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Left over roast pig..what to do?


XiaoLing
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So...this weekend before the storm, I made my way to Chinatown and bought enough food to feed a small country. I can't possibly fit any more food into my fridge. I will probably be digging my way out of it for the next 2-3 weeks. :laugh:

I also made a stop at my favorite bbq restaurant and bought way too much food. So, now I'm stuck with about 1 pound of roast pig (not be confused with it's equally tasty counter part - roast pork.)

Since roast pig doesn't really taste good after the day you buy it (the skin is no longer crispy :sad: ), I'm wondering what I can do with it. I know that I can put it in the oven to crisp it up again but then the meat dries out. It's quite a conundrum. :hmmm:

Does anyone have any recipes for cooking with roast pig? Any pointers would be greatly appreciated! :wub:

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My favorite thing to do is to make soup or stew with wintermelon. The roast pork gives the stew nice flavor. The other thing I do is to quick saute the left over pork with a little soy sauce, sugar and maybe some green onion.

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Thank you Anna!

I never thought about using roast pig for soup but I guess why not? I saved my roast duck bones for soup later on, maybe I will also with the roast pig. Darn, I didn't buy any wintermelon, I think that was the only thing I didn't buy. But I'm sure diakon would make a good subsitute. :smile: I'm sure the roast pig will also freeze well enough, at least until I get my hands on some winter melon.

I thought about sauting it with soy and garlic, ginger, green onions too but I didn't know if I was being a little weird or not. :huh:

Does anyone have any other suggestions?

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I would shred some of it and make spring rolls with it or you could make some really interesting dumplings with it as well.

The sauteing idea sounds good too.

Plus you could freeze them for later use if you didn't feel like using them right away.

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I also made a stop at my favorite bbq restaurant and bought way too much food.  So, now I'm stuck with about 1 pound of roast pig (not be confused with it's equally tasty counter part - roast pork.) 

Roast pig, roast pork... what's the difference? What was it that you bought? :hmmm:

W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"
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In the Philippines, leftover roasted pig is turned into a heavenly stew called "Lechon Paksiw".

Lechon Paksiw recipe courtesy of MarketManila blog

Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

"Nobody loves pork more than a Filipino"

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I thought about sauting it with soy and garlic, ginger, green onions too but I didn't know if I was being a little weird or not.  :huh:

Not weird, sounds like perfectly good American food :rolleyes:

I mean American Chinese food

tasty too

Hmm actually toss all that together and heat up the skin separately and slice it over the top

tracey

The great thing about barbeque is that when you get hungry 3 hours later....you can lick your fingers

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Hey Folks!

Here I am in Amsterdam - actually at the seaside resort of Scheveningen. It was 29 C yesterday! We are here as guests of Disney International for the Eueopena opening night of Tarzan the Musical.

Haven't tried any Chinese food here - but we did go to the New King in Amsterdam's Chinatown on Chufi's recommendation. The food was very good but man! the prices are something else!

Back to topic: XiaoLing: Try using the fatty pieces with ham ha. Lay some pieces of the pork on the bottom of a dish, smear some ham ha on top, add slivers of ginger, steam. YUM! The fatter pieces are the best.

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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Try Ah Leung's Roast Pork and Oysters in Clay Pot. Separate the skins and fry them up to a crisp to be used as a garnish on top.

You beat me to it! I was going to say -- shred them and deep-fry them.

But -- as to the original question about what to do with leftover roast pig?? Just fast-ship it to me, and I will take care of it!!

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Thank you all for your suggestions. I really like the suggestion of sauting it and then heat up the skin separately to make it crispy. It sounds like the least amount of work. hehehe. :biggrin:

I think I will freeze it and save it for another time. I have way too much food from Chinatown that will probably spoil within a week. So I have to go into a food binge and just eat and eat! So much for my diet. :laugh:

Roast pig, roast pork... what's the difference?  What was it that you bought?  :hmmm:

LOL....big difference!! Roast pork is the pork strips that are red and the roast pig is the whole pig roasted with crispy skin. But I'm sure Ah Leung is teasing me. :hmmm::smile:

XiaoLing is from Wuhan.  We probably need to explain what "ham ha" is!  :biggrin:

It's true!! I have no idea what ham ha is. Is it Chinese ham?? :huh:

Thank you all again for such great suggestions! I knew you guys would help me out. :wub:

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Not weird, sounds like perfectly good American food  :rolleyes:

I mean American Chinese food

American Chinese food???? That's how we used to heat up left over BBQ in Hong Kong all the time. We use the same method with roast duck, soy chicken, bbq pork, etc. And we had left over BBQ a lot since my late grandfather owned a Cantonese BBQ shop....

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Roast pig, roast pork... what's the difference?  What was it that you bought?   :hmmm:

LOL....big difference!! Roast pork is the pork strips that are red and the roast pig is the whole pig roasted with crispy skin. But I'm sure Ah Leung is teasing me. :hmmm::smile:

Okay... looks like this is just difference in terminologies. Your "roast pork" is what I have commonly seen as "BBQ pork", or "cha siu" in Cantonese.

Left-over roast pig... Cantonese love to use them in clay pot dishes. e.g. Roast pork with oyster clay pot. Roast pork with tofu clay pot.

From my experience, the day-old roast pork skin will no longer be crispy. (Even the same day - after 10 hours or so). I think it will be hard-pressed to resurrect the crispy-ness in the skin. When you cook it, the skin will turn soft. (If you eat in room temperature, the skin will just be chewy.)

