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marge201

Favorite Home Coffee Makers 2007-2009

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Go to www.overstock.com, they have the Capresso MT500 Plus for $161.00!  I was torn between buying the Moccamaster CD and the Capresso, I ordered the Capresso yesterday.

Bob R in OKC

Thanks for the good info, Bob. I just read the reviews on this machine at Amazon and one review would have made it a deal-breaker for me:

"The first cup is good but the carafe isn't even an insulated one! Your coffee has gone cold within 20 minutes even after the hastle of running the hot water to preheat the carafe prior to making the coffee every morning. For $150 you think they'd at least provide an insulated carafe!!!"

Let us know if that critique is correct!

Marge

Marge,

The MT500 has a stainless thermal VACUUM carafe with stainless in the inside and outside.

Technically, you could say it isn't insulated but much better.

Tim

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My new Capresso MT500 Plus arrived Friday afternoon via FEDEX 2-day air. I got it unpacked and cleaned up and ran some water thru it. Water temp was about 198F. Took right at 7 minutes for the water to run through. It seems solidly built and it looks nice on the counter! Saturday morning will be the real test! I will make coffee in it for the first time! I'll let you know how that goes!

Bob R in OKC


Bob R in OKC

Home Brewer, Beer & Food Lover!

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My new Capresso MT500 Plus arrived Friday afternoon via FEDEX 2-day air.  I got it unpacked and cleaned up and ran some water thru it.  Water temp was about 198F.  Took right at 7 minutes for the water to run through.  It seems solidly built and it looks nice on the counter!  Saturday morning will be the real test!  I will make coffee in it for the first time!  I'll let you know how that goes!

Bob R in OKC

Sounds great, Bob! Yeah, definitely let us know! Enjoy!

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I'm sitting here enjoying my third cup of coffee from my new machine! Before I go much more let me assure you that I DID READ the MANUAL! (I dont' usually!) I filled the reservoir with cold filtered water. The indicator on the side says the thing holds 10 'cups', but it really holds about 6 CUPS (8 oz cups). I filled the caraffe with hot water and let it sit while I used my Cuisinart burr grinder to grind the coffee (local brand). I filled the gold mesh filter with 10 scoops as suggested in the instructions. The scoop provided seems a bit smaller than others that I have, but that is what I used. I may have set the grind too fine on my grinder too, but that may take some tweeking. I emptied the caraffe of the hot water, securely fastened the lid, placed into position and then pressed the start button!

This machine is very quiet as it brews, with only a soft gurgling noticed. It does hiss a bit at the finish as steam is let off. About 7 minutes after I it started, the coffee is finished! Again, the temp was right about 198F.

The first cup was good, but a bit of metallic flavor was detected. Guess I shoulda run some more cleaning water through. The coffee was good, but not as strong as I was hoping. Next time, I will add more coffee than the manual suggests and also grind a little coarser. There was some sludge in the bottom of the first cup/mug.

Second cup was poured at 25 minutes after the first. The temp of that mug was about 150F, maybe a tad higher. Still plenty hot for me.

The third cup was poured a full hour after the first. The temp of this cup was almost 145F! Still plenty hot for me!

So, except for having to tweek my grind, and maybe using a better coffee, all went well!

It is important to prep the caraffe by heating it up first, a your cup/mug as well. Also, when you brew, the caraffe lid must be fully closed, but when pouring you need to open it a quarter turn. To stay hot, the lid must then be closed again.

Also, though the machine doesn't employ a hot plate to keep the coffee hot (or cook it more!) the water heating element is located under the base where the caraffe sits. so it does get a little warm there, but not hot enough to cook the coffee. The heating element shuts off 2 minutes after the coffee is brewed.

Again, I like this new Capresso MT500 Plus! It looks nice on the counter and is solidly built and seems to brew a decent cup of coffee. I think I'll keep her!

Bob R in OKC


Bob R in OKC

Home Brewer, Beer & Food Lover!

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Bob, for my Capresso MT-500, I use 3/4 cup of roasted beans for a full 50 oz. carafe. I grind to a medium-fine grind and use a paper filter. I grind a little coarser if I use the gold filter. We tend to like our coffee on the strong side.


