. Assume further that I wish to make a zillion chocolate chip/chunk cookies. What's the best way to convert the chocolate into chips or chunks?

By "best" I mean easiest for a lazy amateur with no special equipment. But of course academically I'm interested in other approaches.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

food processor on pulse

Assume somebody gives me a 5kg block of Callebaut 70-30-38Basis. Assume further that I wish to make a zillion chocolate chip/chunk cookies. What's the best way to convert the chocolate into chips or chunks?

By "best" I mean easiest for a lazy amateur with no special equipment. But of course academically I'm interested in other approaches.

nkaplan@delposto.com
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Seeing as I just tried this last night...I have to agree that the food processor IS NOT the way to go. I wasted a fairly decent amount of dark chocolate - which I wanted to use as chips in some cupcakes. So, FatGuy, thanks for posting and I eagerly await an answer.

Whoever said that man cannot live by bread alone...simply did not know me.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

food processor on pulse

I was sort of hoping for "I'll come over and do it for you."

Is there a trick to this, like refrigerating or starting with a certain size chunks?

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anything involving chocolate under my arm and a bread knife is way too ambitious for me.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have tried the "under the armpit" technique and do not like it. Takes too long and a little too dangerous given my propensity to be clumsy. The following technique has been amazing successful, to my great surprise.

First, I cut open the wrapping and pull out the block of chocolate until the score lines are visible. Each section weighs about 1 lb. Then I take a clean Chinese cleaver (mine has a pretty thick blade) and a really, really heavy mallet with a metal head. I place the cleaver on the scored line of the chocolate and whack it with the mallet. One or two good whacks breaks it apart very cleanly. Once the large block is broken into smaller sections, I wrap each loosely in plastic film (to keep bits of chocolate from flying all over the place) and start whacking it into smaller pieces. Once the pieces get to about 1-2 inch chunks, they can usually be cut into smaller chunks with the cleaver alone or a knife. The chocolate block should be cool, but refrigeration is not needed.

Ilene

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used to work with a pastry chef who would leave the 11 lb blocks of chocolate in their original wrapper and climb on top of the walk-in and drop them on the floor. That was enough to get started...the chocolate would be in large chunks and he would chop them smaller from there.

You could also send the chocolate blocks to David Letterman so he could drop them off a 5 story building. :laugh:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Assume somebody gives me a 5kg block of Callebaut 70-30-38Basis. Assume further that I wish to make a zillion chocolate chip/chunk cookies. What's the best way to convert the chocolate into chips or chunks?

By "best" I mean easiest for a lazy amateur with no special equipment. But of course academically I'm interested in other approaches.

I buy Callebaut in those big blocks, and I use a cleaver to chop it off the block. It works really well. A lot of times the cleaver creates a crack in the chocolate before cutting all the way through which allows you to break off a large chunk easily by hand, and then you can use the cleaver to chop that into smaller chunks until you get the size you want.

Edited to add that Beanie, I see, has a bit more refined cleaver method that I do. I just aim, whack, and pile it on my scale until I have the amount I need.

Edited by takomabaker (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used to work with a pastry chef who would leave the 11 lb blocks of chocolate in their original wrapper and climb on top of the walk-in and drop them on the floor. That was enough to get started...the chocolate would be in large chunks and he would chop them smaller from there.

My mother uses a similar technique. She whacks the heck out of one against the edge of her butcher-block baking table. Never warns anybody she's about to do it and scares the heck out of me every time.

But, there are easier methods. I don't have one, but there are such things as chocolate chippers, like this one or this one. I believe I've seen Martha use one on the old cooking show . . . looked like it worked really well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used to work with a pastry chef who would leave the 11 lb blocks of chocolate in their original wrapper and climb on top of the walk-in and drop them on the floor. That was enough to get started...the chocolate would be in large chunks and he would chop them smaller from there.

My mother uses a similar technique. She whacks the heck out of one against the edge of her butcher-block baking table. Never warns anybody she's about to do it and scares the heck out of me every time.

But, there are easier methods. I don't have one, but there are such things as chocolate chippers, like this one or this one. I believe I've seen Martha use one on the old cooking show . . . looked like it worked really well.

That's pretty funny! I always thought they were ice picks. Depending if you are outdoorsy or not you may have an ice pick in your garage you could use.

Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The chipper that Pam linked to is how I learned, but I have a suggestion:

1) Wrap the block in a layer of parchment, then seal it in two freezer bags.

2) Lay the carefully wrapped block crosswise on a 2x4.

3) Drive a mini-van over the block.

4) Back up, returning the mini-van to its starting position.

5) Remove from packaging. Enjoy.

Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Chefpeon's method ain't bad. Stick it in a bag, chill till its brittle and then drop it. If necessary, finish it off with a couple of good whacks with a meat club or mallet. On the other hand, if you splurge and buy a chocolate chipper like Pam suggested (about USD 5-6 retail), you also have a ice chipping tool for cocktail hour. :biggrin:

Edited by priich (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fat Guy, you are simply taking the wrong attitude about this. Just because you don't want to chop up a humungous block of chocolate doesn't mean others wouldn't jump at the chance, if you spin it right.

A friend and I assisted a pastry chef in a chocolate tempering class. We are both chocoholics, and we loved chopping up the blocks of chocolate necessary for the class. I remember my friend gazing in wonder at one 20-lb block of chocolate that she later demolished. You see?

So my suggestion is to invite some friends over for a Chocolate Heaven experience, chopping up your chocolate. They can do the work, and you can serve refreshments.

P.S. If you don't have a chocolate chipper, you can also use the meat fork that comes with a carving set. It's not as efficient, since it's only 2-pronged, but it works fine.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By ShylahSinger
      Hello! I'm fairly new to this site so I don't know if my search was weak. I'm trying to find a way to make Mandarin orange puree at home, but I couldn't find anything even similar in the forum. I am a home cook, but I have been making chocolate bonbons and other confections for over 4 years (intermitantly). It is too expensive for me to purchase this online- not because of the price of the puree, but the cost of shipping makes it prohibative. The recipes I've seen online are all differant and don't seem to be what I need. 
      I would love any help with this! I look forward to hearing and learning from those who have much, much more experience than me. Thanks!
    • By Darienne
      A quite unusual take on the favorite American chocolate bar: click
    • By ShylahSinger
      Help! I am an amateur and make chocolate truffles, bonbons, and caramels for friends and family. I made some soft caramel for filling molded bonbons. The flavor and consistency are fine, but the caramel is filled with bubbles. I don't know how to get the air bubbles out, and am concerned using it in my molded chocolates. I would like to know if it is okay to use. I have been making confections for about four years and this is the first time this has happened. I would really appreciate any help! I'm new to the forum and don't know anyone yet.
    • By rookie
      I am making molded bunnies for Easter and I am finding that the
      necks are cracking and the head breaks away from the body. I have noticed that the neck is not as thick as the rest of the bunny. Total grams for this bunny is 200.
      Does anyone have any suggestions on how to rectify this? Oh yeah I didn't mention that after pouring into molds I place in the refridgerator.
      Any suggestions are welcome!
      Cheers
      Mary - Rookie
    • By cc.canuck
      I couldn't think of a better way to word that! 
       
      I'm experimenting with adding a very small amount of cocoa butter decoration onto bars I'm making and am not sure whether I should heat the moulds up with a hair dryer as I would for completely bare moulds or just abandoning this step. I would avoid blowing directly onto where the cocoa butter is as much as possible. Thoughts?

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...