XiaoLing is from Wuhan.  We probably need to explain what "ham ha" is!   :biggrin:

It's true!! I have no idea what ham ha is. Is it Chinese ham?? :huh:

"ham ha"... Chinese it is. Ham it isn't. :laugh: It's Cantonese/Toysanese. "ham" = salty, "ha" = shrimp. "ham ha" is referring to the "salty shrimp paste"... the purple-ish kind that smells really fishy! From my observation this sauce is not even known to other Chinese regions except the coastal regions near Canton.

W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"
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Ah Ha! Ham ha....interesting....LOL :laugh:

Thanks Ah Leung. I love it actually. But I have only had it with seafood. My favorite way of eating "ham ha" would be with lightly stir fried sea conch. YUM!

But to steam the pork with ham ha sounds really good too. Oh boy...so much to do with so little pork. I thought I didn't have many choices with so much pork, now I'm beginning to think so little pork with too many choices! hehehe.... :raz:

I think I might stir fry half with chinese leeks, ginger, soy, and garlic like anna suggested and then save the other half for steaming with "ham ha." Thank you Anna and Dejah! :smile:

Thank you all!!

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But to steam the pork with ham ha sounds really good too.  Oh boy...so much to do with so little pork.  I thought I didn't have many choices with so much pork, now I'm beginning to think so little pork with too many choices! hehehe.... :raz:

What we usually do when we visit San Francisco China Town... would buy a couple pound of roast pig (chopped). We pick and eat the skin right away in the car! Crispy and still warm from the roasting oven! Hell... fat and all, heck with it! Because the skin will turn chewy within a short time and turn soft if re-cooked.

The rest, I use them to cook clay pot dishes the next day or two.

W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"
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What we usually do when we visit San Francisco China Town... would buy a couple pound of roast pig (chopped).  We pick and eat the skin right away in the car!  Crispy and still warm from the roasting oven!  Hell... fat and all, heck with it!  Because the skin will turn chewy within a short time and turn soft if re-cooked.

The rest, I use them to cook clay pot dishes the next day or two.

That's what mom usually does, but she waits till we get home. She always make us eat all the skin the day we get the roast pork because it won't be good the next day! I actually like the soggy skin in the stew/soup though....

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You have a very good point there. But I honestly bought so much food that I didn't know where to begin?!

I had a whole roast duck, char shui, roast pig, seafood xo lo mein, seafood satay udon, and who knows what else was in there?? I did eat some skin on my way home. I should have eaten all the skin within an hour though. :hmmm:

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I had leftover roast pork once (It was only once, I swear!). I seperated the skin from the fat from the lean and first rendered the fat bits until they were getting crispy. Then added in the skin to crisp up and then finally tossed in the lean bits to brown slighty. Swirled in a bit of sherry vingar off the heat and a tiny bit of spicy mustard, whisked to combine and then poured it over some greens. Lovely pork salad that totally did justice to the pig.

PS: I am a guy.

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I had leftover roast pork once (It was only once, I swear!). I seperated the skin from the fat from the lean and first rendered the fat bits until they were getting crispy. Then added in the skin to crisp up and then finally tossed in the lean bits to brown slighty. Swirled in a bit of sherry vingar off the heat and a tiny bit of spicy mustard, whisked to combine and then poured it over some greens. Lovely pork salad that totally did justice to the pig.

Sounds awesome Shal! Nice thinking... got a hankering for some green beans with bacon now (or bokchoy/green beans with crispy bbq pork now!)

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  • 1 month later...

So, I finally took some roast duck from my freezer and made some delicious noodle soup from it! :biggrin:

I used only what was left in my fridge, which included only enoki mushrooms. I didn't even have scallions. :shock: But the noodle soup was so good and hit the spot right on! :wub: And it only took like 5 minutes to make! Who needs instant noodles when you have frozen roast duck in your freezer???

The dish could have used more color to make a better presentation but I was hungry. :sad: And there was nothing else in my fridge.

Here's my new favorite noodle soup:

gallery_48325_4009_147673.jpg

Here's a close up of the yumminess! LOL. :smile:

gallery_48325_4009_19235.jpg

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So...this weekend before the storm, I made my way to Chinatown and bought enough food to feed a small country.  I can't possibly fit any more food into my fridge.  I will probably be digging my way out of it for the next 2-3 weeks.  :laugh:

I also made a stop at my favorite bbq restaurant and bought way too much food.  So, now I'm stuck with about 1 pound of roast pig (not be confused with it's equally tasty counter part - roast pork.) 

Since roast pig doesn't really taste good after the day you buy it (the skin is no longer crispy  :sad: ), I'm wondering what I can do with it.  I know that I can put it in the oven to crisp it up again but then the meat dries out.  It's quite a conundrum.  :hmmm:

Does anyone have any recipes for cooking with roast pig? Any pointers would be greatly appreciated!  :wub:

If I have any leftover BBQ I usually saute it with chinese veggies like choy sum, gai lan or gai choy. Tastes especially good with gai choy. The fat of the pork mixed with the slight bitterness of the gai choy matches oh so well. A little bit of roast pork goes a long way, so there's no need to use so much.

Also, sorry to stray off topic here but a popular veggie dish in restos here (I'm in Guangzhou currently) is gai choy with canned dace. Yes, dace with black beans sauteed with gai choy. I was pleasantly surprised when I had it the first time. Once again, a little goes a long way. Maybe a half a dace (I think there are 2 or 3 dace in a can?) is enough.

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Also, sorry to stray off topic here but a popular veggie dish in restos here (I'm in Guangzhou currently) is gai choy with canned dace.

WARNING, all canned dace (oval cans) have been pulled off the grocery shelves in Canada for over a year. I had a terrible time looking for my yearly supply in Toronto last week and after 10 +/- stores, I finally had someone explain the situation to me.

Apparently some aquaculture operations in China were very lax with their operations and used chemicals, biologics and drugs very liberally. Tested cans of the stuff were veritably dangerous to your health.

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