Regards,

Michael Lloyd

Mill Creek, Washington USA

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Marge-

I currently own a coffee place in Towson, Maryland.

Hope you find a brewer to your liking.

I'm very pleased with the Cuisinart. But I'll admit I have pedestrian taste!

If I lived near you, I'd check our your coffee place!

Marge

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I'm sitting here enjoying my third cup of coffee from my new machine!  Before I go much more let me assure you that I DID READ the MANUAL!  (I dont' usually!)  I filled the reservoir with cold filtered water.  The indicator on the side says the thing holds 10 'cups', but it really holds about 6 CUPS (8 oz cups).  I filled the caraffe with hot water and let it sit while I used my Cuisinart burr grinder to grind the coffee (local brand).  I filled the gold mesh filter with 10 scoops as suggested in the instructions.  The scoop provided seems a bit smaller than others that I have, but that is what I used.  I may have set the grind too fine on my grinder too, but that may take some tweeking.  I emptied the caraffe of the hot water, securely fastened the lid, placed into position and then pressed the start button!

This machine is very quiet as it brews, with only a soft gurgling noticed.  It does hiss a bit at the finish as steam is let off.  About 7 minutes after I it started, the coffee is finished!  Again, the temp was right about 198F.

The first cup was good, but a bit of metallic flavor was detected.  Guess I shoulda run some more cleaning water through.  The coffee was good, but not as strong as I was hoping.  Next time, I will add more coffee than the manual suggests and also grind a little coarser.  There was some sludge in the bottom of the first cup/mug.

Second cup was poured at 25 minutes after the first.  The temp of that mug was about 150F, maybe a tad higher.  Still plenty hot for me.

The third cup was poured a full hour after the first.  The temp of this cup was almost 145F!  Still plenty hot for me!

So, except for having to tweek my grind, and maybe using a better coffee, all went well! 

It is important to prep the caraffe by heating it up first, a your cup/mug as well.  Also, when you brew, the caraffe lid must be fully closed, but when pouring you need to open it a quarter turn.  To stay hot, the lid must then be closed again.

Also, though the machine doesn't employ a hot plate to keep the coffee hot (or cook it more!) the water heating element is located under the base where the caraffe sits.  so it does get a little warm there, but not hot enough to cook the coffee.  The heating element shuts off 2 minutes after the coffee is brewed.

Again, I like this new Capresso MT500 Plus!  It looks nice on the counter and is solidly built and seems to brew a decent cup of coffee.  I think I'll keep her!

Bob R in OKC

Bob,

such an interesting review!! you should post it on amazon, too! thanks for sharing this great info. Enjoy your good coffee!

Marge

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I too need a new pot. I am willing to spend up to about $100 on it. I am comfortable with drip makers and don't really want to get a french press pot right now.

I drink a lot of coffee, but I admit I'm pretty pedestrian in my approach to it. I buy the cheapo beans roasted at Costco. I usually drink a cup hot as soon as it's brewed, but I turn off the pot immediately and as soon as the remainder has cooled to room temp, I stick it into a covered pitcher and put it in the fridge. I drink most of the coffee cold from the fridge, with soymilk and Splenda.

I do have a $40 gift card to Williams-Sonoma, but otherwise no opinion on where to buy something. I'm replacing a Proctor-Silex model given to me by an old friend about 8 years ago, with a restaurant-style glass carafe on it since the original carafe is long gone. I want the new machine to be sturdy enough that I can use it to make a pot of coffee when I cater small dinner parties, and I want the cup it produces to be something I can stand behind. (I buy better beans when I'm entertaining or when I'm hired to cater, and try to grind them fresh at those times, but I only own a really cheap tiny grinder and it seems like a waste of time to me for everyday coffee--am I wrong here?)

Advice welcome.

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Malawry, personally, I think you would like the Cuisinart. I think they are pretty reasonably priced these days.


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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(I buy better beans when I'm entertaining or when I'm hired to cater, and try to grind them fresh at those times, but I only own a really cheap tiny grinder and it seems like a waste of time to me for everyday coffee--am I wrong here?)

