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Vintage aluminum molds, only for the fridge?


thecuriousone
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HI All-

I like to collect vintage aluminum molds when I'm at flea markets and such. Were aluminim molds only meant to go in the freezer? How do you determine what can go in the oven?

I'm assuming that the ones with a lock of some type are only for ice cream or frozen desserts, if that correct?

Thanks for any help. IF there is a book you are aware of that can help me identify them, please let me know. H. Lee

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it would be great if you could post a picture of one or two of them to help us identify the molds.

often, the molds with latches, etc. would have been used for steamed puddings (English style desserts). some other ones were made for paté en croute or other preserved meat type things in a pastry shell.

and some were probably for ice cream and the like.

pictures help.

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Some aluminum molds were made for baking cakes or for chocolate, but some are for gelatins or steaming only. A lock or latch would be used to seal it for retaining moisture, or for making a hollow chocolate mold -- the chocolate ones would usually have a sliding clip.

I second the need for pix...

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Several copper-colored aluminum molds that are shaped similarly to the first few in your photos (fluting, surface designs, etc.) decorate my kitchen walls. They were manufactured in the 1950s as molds for gelatin, and can still be used that way.

A couple of times, I've baked cakes in them, but the cakes stick badly to the indentations even when the molds are heavily greased/floured, and the molds need to be fine-cleaned with a toothpick!

SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

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