Advice welcome.

Yes you're wrong. My coffee setup at home - for about 20 years until I got into espresso - consisted of a cheap little Waring whirly blade grinder that I got as a freebie for a sales spiff when I worked in retail. For the first ten years I used it with a Chemex and also Melitta cones and then when I had to brew larger amounts I switched to a thermal carafe (which I preheated while the coffee was brewing).

Fo years my go-to source for beans was two pound bags of "all arabica French Roast" that I bought at BJ's Wholesale Club. I froze the bag after buying and took out a bit each day to grind at time of brewing.

I was on a pretty serious budget for a long time but you know what? Despite my simple setup my coffee blew away anything that any of my friends ever served at home. And it was also far better than what I could get in local cafes or restaurants at the time. Decent quality reasonably fresh whole beans (which I preserved by freezing) and grinding by the pot were the keys. Thos two thingss are the cheapest, easiest and by far the most significant upgrades one can make to their home coffee process.

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I too need a new pot. I am willing to spend up to about $100 on it. I am comfortable with drip makers and don't really want to get a french press pot right now.

I drink a lot of coffee, but I admit I'm pretty pedestrian in my approach to it. I buy the cheapo beans roasted at Costco. I usually drink a cup hot as soon as it's brewed, but I turn off the pot immediately and as soon as the remainder has cooled to room temp, I stick it into a covered pitcher and put it in the fridge. I drink most of the coffee cold from the fridge, with soymilk and Splenda.

I do have a $40 gift card to Williams-Sonoma, but otherwise no opinion on where to buy something. I'm replacing a Proctor-Silex model given to me by an old friend about 8 years ago, with a restaurant-style glass carafe on it since the original carafe is long gone. I want the new machine to be sturdy enough that I can use it to make a pot of coffee when I cater small dinner parties, and I want the cup it produces to be something I can stand behind. (I buy better beans when I'm entertaining or when I'm hired to cater, and try to grind them fresh at those times, but I only own a really cheap tiny grinder and it seems like a waste of time to me for everyday coffee--am I wrong here?)

Advice welcome.

I've been very happy with the quality of coffee I get from my Melitta. I haven't used this particular unit, but for you I'd probably recommend the MEMB1B Mill & Brew over the Cuisinart. It's ~$57-67 from Amazon, including shipping, and the all-in-one unit would be convenient for you.


Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

 

-The mosque is too far from home, so let's do this / Let's make a weeping child laugh.

    Nida Fazli, poet, 1938-2016 (translated, from the Urdu, by Anu Garg, wordsmith.org)

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We are pretty pedestrian coffee drinkers. We generally purchase the cheapest 10 cup coffee maker on the shelf (just me and hubby here), rag it out, and sort of treat it as a disposable appliance.

So when the latest piece o' junk died yesterday (all steam no coffee, obviously we didn't take care of our $15 investment) I ran across a Hamilton Beach BrewStation on the clearance rack at Wally World for $29. Obviously, they are dumping the model we have, but I saw several others on the shelf ranging from $40 to $100. Here is mine:

gallery_39581_5690_126392.jpg

So after two days use I am pleased with the design. It keeps the coffee fresher, our mugs all fit under the spout, and it has the nifty auto shutoff that everybody wants.

I am wondering why they are discontinuing the bottom line machine? Does anybody have the other models, and how are they?

We think it is pretty nifty, but we are rather pedestrian. The biggest advantage is that I am not sloshing coffee all over the place like that lady in the commercial. I am a two cup minimum before I function. :biggrin:

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During Christmas a large box appeared at our door. Inside with no way of knowing who sent it was a Hamilton Beach BrewStartion Deluxe. Turns out the MIL sent it as a "gift for you" when really she hates our coffee maker - a Cuisinart - and coincidentally we'd just bought a new Cusinart model that same day. In any case she hates all of our small appliances and really sent it for herself when she stays with us for THREE WEEKS upcoming. I just shoved it in the closet they use and she can deal with it when she comes and try to figure out room for it next to my coffee maker. I had read reviews of it and people talked about it malfunctioning and scalding their hands and all when it dispensed so that kind of made me leary. We'll see when she uses it. Love the eGullet mug! Good picture!


"You can't miss with a ham 'n' egger......"

Ervin D. Williams 9/1/1921 - 6/8/2004

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Reviews on the Brewstation have been very mixed -- but as long as you're aware of it's limitations, enjoy it!

So we finish the eighteenth and he's gonna stiff me. And I say, "Hey, Lama, hey, how about a little something, you know, for the effort, you know." And he says, "Oh, uh, there won't be any money. But when you die, on your deathbed, you will receive total consciousness."

So I got that goin' for me, which is nice.

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Wow, they are pretty mixed. I guess I understand why this model was discontinued. They must be working the bugs out.

Still (granted I am only three days in) it has been really nice for us so far. The coffee in my pot stayed hot for about 30 minutes after the auto shutoff. The reservoir is not as sturdy as I would like, and I bet that is where people are springing leaks. I think I could manage not to scald myself even if it did leak, though, and I am known to be clumsy.

Coffee doesn't taste burned even when old.

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I'm a big fan of "coffe flavored coffee", my coffee pot just broke and I was wondering what are people using to brew a good cup of coffee or as us New Yorkers say CAWFEE.


"Leave the gun. Take the cannoli."

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My American style coffee maker broke a few months ago, and I only use my ibrik now. I really want a French press or a moka, but I've found that all of the setups in our price range(trust me, it's LOW) are made in China or are Italian made but made of aluminum, so we're waiting. To be honest about it, I only used the coffeemaker rarely(guess that's how I got it to last since 1987!), most people come over and expect Syrian coffee from me, and I'm not one for anything with a less infused flavor profile than that myself.


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Seeing that most french presses are just pyrex beakers with a strainer and handle, Ikea has one for relatively cheap compared with bodum and other brand names (like half the price of a comparable bodum).

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My American style coffee maker broke a few months ago, and I only use my ibrik now. I really want a French press or a moka, but I've found that all of the setups in our price range(trust me, it's LOW) are made in China or are Italian made but made of aluminum, so we're waiting. To be honest about it, I only used the coffeemaker rarely(guess that's how I got it to last since 1987!), most people come over and expect Syrian coffee from me, and I'm not one for anything  with a less infused flavor profile than that myself.

The Italian aluminum moka pots work well, are inexpensive and commonly used in Italy daily.

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The Italian aluminum moka pots work well,  are inexpensive and commonly used in Italy daily.

I was just about to post a thread then saw this...

Any ideas on which are best? I bought one from Whittard's but it consistently produced terrible coffee (however it was the large model). My parents had one from a few decades back which was very good, but we lost the filter :(

If there's something on Amazon.co.uk or equivalent that delivers coffee with thick crema and full aroma without tasting like molten rubber, please let me know! (PM or this thread or both)

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The Italian aluminum moka pots work well,  are inexpensive and commonly used in Italy daily.

I was just about to post a thread then saw this...

Any ideas on which are best? I bought one from Whittard's but it consistently produced terrible coffee (however it was the large model). My parents had one from a few decades back which was very good, but we lost the filter :(

If there's something on Amazon.co.uk or equivalent that delivers coffee with thick crema and full aroma without tasting like molten rubber, please let me know! (PM or this thread or both)

It may be the coffee that you are using. Robusta coffee has the distinct smell and taste of burned rubber.

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...delivers coffee with thick crema and full aroma without tasting like molten rubber, please let me know!

Thick crema and full aroma: sounds like you're really searching for an espresso machine, paired with a great grinder and beans roasted in the last week. Welcome to my home!

My home machine is a La Vibiemme Domobar Super, paired with a Macap M4. Love it. Paired with really fresh beans that I have posted to me direct from a roastery which reach me within 3 days of roasting, the crema is magical, the aroma divine and the flavour hmmmm. Must say though, it's in a completely different financial ballpark to most of the machines mentioned here, but I also expect it to last 20 years...

There are suppliers in Australia who allow you to bench-test their espresso machines - a worthwhile exercise if you're looking at 'investing' your hard earned cash on a prosumer grinder and espresso machine. Perhaps you'll find a place similar in the UK?

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